Bridget Hollywood, 18391900 (aged 61 years)

Name
Bridget /Hollywood/
Given names
Bridget
Surname
Hollywood
Married name
Bridget /Mellon/
Name
Bridget /Hill/
Given names
Bridget
Surname
Hill
Name
Martha Bridget /Hill/
Given names
Martha Bridget
Surname
Hill
Name
Bridget /Rowney/
Given names
Bridget
Surname
Rowney
Name
Bridget /Rooney/
Given names
Bridget
Surname
Rooney
Birth about 1839 39
Immigration 1840 (aged 1 year)
Text: Name: Bridget Hollywood Ship: Margaret Ship Departure Year: 1840 Remarks: Age 1yr 8 months daughter of Catherine Hollywood
Not marriedEdward MellonView this family
about 1855 (aged 16 years)

Text: Stated on birth certificate of daughter Ada (1865) that Edward Mellen and Bridget Holiwood married 7 Jun 1855 at Singleton BUT unlikely that marriage ever took place.
Event
Charged with killing a pig
December 1868 (aged 29 years)
Citation details: Maitland Mercury Thu 31 Dec 1868 p. 4
Text: MALICIOUSLY KILLING A PIG. Bridget Hill, alias Mellon, was charged with maliciously killing a pig, the property of Alice Lalley. On the 18th instant Mary Ann Miller, complainant's mother, was opposite defendant's farm at Doctor's Creek, when she saw complainant's pig being seized by two dogs belonging to defendant; presently she observed defendant come running out of her house armed with an axe, with which she dealt the pig several blows and killed it. This witness deposed that there was only a cockatoo fence round defendant's land and swore positively that the pig was not in the paddock, but on some unfenced land belonging to the defendant. - Charles Huggins deposed that he was riding past defendant's place when he met Mary Anne Miller, who asked him to turn back to have a look at the pig; he did so, and found it lying dead in a waterhole, apparently having been much worried by dogs; the pig was valued by the complainant at 3 pounds. For the defence, Edward Mellon, a boy about nine years old, son of the defendant, swore that the pig was in snclosed ground, destroying a crop of potatoes; that his mother told him to put the dogs on the pig, and that the dogs ran it outside the encosure and subsequently worried it, the pig being killed by falling into a dry waterhole. The bench considered the case made out, and ordered complainant to pay 30s. for value of the pig destroyed, together with 8s. 6d. costs of court.
MarriageJames ButlerView this family
1874 (aged 35 years)
Text: Name: Martha Bridget Hill Spouse Name: James Butler Marriage Date: 1874 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Patricks Plain, New South Wales Registration Year: 1874 Registration Number: 3579
James Butler charged with neglectJames ButlerView this family
1895 (aged 56 years)
Citation details: Singleton Argus Sat 7 Sep 1895 p. 4
Text: SINGLETON POLICE COURT. TUESDAY 3RD SEPTEMBER. (Before Mr. W.M. Macfarlane, P.M.) MAINTENANCE. JAMES BUTLER was charged by his wife, Martha Bridget Butler, with neglecting to contribute towards her support. Mr. Howe appeared for complainant and Mr. Robinson for the defendant. before calling on the case, his Worship asked if some settlement could not be agreed upon between the parties. Upon this suggestion the solicitors retired, and after a consultation between them and also the parties concerned, it was announced that no settlement could be come to. Mr. Robinson admitted the marriage. Martha Bridget Butler then deposed that she had heard her information read. It was true, and defendant was the person she complained of. She lived at Darkey Creek. She had had some disagreements with her husband, who is a farmer, and did keep a colonial wine licence. They had four children. Her husband put her out of her home. That was on the 27th July last. previous to that she had not received any support from her husband since Christmas. He kicked her, and pushed her out of the house, and said if she did not go away he would ram his first down her throat. She said she would not go, and he said if she did not he would "kick her --- liver in". She then went away from the place. Had been ill-treated by him on many occasions, since he had been bound over to keep the peace, but had not been assaulted. On polling day, 24th July, he left her and the children without anything in the house, and for three weeks they had lived on bread and jam. He had not given her a single penny piece since Christmas. There was on the 28th December last to bags of potatoes in the house, and he told her that if she used it she would have to pay for it. On the 28th May last she brought a case against her husband in the police court for assault. The case was not proceeded with, but defendant was bound over to keep the peace towards her. It was on account of her being turned out of the house, and also on account of his threats to her, that she left her home. Her health was very bad, and she was hardly able to stand up. By Mr. Robinson: She had never aggravated defendant. It was not a fact that it was a source of trouble between her husband and herself that she diod not account for the monies taken in the shop. He had once complained about her retaining money. Her husband had not had work away from home for a long time, except in December last, when he was cutting prickly pears. He had been keeping a wine shop and paid for the wine up to last Christmas. There was not a little grocery sold in connection with his shop. Drovers and travellers did not frequently buy tea and sugar at their shop. Sometimes she obliged travellers with a little sugar. It was not a fact that she kept all the money in the shop and left her husband to pay for the things used. He never said that she had 300 pounds of his that had not been accounted for. When he went away to do the prickly pear cutting, her husband left her 1 pound and 15 shillings. He did not leave her 7 pounds. She left her home on a Saturday, and next say went there for her things. He did not go away on that day, and leave her at the house. She saw him pass by Mrs. Harris' place on the ......When she went away from the house she only took away her clothes. Did not take away any blankets, crockery or other things, but did take a few vases that belonged to her children. Although her husband made a number of threats to her, she did not make any complaint against him. She did not know how long he had been bound over to keep the peace toward her. Did not know what remedy she had when she was threatened by her husband. She had never before left her home to go to Harris's place. Did not have a penny of her own, and had not saved any of her husband's money. Her husband could not want her to go back, as he had rented his house. It was not the case that her husband had to give up his business owing to her leaving him. She did not leave him - he turned her out. Could not say when her husband gave her any money, but she did use what little was taken in the wine-shop. Defendant did not have occasion to go to her for money when he wanted it - not for a long time past. Defendant was her second husband. She did not know that her husband had not received any money in connection with the prickly pear contract until May last. By the P.M.: She apprehended danger from the threats made to her by her husband, and that was why she went away. Her husband had a 200 acre farm which was cultivated. Re-examined: She considered her husband ought to be able to contribute to her 15s or 1 pound a week. Defendant here admitted having been bound over to keep the peace on the 28th May last. James Butler jun., son of the last witness, said that he was a farmer, and resided at Darkey Creek. Remembered the day she left her home...
Death January 9, 1900 (aged 61 years)
Text: Name: Bridget Butler Death Date: 1900 Death Place: New South Wales Father's Name: Patrick Registration Year: 1900 Registration Place: Singleton, New South Wales Registration Number: 3431
Citation details: Singleton Argus Sat 13 Jan 1900 p. 4
Text: Death of Mrs. Butler. We regret to record the death of Mrs. Bridget Butler, of Vere, which took place last Tuesday; at the age of 58. The deceased was a native of Ireland, but arrived in the colony when she was very young. She was a resident of this district for very many years. The cause of her death was influenza. Much sympathy is felt with the bereaved husband and family. The deceased leaves a family of six children by a former husband, and five by the latter.
Citation details: Singleton Argus Thu 10 Jan 1901 p. 2
Text: IN MEMORIAM. BUTLER. - In loving memory of our dear mother, Martha Bridget Butler, who died 9th January 1900. "To memory dear." Inserted by her sorrowing Sons and Daughters.
Family with parents
father
mother
18001871
Birth: between 1800 and 1804Ireland
Death: November 18, 1871Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriagebefore 1840
herself
18391900
Birth: about 1839 39Ireland
Death: January 9, 1900Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Edward Mellon
partner
18021867
Birth: 1802 40 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1867Doctors Creek, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
herself
18391900
Birth: about 1839 39Ireland
Death: January 9, 1900Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Not married Not marriedabout 1855
3 years
son
1857
Birth: 1857 55 18Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
son
18591909
Birth: 1859 57 20Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1909Collarenebri, North West Slopes and Plains, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18611939
Birth: 1861 59 22Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1939Granville, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
1863
Birth: 1863 61 24Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
2 years
daughter
18651919
Birth: March 3, 1865 63 26Doctors Creek, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 26, 1919Scarborough, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18671908
Birth: 1867 65 28Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1908West Maitland, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Family with James Butler
husband
1853
Birth: about 1853 51 26
Death:
herself
18391900
Birth: about 1839 39Ireland
Death: January 9, 1900Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriage1874Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
18751902
Birth: 1875 22 36Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1902Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
1877
Birth: 1877 24 38Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
daughter
18791917
Birth: 1879 26 40Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1917Narrabri, North West Slopes and Plains, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
1881
Birth: 1881 28 42Patricks Plain, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
Edward Mellon + Mary Smith
partner
18021867
Birth: 1802 40 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1867Doctors Creek, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
partner’s partner
1813
Birth: about 1813Cavan, Ulster, Ireland
Death:
Marriage Marriageabout 1838
2 years
step-son
3 years
step-daughter
18411921
Birth: about 1841 39 28
Death: 1921Muswellbrook, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
step-son
18431921
Birth: 1843 41 30Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 10, 1921Queensland, Australia
3 years
step-daughter
18451921
Birth: 1845 43 32Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1921Auckland, Auckland, North Island, New Zealand
ImmigrationAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Wives & Children of Irish Convicts, 1825-1840 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Text: Name: Bridget Hollywood Ship: Margaret Ship Departure Year: 1840 Remarks: Age 1yr 8 months daughter of Catherine Hollywood
Not marriedPurnell, Marion (editor), - comment
Text: Stated on birth certificate of daughter Ada (1865) that Edward Mellen and Bridget Holiwood married 7 Jun 1855 at Singleton BUT unlikely that marriage ever took place.
EventNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: Maitland Mercury Thu 31 Dec 1868 p. 4
Text: MALICIOUSLY KILLING A PIG. Bridget Hill, alias Mellon, was charged with maliciously killing a pig, the property of Alice Lalley. On the 18th instant Mary Ann Miller, complainant's mother, was opposite defendant's farm at Doctor's Creek, when she saw complainant's pig being seized by two dogs belonging to defendant; presently she observed defendant come running out of her house armed with an axe, with which she dealt the pig several blows and killed it. This witness deposed that there was only a cockatoo fence round defendant's land and swore positively that the pig was not in the paddock, but on some unfenced land belonging to the defendant. - Charles Huggins deposed that he was riding past defendant's place when he met Mary Anne Miller, who asked him to turn back to have a look at the pig; he did so, and found it lying dead in a waterhole, apparently having been much worried by dogs; the pig was valued by the complainant at 3 pounds. For the defence, Edward Mellon, a boy about nine years old, son of the defendant, swore that the pig was in snclosed ground, destroying a crop of potatoes; that his mother told him to put the dogs on the pig, and that the dogs ran it outside the encosure and subsequently worried it, the pig being killed by falling into a dry waterhole. The bench considered the case made out, and ordered complainant to pay 30s. for value of the pig destroyed, together with 8s. 6d. costs of court.
MarriageAncestry.com. Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text: Name: Martha Bridget Hill Spouse Name: James Butler Marriage Date: 1874 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Patricks Plain, New South Wales Registration Year: 1874 Registration Number: 3579
James Butler charged with neglectNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: Singleton Argus Sat 7 Sep 1895 p. 4
Text: SINGLETON POLICE COURT. TUESDAY 3RD SEPTEMBER. (Before Mr. W.M. Macfarlane, P.M.) MAINTENANCE. JAMES BUTLER was charged by his wife, Martha Bridget Butler, with neglecting to contribute towards her support. Mr. Howe appeared for complainant and Mr. Robinson for the defendant. before calling on the case, his Worship asked if some settlement could not be agreed upon between the parties. Upon this suggestion the solicitors retired, and after a consultation between them and also the parties concerned, it was announced that no settlement could be come to. Mr. Robinson admitted the marriage. Martha Bridget Butler then deposed that she had heard her information read. It was true, and defendant was the person she complained of. She lived at Darkey Creek. She had had some disagreements with her husband, who is a farmer, and did keep a colonial wine licence. They had four children. Her husband put her out of her home. That was on the 27th July last. previous to that she had not received any support from her husband since Christmas. He kicked her, and pushed her out of the house, and said if she did not go away he would ram his first down her throat. She said she would not go, and he said if she did not he would "kick her --- liver in". She then went away from the place. Had been ill-treated by him on many occasions, since he had been bound over to keep the peace, but had not been assaulted. On polling day, 24th July, he left her and the children without anything in the house, and for three weeks they had lived on bread and jam. He had not given her a single penny piece since Christmas. There was on the 28th December last to bags of potatoes in the house, and he told her that if she used it she would have to pay for it. On the 28th May last she brought a case against her husband in the police court for assault. The case was not proceeded with, but defendant was bound over to keep the peace towards her. It was on account of her being turned out of the house, and also on account of his threats to her, that she left her home. Her health was very bad, and she was hardly able to stand up. By Mr. Robinson: She had never aggravated defendant. It was not a fact that it was a source of trouble between her husband and herself that she diod not account for the monies taken in the shop. He had once complained about her retaining money. Her husband had not had work away from home for a long time, except in December last, when he was cutting prickly pears. He had been keeping a wine shop and paid for the wine up to last Christmas. There was not a little grocery sold in connection with his shop. Drovers and travellers did not frequently buy tea and sugar at their shop. Sometimes she obliged travellers with a little sugar. It was not a fact that she kept all the money in the shop and left her husband to pay for the things used. He never said that she had 300 pounds of his that had not been accounted for. When he went away to do the prickly pear cutting, her husband left her 1 pound and 15 shillings. He did not leave her 7 pounds. She left her home on a Saturday, and next say went there for her things. He did not go away on that day, and leave her at the house. She saw him pass by Mrs. Harris' place on the ......When she went away from the house she only took away her clothes. Did not take away any blankets, crockery or other things, but did take a few vases that belonged to her children. Although her husband made a number of threats to her, she did not make any complaint against him. She did not know how long he had been bound over to keep the peace toward her. Did not know what remedy she had when she was threatened by her husband. She had never before left her home to go to Harris's place. Did not have a penny of her own, and had not saved any of her husband's money. Her husband could not want her to go back, as he had rented his house. It was not the case that her husband had to give up his business owing to her leaving him. She did not leave him - he turned her out. Could not say when her husband gave her any money, but she did use what little was taken in the wine-shop. Defendant did not have occasion to go to her for money when he wanted it - not for a long time past. Defendant was her second husband. She did not know that her husband had not received any money in connection with the prickly pear contract until May last. By the P.M.: She apprehended danger from the threats made to her by her husband, and that was why she went away. Her husband had a 200 acre farm which was cultivated. Re-examined: She considered her husband ought to be able to contribute to her 15s or 1 pound a week. Defendant here admitted having been bound over to keep the peace on the 28th May last. James Butler jun., son of the last witness, said that he was a farmer, and resided at Darkey Creek. Remembered the day she left her home...
DeathAncestry.com. Australia Death Index, 1787-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text: Name: Bridget Butler Death Date: 1900 Death Place: New South Wales Father's Name: Patrick Registration Year: 1900 Registration Place: Singleton, New South Wales Registration Number: 3431
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: Singleton Argus Sat 13 Jan 1900 p. 4
Text: Death of Mrs. Butler. We regret to record the death of Mrs. Bridget Butler, of Vere, which took place last Tuesday; at the age of 58. The deceased was a native of Ireland, but arrived in the colony when she was very young. She was a resident of this district for very many years. The cause of her death was influenza. Much sympathy is felt with the bereaved husband and family. The deceased leaves a family of six children by a former husband, and five by the latter.
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: Singleton Argus Thu 10 Jan 1901 p. 2
Text: IN MEMORIAM. BUTLER. - In loving memory of our dear mother, Martha Bridget Butler, who died 9th January 1900. "To memory dear." Inserted by her sorrowing Sons and Daughters.