Thomas Christopher Caban, 18071875 (aged 68 years)

Name
Thomas Christopher Caban
Given names
Thomas Christopher
Surname
Caban
Birth about 1807

Immigration October 21, 1830 (aged 23 years)
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/7, Page Number 375 (190)

Text:

Thomas Caborn, one of 176 convicts transported on the ship Lord Melville, 29 May 1830. Sentence details: Convicted at Lincoln Assizes for a term of life. Vessel: Lord Melville. Date of Departure: 29 May 1830. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Citation details:

Stamford Mercury Fri 12 Mar 1830 p. 2

Text:

Burglary at Revesby. Samuel Oldham, aged 25, Edward Huggins, aged 24, and Thos. Caborn, aged 23, laborers, were indicted for breaking into the house of Euphemia Randsley, widow, of Revesby, and stealing therefrom 6 silver tea-spoons, 2 silver watches, 6 silk handkerchiefs, and a quantity of other property. - The prosecutrix stated that on the night of the 7th of January two men went into her bed-room and demanded her money; she screamed; and alarmed her servant, who, in great horror, attempted to escape, but was stopped by the prisoners; the prosecutrix took advantage of an opportunity of making her escape through the window; and on returning home next morning the above articles were gone. It was a lone house, and by making a hole in the wall, and drawing back the bolt and slipping the lock, the prisoners obtained an entrance. Witness could swear to Oldham and Huggins, but only suspected Carborn. - The servant girl, Caroline Wilson, however, spoke to the identity of the latter, as he remained with her a quarter of an hour, threatening to murder her. Mr. John North, a farmer of the neighbourhood, in company with two others, having received information of the robbery, immediately commenced a pursuit after the thieves, and tracked their footsteps in the snow which covered the ground at the time to Boston, by a very circuitous route; the men going 17 miles out of the usual road; this pursuit occupied several hours, and when daylight appeared, a striking peculiarity was observed in one of the footsteps, the sole of the shoe having been mended in an unusual manner. About two miles from Boston, on the verge of the footsteps, a small bone spoon was found, which formed part of the plunder. It was also proved that the three prisoners were seen in company near Boston, on the morning of the robbery, by a man named Baskitter, who had previously known them, and who spoke to them; and that one of the three prisoners wore a pair of half-boots, which exactly corresponded with the peculiar foot-marks observed. In defence, Oldham said he never was near the place, and the other two merely asserted their innocence. Huggins said he had witnesses in court who could prove that he was at home and in bed at the time, but his counsel, Mr. Whitehurst, declined calling them. - The Jury found them all guilty, and sentence of death was recorded against each of them. At the termination of the trial, the Judge ordered Mr. North to be called into the witness box, and observed that the respectable magistrate who had committed the prisoners, had recommended the court to award some token of approbation of the activity and laudable zeal manifested by North, in getting up in the middle of the night, and pursuing the prisoners for several miles, - a proceeding which has greatly facilitated the ends of justice. In order, therefore, to show their approval of his conduct, and as an encouragement to others, the court directed that a reward of 5/- should be given to North.

Citation details:

Cambridge Chronicle and Journal Fri 19 Mar 1830 p. 4

Text:

LINCOLNSHIRE ASSIZES. Samuel Oldham (35), Edward Huggins (24) and Thomas Carborn (23) were indicted for a burglary in the house of Mrs. Radsley at Revesley. The prosecutrix is a widow, residing at a lone house near a quarter of a mile distant from any other. On the night of the 7th of January three men entered her house and demanded her keys. The noise they made awoke her servant maid, who jumped out of bed and attempted to escape. She continued to struggle, and called upon a man named North, who slept over the kitchen, to come down; but he, it appeared, was fearful of the thieves, and remained in his room. The girl at last got away from the man, and Mrs. Radsley and her daughter succeeded in getting out of the window, and alarmed the inhabitants about a quarter of a mile distant. One of them, Frederick North, brother to the person of that name above mentioned, tracked the three men in snow to within two miles of Boston, a distance of twenty-five miles. He continued in the pursuit the whole of that night, and until eight o'clock the next morning. On the track, North found a mustard-spoon, which the thieves had stolen with other articles from the prosecutrix's house. They were apprehended at Boston. The three prisoners were identified by the prosecutrix and the servant girl. The jury found them guilty - and sentence of death was recorded. The learned Judge eulogised the conduct of Frederick North, to whom he ordered a reward of 5/- to be paid under Mr. Peel's Act.

Text:

The ship Lord Melvile (2) arrived in NSW 21 Oct 1830

Birth of a sonJames Caban
about 1840 (aged 33 years)

MarriageJane BeattieView this family
about 1841 (aged 34 years)

Text:

Granted 12 Apr 1841 by Rev. J. Hetherington at Patricks Plains, Thomas Cabourn age 33, Lord Melville, life, ticket of leave and Jane Beattie, 17, Rogers, came free

Text:

Marriage registration not located. Date based on date they were granted permission to marry.

Birth of a sonThomas Caban
about 1842 (aged 35 years)

Birth of a sonFrancis Beattie Caban
1843 (aged 36 years)
Text:

V18434394 47/1843 CABOURN FRANCIS B THOMAS JANE

Birth of a sonRobert Caban
about 1845 (aged 38 years)

Birth of a daughterJane Caban
1847 (aged 40 years)
Text:

V1847615 49/1847 CABURN JANE THOMAS JANE

Birth of a sonWilliam Caban
about 1849 (aged 42 years)

Birth of a sonJohn Christopher Caban
about 1851 (aged 44 years)

Text:

Cannot locate birth registration. A number of Ancestry family trees put his date of birth at 1851 with no source noted.

Marriage of a childRobert CabanEliza Jane CadmanView this family
1874 (aged 67 years)
Text:

Name: Eliza Jane Cadman Spouse Name: Robert Caban Marriage Date: 1874 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Wollombi, New South Wales Registration Year: 1874 Registration Number: 4201

Marriage of a childJohn Christopher CabanClara Janet ChickView this family
1874 (aged 67 years)
Text:

4204/1874 CABAN JOHN CHICK CLARA JANET WOLLOMBI

Death 1875 (aged 68 years)
Text:

10498/1875 CABAN THOMAS C THOMAS ANN WOLLOMBI

Burial
Text:

Cemetery: Wollombi General Family Name: Caban Given Names: Thomas Christopher Birth Date: Death Date: 30 Mar 1875 Age: 74y Remarks: b. Lincolnshire Eng; h/Jane; father Portion: Row: Q

Family with Jane Beattie
himself
18071875
Birth: about 1807
Death: 1875Wollombi, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
wife
18181882
Birth: February 2, 1818 21 21
Death: May 13, 1882Deadmans Creek, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: about 1841
0 months
son
18401910
Birth: about 1840 33 21
Death: 1910Kurri Kurri, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18421903
Birth: about 1842 35 23
Death: 1903Scone, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
18431924
Birth: 1843 36 24New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1924Lambton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18451888
Birth: about 1845 38 26
Death: 1888Millfield, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
1847
Birth: 1847 40 28New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
son
18491896
Birth: about 1849 42 30
Death: 1896Millfield, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18511929
Birth: about 1851 44 32
Death: 1929Cessnock, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
BirthCalculated from age at conviction
ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/7, Page Number 375 (190)

Text:

Thomas Caborn, one of 176 convicts transported on the ship Lord Melville, 29 May 1830. Sentence details: Convicted at Lincoln Assizes for a term of life. Vessel: Lord Melville. Date of Departure: 29 May 1830. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

ImmigrationBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Stamford Mercury Fri 12 Mar 1830 p. 2

Text:

Burglary at Revesby. Samuel Oldham, aged 25, Edward Huggins, aged 24, and Thos. Caborn, aged 23, laborers, were indicted for breaking into the house of Euphemia Randsley, widow, of Revesby, and stealing therefrom 6 silver tea-spoons, 2 silver watches, 6 silk handkerchiefs, and a quantity of other property. - The prosecutrix stated that on the night of the 7th of January two men went into her bed-room and demanded her money; she screamed; and alarmed her servant, who, in great horror, attempted to escape, but was stopped by the prisoners; the prosecutrix took advantage of an opportunity of making her escape through the window; and on returning home next morning the above articles were gone. It was a lone house, and by making a hole in the wall, and drawing back the bolt and slipping the lock, the prisoners obtained an entrance. Witness could swear to Oldham and Huggins, but only suspected Carborn. - The servant girl, Caroline Wilson, however, spoke to the identity of the latter, as he remained with her a quarter of an hour, threatening to murder her. Mr. John North, a farmer of the neighbourhood, in company with two others, having received information of the robbery, immediately commenced a pursuit after the thieves, and tracked their footsteps in the snow which covered the ground at the time to Boston, by a very circuitous route; the men going 17 miles out of the usual road; this pursuit occupied several hours, and when daylight appeared, a striking peculiarity was observed in one of the footsteps, the sole of the shoe having been mended in an unusual manner. About two miles from Boston, on the verge of the footsteps, a small bone spoon was found, which formed part of the plunder. It was also proved that the three prisoners were seen in company near Boston, on the morning of the robbery, by a man named Baskitter, who had previously known them, and who spoke to them; and that one of the three prisoners wore a pair of half-boots, which exactly corresponded with the peculiar foot-marks observed. In defence, Oldham said he never was near the place, and the other two merely asserted their innocence. Huggins said he had witnesses in court who could prove that he was at home and in bed at the time, but his counsel, Mr. Whitehurst, declined calling them. - The Jury found them all guilty, and sentence of death was recorded against each of them. At the termination of the trial, the Judge ordered Mr. North to be called into the witness box, and observed that the respectable magistrate who had committed the prisoners, had recommended the court to award some token of approbation of the activity and laudable zeal manifested by North, in getting up in the middle of the night, and pursuing the prisoners for several miles, - a proceeding which has greatly facilitated the ends of justice. In order, therefore, to show their approval of his conduct, and as an encouragement to others, the court directed that a reward of 5/- should be given to North.

ImmigrationBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Cambridge Chronicle and Journal Fri 19 Mar 1830 p. 4

Text:

LINCOLNSHIRE ASSIZES. Samuel Oldham (35), Edward Huggins (24) and Thomas Carborn (23) were indicted for a burglary in the house of Mrs. Radsley at Revesley. The prosecutrix is a widow, residing at a lone house near a quarter of a mile distant from any other. On the night of the 7th of January three men entered her house and demanded her keys. The noise they made awoke her servant maid, who jumped out of bed and attempted to escape. She continued to struggle, and called upon a man named North, who slept over the kitchen, to come down; but he, it appeared, was fearful of the thieves, and remained in his room. The girl at last got away from the man, and Mrs. Radsley and her daughter succeeded in getting out of the window, and alarmed the inhabitants about a quarter of a mile distant. One of them, Frederick North, brother to the person of that name above mentioned, tracked the three men in snow to within two miles of Boston, a distance of twenty-five miles. He continued in the pursuit the whole of that night, and until eight o'clock the next morning. On the track, North found a mustard-spoon, which the thieves had stolen with other articles from the prosecutrix's house. They were apprehended at Boston. The three prisoners were identified by the prosecutrix and the servant girl. The jury found them guilty - and sentence of death was recorded. The learned Judge eulogised the conduct of Frederick North, to whom he ordered a reward of 5/- to be paid under Mr. Peel's Act.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Text:

The ship Lord Melvile (2) arrived in NSW 21 Oct 1830

MarriageAncestry.com, 'New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts' Applications to Marry, 1826-1851' [Database Online].
Text:

Granted 12 Apr 1841 by Rev. J. Hetherington at Patricks Plains, Thomas Cabourn age 33, Lord Melville, life, ticket of leave and Jane Beattie, 17, Rogers, came free

MarriagePurnell, Marion (editor)
Text:

Marriage registration not located. Date based on date they were granted permission to marry.

DeathNew South Wales. Department of Justice and Attorney General. NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages. [data-base on-line]. Sydney: the Registry.
Text:

10498/1875 CABAN THOMAS C THOMAS ANN WOLLOMBI

BurialMcDonell, Reg. 'Australian Cemeteries Index' [database - on-line].
Text:

Cemetery: Wollombi General Family Name: Caban Given Names: Thomas Christopher Birth Date: Death Date: 30 Mar 1875 Age: 74y Remarks: b. Lincolnshire Eng; h/Jane; father Portion: Row: Q