William John Speed, 17601838 (aged 78 years)

Name
William John /Speed/
Given names
William John
Surname
Speed
Birth about 1760

MarriageSarah NelsonView this family
September 14, 1785 (aged 25 years)
Text:

Name: William John Speed Gender: Male Marriage Date: 14 Sep 1785 Marriage Place: Furneux Pelham,Hertford,England Spouse: Sarah Nelson FHL Film Number: 991318

SeparationSarah NelsonView this family
1792 (aged 32 years)

Source: unknown
Text:

Sarah left due to impropriety of conduct on William behalf, and articles of separation were sign between the two.

MarriageAnn ThornView this family
November 11, 1799 (aged 39 years)
Text:

Name: William Speed Marriage Date: 11 Nov 1799 Archive Provided Parish: Petersham, St Peter Parish as it Appears: Petersham Spouse: Ann Thorn Reference Number: P48/1/8a-b

Citation details:

Kentish Gazette Tue 28 Mar 1809 p. 2

Text:

...Miss Thorn deposed that the prisoner came to lodge at her father's on the 6th October 1799, and she married him in the November following. After he had lived with here about five months, he went to Halifax, and left her pregnant. He never contributed to the support of the child.

MarriageElizabeth RussellView this family
about 1800 (aged 40 years)

Immigration February 27, 1810 (aged 50 years)
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 431 (215)

Text:

William John Speed, one of 200 convicts transported on the ship Ann, August 1809. Details: Sentence details: Convicted at Surrey Assizes for a term of 7 years on 22 March 1809. Vessel: Ann. Date of Departure: August 1809. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Citation details:

Kentish Gazette Tue 28 Mar 1809 p. 2

Text:

SURREY ASSIZES - Kingston, March 23. The Lord Chief Baron and Mr. Justice Heath arrived from Horsham yesterday afternoon, and immediately opened their Commission, which enabled them to proceed early this morning to business. CROWN SIDE - BIGAMY William John Speed, a Lieut.-Colonel in the Army was indicted for bigamy, in marrying Ann Thorn, his former wife being still alive. Mr. Bolland, as Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that the prisoner at the bar, in the year 1785, was an Ensign in the Marines, and then became acquainted with Miss Nelson, whose father was then an alderman, and had been a Mayor of London. After some interval of courtship he married that lady on the 9th of September, 1789, at the Parish of Furneaux Pellham, in the county of Hertford. He continued with his wife for some years, and had children by her, but in consequence of impropriety of conduct on his part, she was compelled to seek refuge with her father, and in the year 1792 articles of separation were signed between them. The prisoner was abroad for some time, and in the year 1799 he was recommended to lodge in the house of a Mr. Thorn, a respectable market-gardener, near Putney. He soon found means to insinuate himself into the favour of his second daughter, and she was persuaded to marry him. He represented himself as a Lieut.-Colonel in the army, and as one having the best expectations. They had not however, been married but a very short time when he went to Germany, and from thence Miss Thorn received a letter from him, saying, she must not look to him for protection as he was already married, and his wife was still living. In short having lived with her but a very little time, he wholly abandoned her. The register of his first marriage was put in, and his identity proved. By this it appeared that he was married to his first wife, Miss Nelson, on the 14th of September 1785 at Furneux Pelham, in Hertfordshire, and a witness proved his wife was still living. Miss Thorn deposed, that the prisoner came to lodge at her father's on 6th of October 1799 and she married him in the November following. After he had lived with her about five months he went to Halifax and left her pregnant. He never contributed to the support of the child. The prisoner being called upon for his defence said he should merit the severest punishment of the laws if he had wilfully offended, but he hoped the Court would believe, after they had heard his case, that he had erred through ignorance. It was true he had married Miss Nelson as was stated, and he had lived with her until they had six children. His means were then unequal to the support of so large a family. Three of the children died; his mother took the eldest, and his wife at that time had an employment which produced her two guineas a week. She agreed to provide for two children, and after some time a deed was brought him to sign, which he understood was to secure to her own separate use those two guineas a week. No sooner had he signed it than his wife refused any longer to take care of the children, and he understood he had been deceived into signing a deed of absolute separation from his wife. After this he instituted a suit in the Ecclesiastical Court, either to compel his wife to return to him, or to get an absolute separation; and in a motion which was made in the King's Bench for a prohibition, Lord Kenyon had said from the Bench, that after that deed he was free as air. Thinking himself thus free from restraint, he did marry Miss Thorn, and continued with her until his military duties called him abroad. When she discovered his former marriage, she refused any longer to live with him, and when he solicited her to it, her reply was angrily, that she could hang him if she liked it. He stated that he had suffered great hardships in prison; he had been shut up in a damp and solitary dungeon, which had brought on him a rheumatic fever; and as by an Order of the Commander in Chief, that no Officer in custody of the law should receive his pay, he had lost all his pay during his confinement. He protested that he never meant to offend the laws, which he had fought to protect, in all ranks, from an Ensign to that of Lieutenant Colonel, and in what he had done, he had been misled by error of judgment. The Lord Chief Baron told the jury the fact was proved unquestionably, and he expressed some indignation at the language represented to have come from Lord Kenyon, the absurdity of which every Attorney's Clerk could have told him. He said he should consider hereafter what degree of punishment the prisoner merited. The jury found him guilty.

Citation details:

Morning Chronicle Mon 27 Mar 1809 p. 3

Text:

The Surrey Assizes finished on Saturday. ...William John Speed convicted of Bigamy, was sentenced to be transported for seven years.

Text:

The ship Anne II arrived in the colony 27 Feb 1810

Emigration January 1812 (aged 52 years)

Citation details:

Sydney Gazette Sat 25 Jan 1812 p. 2

Text:

CLAIMS AND DEMANDS. The following persons being about to depart the Colony, request all those who have... In the Brig Cyclops,... Passengers - Mr. William John Speed, Mrs Eliza Speed and three Children, and Ann Hale.

MarriageElizabeth AzireView this family
March 12, 1832 (aged 72 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Gazette Tue 13 Mar 1832 p. 3

Text:

Yesterday, at St James Church, by the Rev. Richard Hill, William John John Speed, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the late St Vincent Rangers, and late an Officer in the Commissariat at Van Diemen's Land, widower to Mrs. Elizabeth Raine, widow.

Death 1838 (aged 78 years)
Text:

V18382148 22/1838 SPEED WILLIAM J AGE 77

Family with Sarah Nelson
himself
17601838
Birth: about 1760
Death: 1838New South Wales, Australia
wife
17641826
Birth: 1764
Death: 1826London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Marriage
Marriage: September 14, 1785Furneux Pelham, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom
4 years
son
1789
Birth: April 15, 1789 29 25
Death:
21 months
daughter
17901847
Birth: about 1790 30 26
Death: October 14, 1847Hobart, South East, Tasmania, Australia
17 months
son
1791
Birth: May 16, 1791 31 27
Death:
Family with Ann Thorn
himself
17601838
Birth: about 1760
Death: 1838New South Wales, Australia
wife
Marriage
Marriage: November 11, 1799Petersham, Surrey, England, United Kingdom
14 months
son
18001824
Birth: about 1800 40
Death: about 1824
Family with Elizabeth Russell
himself
17601838
Birth: about 1760
Death: 1838New South Wales, Australia
wife
Marriage
Marriage: about 1800
4 years
son
18031827
Birth: about 1803 43
Death: July 1827Hobart, South East, Tasmania, Australia
12 months
daughter
8 years
son
3 years
son
18121890
Birth: 1812 52New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1890Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
5 years
daughter
18161838
Birth: about 1816 56
Death: October 6, 1838New South Wales, Australia
6 years
daughter
18211830
Birth: December 7, 1821 61Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Death: May 28, 1830
2 years
son
Family with Elizabeth Azire
himself
17601838
Birth: about 1760
Death: 1838New South Wales, Australia
wife
17811842
Birth: about 1781
Death: June 12, 1842New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: March 12, 1832Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
John Fulloon + Elizabeth Azire
partner’s partner
wife
17811842
Birth: about 1781
Death: June 12, 1842New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: April 11, 1802Whitechapel, London, England, United Kingdom
17 months
step-son
18031861
Birth: August 29, 1803 22
Death: 1861New Zealand
3 years
step-daughter
18061869
Birth: November 19, 1806 25
Death: January 24, 1869Redfern, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18091873
Birth: April 3, 1809 28
Death: April 4, 1873New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18111877
Birth: May 3, 1811 30
Death: December 17, 1877Woolloomooloo, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
step-son
18131815
Birth: about 1813 32
Death: May 1815
8 years
step-son
18201899
Birth: about 1820 39
Death: March 13, 1899Queensland, Australia
Robert Raine + Elizabeth Azire
partner’s partner
17881828
Birth: about 1788
Death: 1828New South Wales, Australia
wife
17811842
Birth: about 1781
Death: June 12, 1842New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1826Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
BirthCalculated from age at death
MarriageAncestry.com. England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
Text:

Name: William John Speed Gender: Male Marriage Date: 14 Sep 1785 Marriage Place: Furneux Pelham,Hertford,England Spouse: Sarah Nelson FHL Film Number: 991318

Separationunknown
Text:

Sarah left due to impropriety of conduct on William behalf, and articles of separation were sign between the two.

MarriageAncestry.com. Surrey, England, Marriages, 1754-1937 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
Text:

Name: William Speed Marriage Date: 11 Nov 1799 Archive Provided Parish: Petersham, St Peter Parish as it Appears: Petersham Spouse: Ann Thorn Reference Number: P48/1/8a-b

MarriageBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Kentish Gazette Tue 28 Mar 1809 p. 2

Text:

...Miss Thorn deposed that the prisoner came to lodge at her father's on the 6th October 1799, and she married him in the November following. After he had lived with here about five months, he went to Halifax, and left her pregnant. He never contributed to the support of the child.

ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 431 (215)

Text:

William John Speed, one of 200 convicts transported on the ship Ann, August 1809. Details: Sentence details: Convicted at Surrey Assizes for a term of 7 years on 22 March 1809. Vessel: Ann. Date of Departure: August 1809. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

ImmigrationBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Kentish Gazette Tue 28 Mar 1809 p. 2

Text:

SURREY ASSIZES - Kingston, March 23. The Lord Chief Baron and Mr. Justice Heath arrived from Horsham yesterday afternoon, and immediately opened their Commission, which enabled them to proceed early this morning to business. CROWN SIDE - BIGAMY William John Speed, a Lieut.-Colonel in the Army was indicted for bigamy, in marrying Ann Thorn, his former wife being still alive. Mr. Bolland, as Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that the prisoner at the bar, in the year 1785, was an Ensign in the Marines, and then became acquainted with Miss Nelson, whose father was then an alderman, and had been a Mayor of London. After some interval of courtship he married that lady on the 9th of September, 1789, at the Parish of Furneaux Pellham, in the county of Hertford. He continued with his wife for some years, and had children by her, but in consequence of impropriety of conduct on his part, she was compelled to seek refuge with her father, and in the year 1792 articles of separation were signed between them. The prisoner was abroad for some time, and in the year 1799 he was recommended to lodge in the house of a Mr. Thorn, a respectable market-gardener, near Putney. He soon found means to insinuate himself into the favour of his second daughter, and she was persuaded to marry him. He represented himself as a Lieut.-Colonel in the army, and as one having the best expectations. They had not however, been married but a very short time when he went to Germany, and from thence Miss Thorn received a letter from him, saying, she must not look to him for protection as he was already married, and his wife was still living. In short having lived with her but a very little time, he wholly abandoned her. The register of his first marriage was put in, and his identity proved. By this it appeared that he was married to his first wife, Miss Nelson, on the 14th of September 1785 at Furneux Pelham, in Hertfordshire, and a witness proved his wife was still living. Miss Thorn deposed, that the prisoner came to lodge at her father's on 6th of October 1799 and she married him in the November following. After he had lived with her about five months he went to Halifax and left her pregnant. He never contributed to the support of the child. The prisoner being called upon for his defence said he should merit the severest punishment of the laws if he had wilfully offended, but he hoped the Court would believe, after they had heard his case, that he had erred through ignorance. It was true he had married Miss Nelson as was stated, and he had lived with her until they had six children. His means were then unequal to the support of so large a family. Three of the children died; his mother took the eldest, and his wife at that time had an employment which produced her two guineas a week. She agreed to provide for two children, and after some time a deed was brought him to sign, which he understood was to secure to her own separate use those two guineas a week. No sooner had he signed it than his wife refused any longer to take care of the children, and he understood he had been deceived into signing a deed of absolute separation from his wife. After this he instituted a suit in the Ecclesiastical Court, either to compel his wife to return to him, or to get an absolute separation; and in a motion which was made in the King's Bench for a prohibition, Lord Kenyon had said from the Bench, that after that deed he was free as air. Thinking himself thus free from restraint, he did marry Miss Thorn, and continued with her until his military duties called him abroad. When she discovered his former marriage, she refused any longer to live with him, and when he solicited her to it, her reply was angrily, that she could hang him if she liked it. He stated that he had suffered great hardships in prison; he had been shut up in a damp and solitary dungeon, which had brought on him a rheumatic fever; and as by an Order of the Commander in Chief, that no Officer in custody of the law should receive his pay, he had lost all his pay during his confinement. He protested that he never meant to offend the laws, which he had fought to protect, in all ranks, from an Ensign to that of Lieutenant Colonel, and in what he had done, he had been misled by error of judgment. The Lord Chief Baron told the jury the fact was proved unquestionably, and he expressed some indignation at the language represented to have come from Lord Kenyon, the absurdity of which every Attorney's Clerk could have told him. He said he should consider hereafter what degree of punishment the prisoner merited. The jury found him guilty.

ImmigrationBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Morning Chronicle Mon 27 Mar 1809 p. 3

Text:

The Surrey Assizes finished on Saturday. ...William John Speed convicted of Bigamy, was sentenced to be transported for seven years.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Text:

The ship Anne II arrived in the colony 27 Feb 1810

EmigrationNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Gazette Sat 25 Jan 1812 p. 2

Text:

CLAIMS AND DEMANDS. The following persons being about to depart the Colony, request all those who have... In the Brig Cyclops,... Passengers - Mr. William John Speed, Mrs Eliza Speed and three Children, and Ann Hale.

MarriageNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Gazette Tue 13 Mar 1832 p. 3

Text:

Yesterday, at St James Church, by the Rev. Richard Hill, William John John Speed, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the late St Vincent Rangers, and late an Officer in the Commissariat at Van Diemen's Land, widower to Mrs. Elizabeth Raine, widow.

DeathNew South Wales. Department of Justice and Attorney General. NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages. [data-base on-line]. Sydney: the Registry.
Text:

V18382148 22/1838 SPEED WILLIAM J AGE 77