Joel Samuel Polack, 18071882 (aged 75 years)

Name
Joel Samuel /Polack/
Given names
Joel Samuel
Surname
Polack
Birth
Immigration
Citation details: The Monitor Fri 13 Apr 1827 p. 4
Text:

Mr. Abraham Polack's brother has arrived in "The Elizabeth" He is an artist of great promise. His forte we understand lies in landscape and architectural sketching and painting. Mrs. S. levey of this Colony, is a constant caller at Mr. Polack's in the Strand, where he was entertained on his first arrival with a splendid entertainment, to meet Mr. Rothschild, jun. Mr Samuels, jun and other gentlemen of the first mercantile respectability. Mr levey paid for his freight in hard cash, and took his cargo into his own stores, by which means he will make some 40 or 50 per cent, more of it, than if hurried to sale in the usual manner.

Immigration
1831 (aged 23 years)
Text:

In 1831 he arrived in New Zealand and settled in Hokianga, exploring the surrounding area as well as Poverty Bay and the East Cape. As such he was one of the first Jews in the colony. In 1832 he moved to Kororareka (now Russell) in the Bay of Islands, establishing a successful general store. In 1835 he built New Zealand's first brewery. Critical of James Busby's weak administration he signed the 1837 petition requesting the British government assume responsibility for the protection and government of European settlers

Immigration
1837 (aged 29 years)
Text:

He returned to England in 1837 and the following year his Kororareka store, which had been used against his wishes to store military and naval explosives, was destroyed in an explosion. He fought unsuccessfully for years for compensation. In 1838 he appeared before a House of Lords Select Committee advocating planned colonisation of New Zealand.[2] He believed that unorganised European settlement would destroy Māori society.[2] He wrote two successful books based on his experiences in New Zealand, which he also illustrated. These books are an invaluable insight into pre-colonial New Zealand

Citation details: Sydney Monitor Wed 12 Dec 1838 p. 2
Text:

NEW ZEALAND: Travels and Adventures during a Residence of Seven Years in that country. By J.S. Polack, Rsq. - Mr. Polack appears to us to be the man of all others calculated to introduce the blessings of civilization among a barbarous and benighted people. He does not startle their prejudices with violent and exasperating opposition, but humours then with apparent tolerance, while he is quietly pursuing a series of measures calculated permanently to reclaim then from vice and grievous ignorance. His researches have been infinitely more extensive than those of any other traveller (Cook included) in the same country, and his pictures of New Zealand "society" (!) are, accordingly more full and curious. In his descriptions of the aspect of the wild land he traversed he frequently rises into poetry, though it is impossible not to see that they are in strict alliance with truth. How strikingly he brings before the eye of the reader the solemn and tangled forests - the vast plains - the deep valleys - the towering headlands, and the rushing rivers of New Zealand - "Naval and Military gazette, copied into the Morn. Chronicle of 21st August". (Mr. Polack, the author of the work above, is the brother of Mr. Abraham Polack of Sydney, and son of Mr. Polack, late of the Strand, an eminent portrait painter, and highly respected in the best society. Mr. Polack arrived in London from New Zealand, just in the nick of time to make his fortune as an author of travels, at all events, to promote his fame...

Immigration
1842 (aged 34 years)
Text:

Polack returned to New Zealand in 1842 but his store was destroyed again in 1845 when Kororareka was sacked by Hone Heke during the Flagstaff War. He moved to Auckland (the new capital) where he operated a bonded warehouse and branched out into shipping, profiting from trade with California. From 1845 to 1848 he was the vice consul for the United States of America.

Death
Text:

In 1850 Polack left New Zealand for California. He settled in San Francisco, where he married Mary, the widow of William Hart (who had both lived in New Zealand). He died on 17 April 1882 (28 Nisan 5642) in San Francisco and was buried in the Laurel Hill cemetery. In 1946 they were moved to the Cypress Lawn Memorial Park

Burial
Text:

Joseph Samuel "Joel" Polack
Birth: Mar. 28, 1807
London
Greater London, England
Death: Apr. 17, 1882
San Francisco
San Francisco County
California, USA
Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Hart Polack (1810 - 1880)*
*Calculated relationship
Note: Moved circa 1946 from Laurel Hill Cemetery, SF
Burial:
Cypress Lawn Memorial Park
Colma
San Mateo County
California, USA

Created by: Cliff Hall
Record added: Apr 29, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 69126165

Family with parents
father
elder sister
17911872
Birth: about 1791
Death: about 1872London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
9 years
elder brother
17991873
Birth: about 1799
Death: June 12, 1873Newtown, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
8 years
himself
18071882
Birth: March 28, 1807 London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: April 17, 1882San Francisco, California, United States
Birth
Immigration
Citation details: The Monitor Fri 13 Apr 1827 p. 4
Text:

Mr. Abraham Polack's brother has arrived in "The Elizabeth" He is an artist of great promise. His forte we understand lies in landscape and architectural sketching and painting. Mrs. S. levey of this Colony, is a constant caller at Mr. Polack's in the Strand, where he was entertained on his first arrival with a splendid entertainment, to meet Mr. Rothschild, jun. Mr Samuels, jun and other gentlemen of the first mercantile respectability. Mr levey paid for his freight in hard cash, and took his cargo into his own stores, by which means he will make some 40 or 50 per cent, more of it, than if hurried to sale in the usual manner.

Immigration
Text:

In 1831 he arrived in New Zealand and settled in Hokianga, exploring the surrounding area as well as Poverty Bay and the East Cape. As such he was one of the first Jews in the colony. In 1832 he moved to Kororareka (now Russell) in the Bay of Islands, establishing a successful general store. In 1835 he built New Zealand's first brewery. Critical of James Busby's weak administration he signed the 1837 petition requesting the British government assume responsibility for the protection and government of European settlers

Immigration
Text:

He returned to England in 1837 and the following year his Kororareka store, which had been used against his wishes to store military and naval explosives, was destroyed in an explosion. He fought unsuccessfully for years for compensation. In 1838 he appeared before a House of Lords Select Committee advocating planned colonisation of New Zealand.[2] He believed that unorganised European settlement would destroy Māori society.[2] He wrote two successful books based on his experiences in New Zealand, which he also illustrated. These books are an invaluable insight into pre-colonial New Zealand

Citation details: Sydney Monitor Wed 12 Dec 1838 p. 2
Text:

NEW ZEALAND: Travels and Adventures during a Residence of Seven Years in that country. By J.S. Polack, Rsq. - Mr. Polack appears to us to be the man of all others calculated to introduce the blessings of civilization among a barbarous and benighted people. He does not startle their prejudices with violent and exasperating opposition, but humours then with apparent tolerance, while he is quietly pursuing a series of measures calculated permanently to reclaim then from vice and grievous ignorance. His researches have been infinitely more extensive than those of any other traveller (Cook included) in the same country, and his pictures of New Zealand "society" (!) are, accordingly more full and curious. In his descriptions of the aspect of the wild land he traversed he frequently rises into poetry, though it is impossible not to see that they are in strict alliance with truth. How strikingly he brings before the eye of the reader the solemn and tangled forests - the vast plains - the deep valleys - the towering headlands, and the rushing rivers of New Zealand - "Naval and Military gazette, copied into the Morn. Chronicle of 21st August". (Mr. Polack, the author of the work above, is the brother of Mr. Abraham Polack of Sydney, and son of Mr. Polack, late of the Strand, an eminent portrait painter, and highly respected in the best society. Mr. Polack arrived in London from New Zealand, just in the nick of time to make his fortune as an author of travels, at all events, to promote his fame...

Immigration
Text:

Polack returned to New Zealand in 1842 but his store was destroyed again in 1845 when Kororareka was sacked by Hone Heke during the Flagstaff War. He moved to Auckland (the new capital) where he operated a bonded warehouse and branched out into shipping, profiting from trade with California. From 1845 to 1848 he was the vice consul for the United States of America.

Death
Text:

In 1850 Polack left New Zealand for California. He settled in San Francisco, where he married Mary, the widow of William Hart (who had both lived in New Zealand). He died on 17 April 1882 (28 Nisan 5642) in San Francisco and was buried in the Laurel Hill cemetery. In 1946 they were moved to the Cypress Lawn Memorial Park

Burial
Text:

Joseph Samuel "Joel" Polack
Birth: Mar. 28, 1807
London
Greater London, England
Death: Apr. 17, 1882
San Francisco
San Francisco County
California, USA
Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Hart Polack (1810 - 1880)*
*Calculated relationship
Note: Moved circa 1946 from Laurel Hill Cemetery, SF
Burial:
Cypress Lawn Memorial Park
Colma
San Mateo County
California, USA

Created by: Cliff Hall
Record added: Apr 29, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 69126165