William Winter, 18131867 (aged 54 years)

Name
William Winter
Given names
William
Surname
Winter
Birth about 1813

MarriageCaroline Elizabeth SpicerView this family
January 19, 1847 (aged 34 years)
Text:

V1847120 32C/1847 WINTER WILLIAM SPICER CAROLINE E MF (Sydney, St Lawrence's Church of England)

Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Thu 21 Jan 1847 p. 8

Text:

MARRIED. By licence, on the 19th instant, at Christ's Church, by the Rev. J.H. Wilkinson, Captain William Winter, of Sussex-street South, to Caroline Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. T. Spicer, late of New Zealand, who for many years was a respectable auctioneer in this City.

Birth of a daughterAnnie Maria Winter
1849 (aged 36 years)
Text:

V1849322 59/1849 WINTER ANN M WILLIAM CAROLINE E

Birth of a daughterLouisa Winter
1852 (aged 39 years)
Birth of a daughterSarah Winter
1855 (aged 42 years)
Text:

V1855587 58/1855 WINTER SARAH WILLIAM CAROLINE

SeparationCaroline Elizabeth SpicerView this family
about 1859 (aged 46 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Thu 3 Feb 1859 p. 8

Text:

CAUTION. - All Persons are hereby warned not to give any credit to my wife CAROLINE ELIZABETH WINTER, as from and after this date I will not be responsible for any debts she may contract. WILLIAM WINTER. Sydney, 2nd February.

Birth of a sonGeorge Winter
1859 (aged 46 years)
Text:

1549/1859 WINTER GEORGE WILLIAM CAROLINE SYDNEY

Marriage of a childCharles Ferdinand RudbeckAnnie Maria WinterView this family
1866 (aged 53 years)
Text:

338/1866 RUDBECK CHARLES F WINTER ANNIE M SYDNEY

Death December 8, 1867 (aged 54 years)
Text:

Recorded in 1863 on son George's admission to Randwick Asylum as having previously abandoned family and "gone to sea".

Citation details:

The Mercury (Hobart) Fri 7 Feb 1868 p. 2

Text:

HURRICANE AT THE ISLANDS. MASTER AND MATE OF THE CLYDE DROWNED. The schooners Clyde and Neva arrived in our harbour on Saturday from the islands, and report a hurricane as having occurred off Rorotonga on the 8th of December , in which Captain Irving, of the Clyde and the mate, Mr. Winter, were washed overboard off that vessel and lost. The following are the particulars of the melancholy accident, as furnished by Captain Elder, who comes in charge of the Clyde: - On Friday the 6th of December, we were filling up with cargo alongside the schooner Neva, at Ararangi, when the rope by which we made fast gave way in a heavy gale, and the vessel put to sea, intending to come on without completing her loading. On the following day had strong E.N.E. winds, and at two p.m. the wind suddenly shifted to the S.W., blowing a hurricane, accompanied by heavy cross sea. The vessel was about to wear round when a heavy lurch carried everyone to leeward. The crew went to the helm, and pout it down in order to bring the vessel to the wind, and on looking round failed to observe the captain and mate who were standing on deck a few minutes previously. A square sail and dog were also missed at the same time. The crew put back to Ararangi, in order to inform the widow of Captain Irving, of the occurrence. The vessel was filled up with cargo here, and continued the passage in charge of Captain Elder, who was resident on the island, and an intimate friend of deceased. Captain Elder speaks very highly of the conduct of the crew under the trying circumstances. The deceased, Captain Irving, was well known at this port, having commanded the schooner Osprey, trading here for many years. William Winter, the mate, was likewise well known, and leaves two children at this port. He was previously in the cutter Hercules, and commanded the first vessel despatched to the Kaipara to load timber, on Messrs. Brown, Campbell, and Co's account. Captain Irving purchased the Clyde at this port only a few months previously. - Southern Cross, January 11th.

Text:

The Daily Southern Cross was an Auckland newspaper. The story came from Volume XXIV, Issue 3267, 6 January 1868, Page 3.

Citation details:

Evening Post. Volume III, Issue 287, 17 Jan 1868 p. 2

Text:

HURRICANE AT THE SOUTH SEA ISLANDS. LOSS OF THE CAPTAIN AND MATE OF THE SCHOONER CLYDE. (From N.Z. Herald, 11th January.) The schooner Clyde, which arrived in harbour on Saturday last, brings intelligence of the loss of Capt Irvin and the mate of that vessel in a fearful hurricane which had been met with in the neighbourhood of Avaroa, South Sea Islands. Capt Irvin was extremely well known here, having been a regular trader from this port for many years, and his death is deeply regretted by a number of friends and acquaintances. He is also one of the oldest and most highly esteemed settlers of Rorotonga, and leaves a wife to mourn his loss. The mate, Mr. J. Winter, was, we believe, unmarried, and his connections are unknown to the crew, though it is probable that information an this head will be obtained from some of his friends in Auckland, or from the papers in his chest, which is on board the Clyde...

Family with Caroline Elizabeth Spicer
himself
18131867
Birth: about 1813
Death: December 8, 1867the high seas
wife
18261875
Birth: 1826 28 27New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1875Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: January 19, 1847Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18491916
Birth: 1849 36 23New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1916Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18521890
Birth: 1852 39 26Auckland, Auckland, North Island, New Zealand
Death: 1890Newtown, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18551914
Birth: 1855 42 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1914Newcastle, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
5 years
son
18591863
Birth: 1859 46 33Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1863Randwick, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Birthwww.ancestry.com. Ancestry.com. Public Member Trees [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006
MarriageNew South Wales. Department of Justice and Attorney General. NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages. [data-base on-line]. Sydney: the Registry.
Text:

V1847120 32C/1847 WINTER WILLIAM SPICER CAROLINE E MF (Sydney, St Lawrence's Church of England)

MarriageNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Thu 21 Jan 1847 p. 8

Text:

MARRIED. By licence, on the 19th instant, at Christ's Church, by the Rev. J.H. Wilkinson, Captain William Winter, of Sussex-street South, to Caroline Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. T. Spicer, late of New Zealand, who for many years was a respectable auctioneer in this City.

SeparationNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Thu 3 Feb 1859 p. 8

Text:

CAUTION. - All Persons are hereby warned not to give any credit to my wife CAROLINE ELIZABETH WINTER, as from and after this date I will not be responsible for any debts she may contract. WILLIAM WINTER. Sydney, 2nd February.

DeathPurnell, Marion (editor)
Text:

Recorded in 1863 on son George's admission to Randwick Asylum as having previously abandoned family and "gone to sea".

DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

The Mercury (Hobart) Fri 7 Feb 1868 p. 2

Text:

HURRICANE AT THE ISLANDS. MASTER AND MATE OF THE CLYDE DROWNED. The schooners Clyde and Neva arrived in our harbour on Saturday from the islands, and report a hurricane as having occurred off Rorotonga on the 8th of December , in which Captain Irving, of the Clyde and the mate, Mr. Winter, were washed overboard off that vessel and lost. The following are the particulars of the melancholy accident, as furnished by Captain Elder, who comes in charge of the Clyde: - On Friday the 6th of December, we were filling up with cargo alongside the schooner Neva, at Ararangi, when the rope by which we made fast gave way in a heavy gale, and the vessel put to sea, intending to come on without completing her loading. On the following day had strong E.N.E. winds, and at two p.m. the wind suddenly shifted to the S.W., blowing a hurricane, accompanied by heavy cross sea. The vessel was about to wear round when a heavy lurch carried everyone to leeward. The crew went to the helm, and pout it down in order to bring the vessel to the wind, and on looking round failed to observe the captain and mate who were standing on deck a few minutes previously. A square sail and dog were also missed at the same time. The crew put back to Ararangi, in order to inform the widow of Captain Irving, of the occurrence. The vessel was filled up with cargo here, and continued the passage in charge of Captain Elder, who was resident on the island, and an intimate friend of deceased. Captain Elder speaks very highly of the conduct of the crew under the trying circumstances. The deceased, Captain Irving, was well known at this port, having commanded the schooner Osprey, trading here for many years. William Winter, the mate, was likewise well known, and leaves two children at this port. He was previously in the cutter Hercules, and commanded the first vessel despatched to the Kaipara to load timber, on Messrs. Brown, Campbell, and Co's account. Captain Irving purchased the Clyde at this port only a few months previously. - Southern Cross, January 11th.

DeathPaperspast. [database - online]. National Library of New Zealand
Text:

The Daily Southern Cross was an Auckland newspaper. The story came from Volume XXIV, Issue 3267, 6 January 1868, Page 3.

DeathPaperspast. [database - online]. National Library of New Zealand
Citation details:

Evening Post. Volume III, Issue 287, 17 Jan 1868 p. 2

Text:

HURRICANE AT THE SOUTH SEA ISLANDS. LOSS OF THE CAPTAIN AND MATE OF THE SCHOONER CLYDE. (From N.Z. Herald, 11th January.) The schooner Clyde, which arrived in harbour on Saturday last, brings intelligence of the loss of Capt Irvin and the mate of that vessel in a fearful hurricane which had been met with in the neighbourhood of Avaroa, South Sea Islands. Capt Irvin was extremely well known here, having been a regular trader from this port for many years, and his death is deeply regretted by a number of friends and acquaintances. He is also one of the oldest and most highly esteemed settlers of Rorotonga, and leaves a wife to mourn his loss. The mate, Mr. J. Winter, was, we believe, unmarried, and his connections are unknown to the crew, though it is probable that information an this head will be obtained from some of his friends in Auckland, or from the papers in his chest, which is on board the Clyde...