Thomas McGrath, 18151882 (aged 67 years)

Name
Thomas /McGrath/
Given names
Thomas
Surname
McGrath
Birth 1815 42 18
Census 1822 (aged 7 years)
Text:

Frazer, John, born in the colony, settler, Concord McGrath, Elizabeth, born in the colony, housekeeper J. Frazier McGrath, Ann, 5, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath, adopted by P. Darcey McGrath, Michael, 4, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, John 2, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, Daniel, 1m, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, Mary Ann, orphan school McGrath, Margaret, orphan school McGRATH, THOMAS, 7, born in the colony, orphan school

Petition to Orphan School about April 1822 (aged 7 years)
Text:

Male Orphan School 10 April 1822... Male Orphan School 10 Apr 1822...Petitions were read from Elizabeth McGrath... of their children, when it was Resolved that: Thomas McGrath, aged 6 years...be admitted subject to the conformation of a quorum.

Committed to Orphan School May 10, 1822 (aged 7 years)
Text:

McGrath, Thomas, 7, committed 10 May 1822

Event
Robbery
December 1832 (aged 17 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Herald Mon 24 Dec 1832 p. 3

Text:

DARING ROBBERY AND CAPTURE OF THE ROBBERS. Mr. Meredith, of the Standard Tavern and Hotel, on returning home at 1 o'clock in the morning from rehersal [sic] in company with Mr. Knowles, has his suspicions aroused that all was not correct, by observing lights in the office of Mr. A.B. Spark opposite; in consequence, he put out all the lights in his own house, and placing himself at one of his front windows watched the one opposite, when he observed at least three men in the office; one of them in a dirty white jacket and black hat, and another in a blue jacket and a white hat - they all appeared engaged in breaking open boxes, or other places of security. Mr. M. having armed himself with a waddie, and Mr. K. with a fowling piece, they procured the assistance of some constables, and stationed themselves at the outer door leading from the premises; in a short time they heard some persons inside placing property at the door, with the evident view of carrying it away, and a voice exclaiming "hush"; in a few seconds the door was gently opened, and the whole party outside made a rush. One of the marauders, the notorious Blackstone, first made his appearance, and was floored by Mr. Meredith, in attempting to make his escape; another, named Thomas McGrath was taken at the same moment. Mr. meredith then proceeded to the stable, where he found a man named John Curran secreted among some harnesses, and on removing him, a bag containing a variety of British and foreign coins were found. The men were taken over to Mr. Meredith's, and on being searched, a bunch of false keys, and some silver prize medals were found on the person of Blackstone, and under the chair in which he sat, a piece of Gros de Naples. Outside of Mr. Spark's store a quantity of property was found, and a jemmy, with which the door had been forced.

Citation details:

Sydney Herald Mon 4 Feb 1833 p. 2

Text:

William Blackstone, John Curran and Thomas McGrath were jointly indicted for stealing from the warehouse of A.B. Spark, Esq., 50 dollars, 20 half ditto, 20 quarter ditto, 50 rupees, 160 pieces of silver, value 19 pounds, two half crowns, 14 shillings, 10 pence, 10 farthings, 2 bags, 7 pieces of coin, 5 yards of silk, 5 yards cloth, 6 medals, 5 pair of shoes, 10 silver spoons, 1 silver ladle, 100 buttons, 1 telescope and two pistols, the property of A.B. Spark, Esq., at Sydney on the 21st Dec. Blackstone and Curran wished to plead guilty, but as McGrath pleaded not guilty, His Honour directed the plea of not guilty for the whole to be recorded, and they were put upon their trials. All the prisoners were found guilty, and remanded.

Citation details:

Sydney Herald Mon 25 Feb 1833 p. 2

Text:

William Blackstone, John Curran and Thomas McGrath convicted of breaking and entering a warehouse, and stealing therein, were placed at the bar. In passing sentence, the Chief Justice remarked, this case was too clear to admit of a doubt - it was an offence of an aggravated nature, and theirs was the worst character of that class of offences. The Court had thought it their duty to the inhabitants of this Colony, to relieve them of persons who could conceive with such ingenuity, and execute plans with such boldness as the prisoners of the bar. This caused the Court to award William Blackstone, whom they knew to be an old offender, the extreme penalty of the law, which was, that he should be transported to a penal settlement for the period of his natural life. With respect to John Curran, the Court would pass sentence of transportation for life upon him, according to law; but if the petition he had laid before him (the Chief Justice) was true, the prisoner should petition the Executive, and he would intimate that he should give the case every consideration. The Court would order Thomas McGrath to be transported for seven years. The reason for this distinction was, that he was a youth, and they hoped that the lesson of that day would not be forgotten during his future life.

Death 1882 (aged 67 years)
Family with parents
father
17731852
Birth: about 1773Waterford, Ireland
Death: 1852
mother
17961868
Birth: February 18, 1796 30New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1868Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: May 19, 1812Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
8 months
elder sister
18121899
Birth: 1812 39 15Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1899Leichhardt, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
elder sister
18131891
Birth: 1813 40 16Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1891Darlington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
himself
18151882
Birth: 1815 42 18Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1882Papeete, Tahiti
3 years
younger sister
18171904
Birth: September 20, 1817 44 21Concord, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 6, 1904Marrickville, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
14 months
younger brother
18181887
Birth: November 1, 1818 45 22Concord, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 8, 1887Young, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
Mother’s family with John Frazier
step-father
17891823
Birth: about 1789 29 25Sydney Cove, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 10, 1823Concord, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
mother
17961868
Birth: February 18, 1796 30New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1868Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Not married
Not married: about 1819
2 years
half-brother
18201908
Birth: 1820 31 23Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1908Armadale, Victoria, Australia
3 years
half-brother
18221902
Birth: 1822 33 25Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 21, 1902Grenfell, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
Mother’s family with James Ward
step-father
mother
17961868
Birth: February 18, 1796 30New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1868Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Not married
Not married: about 1825
2 years
half-sister
18261897
Birth: 1826 29Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 22, 1897Lawsons Creek, Central Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
half-sister
1827
Birth: 1827 30Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
2 years
half-sister
18281885
Birth: 1828 31Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1885Goulburn, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
half-sister
18311907
Birth: 1831 34Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 25, 1907Mudgee, Central Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
half-brother
18331888
Birth: 1833 36Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 15, 1888Queensland, Australia
CensusBaxter, Carol, ed. General Muster and land and stock muster of New South Wales 1822. Sydney: Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record in association with the Society of Australian Genealogists, 1988
Text:

Frazer, John, born in the colony, settler, Concord McGrath, Elizabeth, born in the colony, housekeeper J. Frazier McGrath, Ann, 5, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath, adopted by P. Darcey McGrath, Michael, 4, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, John 2, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, Daniel, 1m, born in the colony, child of Elizabeth McGrath McGrath, Mary Ann, orphan school McGrath, Margaret, orphan school McGRATH, THOMAS, 7, born in the colony, orphan school

Petition to Orphan SchoolAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary's Papers, 1788-1825 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.
Text:

Male Orphan School 10 April 1822... Male Orphan School 10 Apr 1822...Petitions were read from Elizabeth McGrath... of their children, when it was Resolved that: Thomas McGrath, aged 6 years...be admitted subject to the conformation of a quorum.

Committed to Orphan SchoolNew South Wales. State Records Office. Child Welfare - Orphan schools, 1817-865 [on-line]
Text:

McGrath, Thomas, 7, committed 10 May 1822

EventNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Herald Mon 24 Dec 1832 p. 3

Text:

DARING ROBBERY AND CAPTURE OF THE ROBBERS. Mr. Meredith, of the Standard Tavern and Hotel, on returning home at 1 o'clock in the morning from rehersal [sic] in company with Mr. Knowles, has his suspicions aroused that all was not correct, by observing lights in the office of Mr. A.B. Spark opposite; in consequence, he put out all the lights in his own house, and placing himself at one of his front windows watched the one opposite, when he observed at least three men in the office; one of them in a dirty white jacket and black hat, and another in a blue jacket and a white hat - they all appeared engaged in breaking open boxes, or other places of security. Mr. M. having armed himself with a waddie, and Mr. K. with a fowling piece, they procured the assistance of some constables, and stationed themselves at the outer door leading from the premises; in a short time they heard some persons inside placing property at the door, with the evident view of carrying it away, and a voice exclaiming "hush"; in a few seconds the door was gently opened, and the whole party outside made a rush. One of the marauders, the notorious Blackstone, first made his appearance, and was floored by Mr. Meredith, in attempting to make his escape; another, named Thomas McGrath was taken at the same moment. Mr. meredith then proceeded to the stable, where he found a man named John Curran secreted among some harnesses, and on removing him, a bag containing a variety of British and foreign coins were found. The men were taken over to Mr. Meredith's, and on being searched, a bunch of false keys, and some silver prize medals were found on the person of Blackstone, and under the chair in which he sat, a piece of Gros de Naples. Outside of Mr. Spark's store a quantity of property was found, and a jemmy, with which the door had been forced.