Sarah Donnelly, 17591849 (aged 90 years)

Name
Sarah /Donnelly/
Given names
Sarah
Surname
Donnelly
Married name
Sarah /Fishburn/
Married name
Sarah /Mellon/
Married name
Sarah /Millen/
Married name
Sarah /Miller/
Married name
Sarah /Millin/
Birth about 1759
Emigration July 9, 1791 (aged 32 years)
Note: Documents in the Hampshire Records Office, England…

Documents in the Hampshire Records Office, England,show that in the Calandar of Prisoners dated 1789, Sarah Donnelly aged 24 had been committed for trial on 15 May 1789 by a William Fletcher Esq. and was brought to Winchester Bridewell prison on the 18 May. She had been charged, on the oath of Ann Everett of Gosport, with feloniously taking and stealing from the shop of Ann Everett and her partner Rebecca Grant, three pieces of ribbon. The ribbon measured 22 yards and was valued at 10 shillings.

Sarah was convicted at Portsmouth Quarter Sessions on 14 Jul 1789 and sentenced to transportation for seven years.

She sailed in the ship 'Mary Ann' which departed England on 16 Feb 1791 and reached Port Jackson on 9 Jul 1791. C.H. Bateston in his book 'Convict Ships' gives the following details;

' In 1791 two vessels carrying convicts sailed independently for Port Jackson. The first, the 'Mary Ann', a ship of 298 tons, was an old vessel built in France in 1772. Commanded by her part owner Mark Munroe, she embarked 150 female convicts, and sailed from England on February 16th. She touched only at St. Jago, where she remained for ten days, and anchored in Port Jackson in July 9th after an uneventful passage of 143 days. This was the fastest passage yet made by a convict ship, but, possibly because she called at only one port en route to refresh her prisoners with fresh provisions, there were nine deaths on the passage - a high mortality rate for a female transport.'

On board ship, Sarah formed a liaison with one of the escort or of the ship's crew, an Alexander Williams.

MarriageAndrew FishburnView this family
May 24, 1795 (aged 36 years)
Religious marriageGeorge MellonView this family
May 21, 1810 (aged 51 years)
Citation details:

No 310

Text:

George Millin of this parish and Sarah Fishburn were married in this church by permission of his Excellency Fovernor Macquarie this twenty first day of may in the year one thousand eight hundred and ten by me Samuel Marsden George Millin signed the register and Sarah made her X mark in the presence of High Owens and Rosetta Owens who both made their X marks

Census November 1828 (aged 69 years)
Text:

Millen, Sarah, 58, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, Protestant, housholder, Windsor Millen, Edward, 22, born in the colony

Occupation
Midwife
January 22, 1831 (aged 72 years)

Note: Extract from The Monitor of 22 January 1831:

Extract from The Monitor of 22 January 1831: "......... Before Mr Justice Stephen and the usual Commission - Sarah Mellon, alias Fishburne, was indicted for killing and slaying a male child at Windsor on 26 September. It appeared in evidence that the prisoner acted as midwife and delivered to Mrs Slaney the infant in question. On the evening of the same day she returned to the house, intoxicated, and taking the child in her arms, gave it two or three pieces of sugar and butter. She then took the child by the heels and gave it two or three shakes. Shortly after the child expired. The doctor gave it as his opinion that the child met its death from bleeding, in consequence of the umbilical cord being negligently tied.... There being no proof of malus animus, the case was put to the jury by the learned judge, who found her not guilty and she was discharged by proclamation after a proper caution in all such future cases ......."1

Death August 15, 1849 (aged 90 years)
Burial August 16, 1849 (1 day after death)
Family with Alexander Williams
partner
herself
17591849
Birth: about 1759Gosport, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Death: August 15, 1849Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
daughter
17911853
Birth: December 21, 1791 32Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 17, 1853Lochinvar, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Andrew Fishburn
husband
17601796
Birth: 1760Whitby, Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: July 23, 1796Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
herself
17591849
Birth: about 1759Gosport, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Death: August 15, 1849Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: May 24, 1795Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-21 months
son
1793
Birth: August 24, 1793 33 34Sydney Cove, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
2 years
son
17951872
Birth: 1795 35 36Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 19, 1872Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Family with George Mellon
husband
Birth:
Death:
herself
17591849
Birth: about 1759Gosport, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Death: August 15, 1849Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: May 21, 1810Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-13 years
son
1797
Birth: September 17, 1797 38Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
4 years
daughter
1802
Birth: January 11, 1802 43Sydney Town, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
19 months
daughter
1803
Birth: August 18, 1803 44Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
son
1806
Birth: July 1, 1806 47Sydney Town, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
Birth[name withheld], 'Charles England' email to Marion Purnell, Nov 2008
MarriageGillen, Mollie. The Founders of Australia: a biographical dictionary of the First Fleet. North Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1989
MarriageAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, St. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Citation details:

No 310

Text:

George Millin of this parish and Sarah Fishburn were married in this church by permission of his Excellency Fovernor Macquarie this twenty first day of may in the year one thousand eight hundred and ten by me Samuel Marsden George Millin signed the register and Sarah made her X mark in the presence of High Owens and Rosetta Owens who both made their X marks

CensusCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Text:

Millen, Sarah, 58, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, Protestant, housholder, Windsor Millen, Edward, 22, born in the colony

Death[name withheld], 'Charles England' email to Marion Purnell, Nov 2008
Burial[name withheld], 'Charles England' email to Marion Purnell, Nov 2008
Emigration

Documents in the Hampshire Records Office, England,show that in the Calandar of Prisoners dated 1789, Sarah Donnelly aged 24 had been committed for trial on 15 May 1789 by a William Fletcher Esq. and was brought to Winchester Bridewell prison on the 18 May. She had been charged, on the oath of Ann Everett of Gosport, with feloniously taking and stealing from the shop of Ann Everett and her partner Rebecca Grant, three pieces of ribbon. The ribbon measured 22 yards and was valued at 10 shillings.

Sarah was convicted at Portsmouth Quarter Sessions on 14 Jul 1789 and sentenced to transportation for seven years.

She sailed in the ship 'Mary Ann' which departed England on 16 Feb 1791 and reached Port Jackson on 9 Jul 1791. C.H. Bateston in his book 'Convict Ships' gives the following details;

' In 1791 two vessels carrying convicts sailed independently for Port Jackson. The first, the 'Mary Ann', a ship of 298 tons, was an old vessel built in France in 1772. Commanded by her part owner Mark Munroe, she embarked 150 female convicts, and sailed from England on February 16th. She touched only at St. Jago, where she remained for ten days, and anchored in Port Jackson in July 9th after an uneventful passage of 143 days. This was the fastest passage yet made by a convict ship, but, possibly because she called at only one port en route to refresh her prisoners with fresh provisions, there were nine deaths on the passage - a high mortality rate for a female transport.'

On board ship, Sarah formed a liaison with one of the escort or of the ship's crew, an Alexander Williams.

Occupation

Extract from The Monitor of 22 January 1831: "......... Before Mr Justice Stephen and the usual Commission - Sarah Mellon, alias Fishburne, was indicted for killing and slaying a male child at Windsor on 26 September. It appeared in evidence that the prisoner acted as midwife and delivered to Mrs Slaney the infant in question. On the evening of the same day she returned to the house, intoxicated, and taking the child in her arms, gave it two or three pieces of sugar and butter. She then took the child by the heels and gave it two or three shakes. Shortly after the child expired. The doctor gave it as his opinion that the child met its death from bleeding, in consequence of the umbilical cord being negligently tied.... There being no proof of malus animus, the case was put to the jury by the learned judge, who found her not guilty and she was discharged by proclamation after a proper caution in all such future cases ......."1