Daniel Brien, 17701837 (aged 67 years)

Name
Daniel /Brien/
Given names
Daniel
Surname
Brien
Birth about 1770
Immigration August 21, 1791 (aged 21 years)
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 112

Text:

Daniel Brian, one of 106 convicts transported on the Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary, January 1791. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years. Vessel: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary. Date of Departure: January 1791. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Source: unknown
Text:

Daniel was convicted of stealing clothes worth £7.6.0/- and sentenced to death. He was put into the Newgate prison, and every month, all of the convicts who were waiting to be hanged were brought up before the Old Bailey, and they were all ordered to be held for another month. It was on 21st February that he received his sentence, and this went on until 19th September, 1789, when they had so many prisoners under sentence of death that they gave all 140 of them a choice of transportation to New South Wales, or the rope. Quite a number preferred to be hanged but, in the end, they were all transported. Daniel Brien accepted transportation for seven years, so that he would be a prisoner in New South Wales until 1796. Although Daniel Brien had been sentenced to death on 21st February, 1787, he missed out on receiving a ticket for the First Fleet which was due to leave for New South Wales on 12th May, 1787, but all the tickets had been issued. The First Fleet did not leave until the next day, for the seamen had all gone on strike. The foundation of Australia was held up by a strike, so strikes are not unusual in our history. They gathered together 24 prisoners for transportation who were waiting in the Newgate Prison, Daniel Brien being No. 6, and they were put on board the small ship "Douglas" in the Thames in December, 1789, and they were taken down to Plymouth where they were all placed aboard the "Dunkirk" hulk, and old warship which was being used as a prison. The "Dunkirk" sometimes held both men and women convicts. The men convicts were probably employed in gangs, to work on or to repair ships of the Royal Navy there. Daniel Brien was kept there on the "Dunkirk" for another fifteen months before a ship was ready to take a large batch of male convicts. This time it was the "Salamander", and she had been fitted up, just like the "Sydney Cove", as a prison, so that, in the case of trouble, only a small number of convicts had to be handled at the one time. Nine ships were eventually collected together for the Third Fleet for Sydney, but they did not sail together. The "Salamander" was a ship of 312 tons, and she left Plymouth on 27th March, 1791 together with the "Atlantic" and the "William and Ann". They were soon scattered in bad weather, and they were not often together, but they all joined up again at Rio de Janeiro on 28th May, and they left together on 12th June. From Rio, this Division sailed directly to Sydney, going down to the level of the Cape of Good Hope and using the Roaring Forties to blow them all the rest of the way to Sydney. The "Atlantic" was the first to arrive on 20th August, 1791, the "Salamander" arriving the next day after a voyage of 147 days, and the "William and Ann" sailed in seven days later. The "Salamander" had been built in a Thames yard in 1776, and she had a cabin and two decks. Five convicts died on the way out. "Salamander" was one of the nine ships, all of which had been provided by the Shipping Agents, Camden, Calvert and King, for £45,000 to take all of those convicts to New South Wales. She left with 106 male convicts on board and delivered 101. On their arrival, they were in a very weak state. They had been carrying enough rations to last them nine months, but they had been on short rations for 21 weeks, so they were given full rations again and rice was on the menu instead of peas. There was an escort of twelve soldiers for the N.S.W. Corps on board, but their Sergeant had deserted on the day on which they left England. Daniel served his sentence and was issued with a Certificate of Freedom on 5 Feb 1811.

Text:

The ship Salamander arrived in the colony 21 Aug 1791

Census 1800 (aged 30 years)
Source: unknown
Text:

The muster has Daniel with hogs, no cattle or horses, with wheat, off stores, one woman and three children on stores.

Census 1806 (aged 36 years)
Note: The muster had Daniel listed as free by servitude, labourer, Parramatta.
Residence 1807 (aged 37 years)

Source: unknown
Text:

Daniel purchased a farm at Prospect. Its first owner was Samuel Harding who was given a Crown Grant of 30 acres, being allotment 163 in the Parish of Prospect on 01 August, 1799. He sold the bottom ten acres to Joseph Kerans for £16 on 01 June, 1804. Kerans (or Kearnes) sold it to Benjamin Carver on12th January, 1806, and Carver sold it to Hugh Doherty on 29th 0ctober, 1806. And Daniel Brien bought the ten acres from Doherty on 23rd February, 1807 for £35. The farm was on Vardey's Road.

Correspondence
Correspondence
1809 (aged 39 years)
Source: unknown
Text:

In the 'Sydney Gazette' of 30 April 1809 there is a notice stating that there were letters awaiting collection by Ann Parker and Daniel Brien, Settler, at the office of the Naval Officer's Assistant at the Hospital Wharf. This is where letters arriving by ship were usually left. There was no postal service, even in England, until the one penny black postage stamp was invented. New South Wales did not have its own stamps until 1850. The letters from England had to be brought out by arrangement with the Master of a ship which was leaving for Australia.

Occupation
Constable
January 13, 1810 (aged 40 years)

Source: unknown
Text:

Daniel was sworn in as constable for the Seven Hills District by Governor Lachlan Macquarie who had just arrived in the Colony. Macquarie set up his own police force to take the place of the military. Police magistrate D'arcy Wentworth, was in charge of the police. Constables wore a blue jacket, a flat cap with a peak, white canvas trousers, and they were armed with a navy cutlass and carried a watchman's rattle. Macquarie had stated 'Our streets frequently exhibited the most disgraceful scenes of rioting, drunkenness, and excesses of every kind, and each morning brought to light the history of thefts, burglaries and depredations which had been committed the night before, Happily such occurrences are now almost totally suppressed, and when an occasional plunder does take place, such is the vigilance of the Police that Justice speedily overtakes the delinquent.' Policemen were expected to call out the time of night during every half hour of their patrol through their district; they were to examine everybody who they might find in the street after gunfire at 9.00 pm, and if they had any suspicions were to take them to the watch house; they were to check on assigned prisoners and quell riots, raise an alarm in any emergency and see the good behaviour of licenced victuallers. They were also to keep a strict eye on houses of ill fame, apprehend drunks, suspects, felons and sly grog sellers. On Sundays they were to deal sternly with all who they might find breaking or profaning the Sabbath day.

Correspondence
Correspondence
October 16, 1813 (aged 43 years)

Source: unknown
Text:

Postmaster Nichols placed a notice in the 'Sydney Gazette' that a letter had arrived for Daniel from England on the ship 'Earl Spencer'.

Occupation
Farmer
July 17, 1816 (aged 46 years)
Note: The Government commenced issuing cattle from the Government herds. They had to be paid for in cash or in wheat at the price of 20 pounds for full grown cows or bullocks. Daniel was no. 8 on the list to attend at the Station at Seven Hills on 17 Jul 1816 to receive the cattle which had been assigned to him. On 12 Jul 1817 he was supplying fresh meat to Government Stores, and was listed to deliver 1,000 pounds under the name of Daniel Bryan.
Property
Randall's Farm
January 15, 1818 (aged 48 years)
Note: Daniel bought another farm, Randall's farm, on the…

Daniel bought another farm, Randall's farm, on the north side of Meurant's Lane. It was 100 acres, Lot 64 in the Parish of Gidley, and it was originally a Crown Grant to William Randall on 13 Jan 1818, which he sold to Daniel Brien three days later.

On 10 Sep 1818, Randall's Farm was measured for him. In the remarks column it states that his residence was at Seven Hills, had a large stock with a large family.

Residence September 10, 1818 (aged 48 years)
Note: On list of persons to receive grants of land in 1818.
MarriageMary Ann ParkerView this family
January 29, 1821 (aged 51 years)
Occupation
Cattle farmer
March 9, 1821 (aged 51 years)
Note: Agency:self employed

Agency:self employed On 9 Mar 1821 Mr D. Brien was listed as delivering 2,000 lbs of meat to Government stores.

Property
Seven Hills, New South Wales, Australia
April 5, 1821 (aged 51 years)

Note: On 5 Apr 1821 Daniel received a further Crown Grant of land on Meurant's Lane, this time on the south side, 110 acres being lot 182 in the Parish of Prospect. He was required to cultivate 20 acres during the ensuing five years. The rent was 2 shillings per acre per year.
Occupation
Landholder
September 14, 1823 (aged 53 years)
Property
Seven Hills, New South Wales, Australia
February 17, 1824 (aged 54 years)

Note: Samuel Beckett was given a Crown grant of 50 acres…

Samuel Beckett was given a Crown grant of 50 acres being Lot 71 in the Parish of Gidley on 13 Jan 1818 and he sold it to Daniel on 17 Feb 1824. It is on the north west corner of the intersection of Meurant's Lane and the Old Windsor Road, and the whole area has now been created into a soccer complex. When the bi-Centenary celebrations for the arrival of Daniel Brien were held in 1991, the whole proceeding took place in the buildings in the soccer complex.

Daniel also became the owner of Pembury's farm which had been a Crown grant to Edward Pembury of 30 acres, lot 70 Parish of Gidley. It lay between Randalls farm and Beckett's farm.

Daniel eventually owned 180 acres on the north side of Meurant's lane and a further 110 acres across the road on the south side.

Occupation
Settler
August 28, 1824 (aged 54 years)
Note: The 'Population Book 1824' lists all of Daniel's e…

The 'Population Book 1824' lists all of Daniel's employees: John Wallace 'Batavia' 1818 William Phillips 'Glory' 1818 Samuel Pyle 'Malabar' 1819 William Lewis 'Atlas' 1816 John Keefe 'Surry' 1819 Richard Durrant 'General Hewitt' 1814 William Browning 'Friendship' 1788 Christopher Bridges 'Surry' 1814. Daniel put in another application for a Crown grant of land. The Rev. Samuel Marsden supported the application, stating: 'This Memorialist has always been an industrious man, has a wife and eight children, and lives upon his Farm, and will make good use of any Land that may be granted to him.'

Occupation
Constable
February 28, 1825 (aged 55 years)

Note: On this date Daniel was recorded as having locked up prisoners Alice Graham and William Bernard. (It was the same day that his daughter Catherine aged 15, married James Foulcher or Hutchins at St. John's Church Parramatta.
Census November 1828 (aged 58 years)
Source: unknown
Text:

Mary Ann Parker and Daniel Brien appeared on the census of 1828 at New South Wales, Australia, and are shown as living at Seven Hills with 300 acres, 50 acres cleared and cultivated, 4 horses and 97 horned cattle. They has 8 children. It also lists three of his convict servants: William Philips aged 31 who had arrived in the 'Glory' in 1817 William Morris aged 22 who had arrived in the 'Princess Royal' in 1823 John Wallace aged 39 who had arrived in the 'Batavia' in 1818. Their sentences were 7 years. In addition there was William Browning aged 70 who had come as a free marine in the First Fleet in the 'Friendship' as his servant.

Text:

Brien, Daniel 59 free by servitude, Salamder, 1791, 7 years Catholic, settler, Seven Hills, 300 acres, 50 cleared and cultivated, 5 horses, 97 horned cattle Brien Brien, Mary A. 39 free by servitude, Sydney Cove 1806 7 years, Catholic Brien, Jane 17 born in the colony Brien, Timothy 15 born in the colony Brien, Mary A. Jr. 13 born in the colony Brien, Daniel Jr. born in the colony Brien, Elizth. 9 born in the colony Brien, Clara 7 born in the colony Brien, John Robt. 5 born in the colony Brien, Sarah 3 born in the colony

Will

Source: unknown
Text:

Daniel left his home and farm on Vardy's Road to Ann for herself, and all the other farms went to the four boys, but she had an interest in them while she lived. Timothy received Randall's farm. Daniel Jr. received Beckett's farm and he sold it to his brother Timothy for 200 pounds on 3rd Oct 1859. John Robert Brien was given the 110 acres on the south side of Meurant's Lane and he sold that to his brother James for 250 pounds. Pembury's farm went to son James Brien.

Death August 22, 1837 (aged 67 years)

There is no official record of Daniel's death except for Index of Probate Applications.

Family with Mary Ann Parker
himself
17701837
Birth: about 1770England, United Kingdom
Death: August 22, 1837Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
wife
17891865
Birth: about 1789England, United Kingdom
Death: July 14, 1865
Marriage
Marriage: January 29, 1821Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-11 years
daughter
18091832
Birth: October 19, 1809 39 20Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 11, 1832Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
19 months
daughter
18111894
Birth: May 19, 1811 41 22Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 7, 1894Wodonga, High Country, Victoria, Australia
2 years
son
Brien, Timothy (1813-1897) and Gilbert, Charlotte (1814-1862)
18131897
Birth: July 3, 1813 43 24Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: January 15, 1897Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18151876
Birth: September 21, 1815 45 26Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 19, 1876Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
22 months
son
18171878
Birth: July 17, 1817 47 28Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1878Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18191909
Birth: September 26, 1819 49 30Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 13, 1909Kellyville, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18211899
Birth: November 10, 1821 51 32Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 6, 1899Wagga Wagga, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
Brien, John Robert (1823-1895)
18231895
Birth: November 11, 1823 53 34Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1895Rouse Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
1825
Birth: December 1, 1825 55 36Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
4 years
son
Brien, James (1829-1919)
18291919
Birth: December 26, 1829 59 40Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 5, 1919Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia
2 years
daughter
Brien, Eleanor Grace (1832-1926)
18321926
Birth: March 8, 1832 62 43Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 30, 1926Howlong, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
William Henry Smith + Mary Ann Parker
partner’s partner
1873
Birth:
Death: May 7, 1873Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
wife
17891865
Birth: about 1789England, United Kingdom
Death: July 14, 1865
Marriage
Marriage: October 8, 1839Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 112

Text:

Daniel Brian, one of 106 convicts transported on the Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary, January 1791. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years. Vessel: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary. Date of Departure: January 1791. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Immigrationunknown
Text:

Daniel was convicted of stealing clothes worth £7.6.0/- and sentenced to death. He was put into the Newgate prison, and every month, all of the convicts who were waiting to be hanged were brought up before the Old Bailey, and they were all ordered to be held for another month. It was on 21st February that he received his sentence, and this went on until 19th September, 1789, when they had so many prisoners under sentence of death that they gave all 140 of them a choice of transportation to New South Wales, or the rope. Quite a number preferred to be hanged but, in the end, they were all transported. Daniel Brien accepted transportation for seven years, so that he would be a prisoner in New South Wales until 1796. Although Daniel Brien had been sentenced to death on 21st February, 1787, he missed out on receiving a ticket for the First Fleet which was due to leave for New South Wales on 12th May, 1787, but all the tickets had been issued. The First Fleet did not leave until the next day, for the seamen had all gone on strike. The foundation of Australia was held up by a strike, so strikes are not unusual in our history. They gathered together 24 prisoners for transportation who were waiting in the Newgate Prison, Daniel Brien being No. 6, and they were put on board the small ship "Douglas" in the Thames in December, 1789, and they were taken down to Plymouth where they were all placed aboard the "Dunkirk" hulk, and old warship which was being used as a prison. The "Dunkirk" sometimes held both men and women convicts. The men convicts were probably employed in gangs, to work on or to repair ships of the Royal Navy there. Daniel Brien was kept there on the "Dunkirk" for another fifteen months before a ship was ready to take a large batch of male convicts. This time it was the "Salamander", and she had been fitted up, just like the "Sydney Cove", as a prison, so that, in the case of trouble, only a small number of convicts had to be handled at the one time. Nine ships were eventually collected together for the Third Fleet for Sydney, but they did not sail together. The "Salamander" was a ship of 312 tons, and she left Plymouth on 27th March, 1791 together with the "Atlantic" and the "William and Ann". They were soon scattered in bad weather, and they were not often together, but they all joined up again at Rio de Janeiro on 28th May, and they left together on 12th June. From Rio, this Division sailed directly to Sydney, going down to the level of the Cape of Good Hope and using the Roaring Forties to blow them all the rest of the way to Sydney. The "Atlantic" was the first to arrive on 20th August, 1791, the "Salamander" arriving the next day after a voyage of 147 days, and the "William and Ann" sailed in seven days later. The "Salamander" had been built in a Thames yard in 1776, and she had a cabin and two decks. Five convicts died on the way out. "Salamander" was one of the nine ships, all of which had been provided by the Shipping Agents, Camden, Calvert and King, for £45,000 to take all of those convicts to New South Wales. She left with 106 male convicts on board and delivered 101. On their arrival, they were in a very weak state. They had been carrying enough rations to last them nine months, but they had been on short rations for 21 weeks, so they were given full rations again and rice was on the menu instead of peas. There was an escort of twelve soldiers for the N.S.W. Corps on board, but their Sergeant had deserted on the day on which they left England. Daniel served his sentence and was issued with a Certificate of Freedom on 5 Feb 1811.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Text:

The ship Salamander arrived in the colony 21 Aug 1791

Censusunknown
Text:

The muster has Daniel with hogs, no cattle or horses, with wheat, off stores, one woman and three children on stores.

Residenceunknown
Text:

Daniel purchased a farm at Prospect. Its first owner was Samuel Harding who was given a Crown Grant of 30 acres, being allotment 163 in the Parish of Prospect on 01 August, 1799. He sold the bottom ten acres to Joseph Kerans for £16 on 01 June, 1804. Kerans (or Kearnes) sold it to Benjamin Carver on12th January, 1806, and Carver sold it to Hugh Doherty on 29th 0ctober, 1806. And Daniel Brien bought the ten acres from Doherty on 23rd February, 1807 for £35. The farm was on Vardey's Road.

Correspondenceunknown
Text:

In the 'Sydney Gazette' of 30 April 1809 there is a notice stating that there were letters awaiting collection by Ann Parker and Daniel Brien, Settler, at the office of the Naval Officer's Assistant at the Hospital Wharf. This is where letters arriving by ship were usually left. There was no postal service, even in England, until the one penny black postage stamp was invented. New South Wales did not have its own stamps until 1850. The letters from England had to be brought out by arrangement with the Master of a ship which was leaving for Australia.

Occupationunknown
Text:

Daniel was sworn in as constable for the Seven Hills District by Governor Lachlan Macquarie who had just arrived in the Colony. Macquarie set up his own police force to take the place of the military. Police magistrate D'arcy Wentworth, was in charge of the police. Constables wore a blue jacket, a flat cap with a peak, white canvas trousers, and they were armed with a navy cutlass and carried a watchman's rattle. Macquarie had stated 'Our streets frequently exhibited the most disgraceful scenes of rioting, drunkenness, and excesses of every kind, and each morning brought to light the history of thefts, burglaries and depredations which had been committed the night before, Happily such occurrences are now almost totally suppressed, and when an occasional plunder does take place, such is the vigilance of the Police that Justice speedily overtakes the delinquent.' Policemen were expected to call out the time of night during every half hour of their patrol through their district; they were to examine everybody who they might find in the street after gunfire at 9.00 pm, and if they had any suspicions were to take them to the watch house; they were to check on assigned prisoners and quell riots, raise an alarm in any emergency and see the good behaviour of licenced victuallers. They were also to keep a strict eye on houses of ill fame, apprehend drunks, suspects, felons and sly grog sellers. On Sundays they were to deal sternly with all who they might find breaking or profaning the Sabbath day.

Correspondenceunknown
Text:

Postmaster Nichols placed a notice in the 'Sydney Gazette' that a letter had arrived for Daniel from England on the ship 'Earl Spencer'.

ResidenceNew South Wales. State Records Office. Colonial Secretary's Index 1788-1825 [on-line]
OccupationNew South Wales. State Records Office. Colonial Secretary's Index 1788-1825 [on-line]
OccupationNew South Wales. State Records Office. Colonial Secretary's Index 1788-1825 [on-line]
Censusunknown
Text:

Mary Ann Parker and Daniel Brien appeared on the census of 1828 at New South Wales, Australia, and are shown as living at Seven Hills with 300 acres, 50 acres cleared and cultivated, 4 horses and 97 horned cattle. They has 8 children. It also lists three of his convict servants: William Philips aged 31 who had arrived in the 'Glory' in 1817 William Morris aged 22 who had arrived in the 'Princess Royal' in 1823 John Wallace aged 39 who had arrived in the 'Batavia' in 1818. Their sentences were 7 years. In addition there was William Browning aged 70 who had come as a free marine in the First Fleet in the 'Friendship' as his servant.

CensusAncestry.com. 1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Text:

Brien, Daniel 59 free by servitude, Salamder, 1791, 7 years Catholic, settler, Seven Hills, 300 acres, 50 cleared and cultivated, 5 horses, 97 horned cattle Brien Brien, Mary A. 39 free by servitude, Sydney Cove 1806 7 years, Catholic Brien, Jane 17 born in the colony Brien, Timothy 15 born in the colony Brien, Mary A. Jr. 13 born in the colony Brien, Daniel Jr. born in the colony Brien, Elizth. 9 born in the colony Brien, Clara 7 born in the colony Brien, John Robt. 5 born in the colony Brien, Sarah 3 born in the colony

Willunknown
Text:

Daniel left his home and farm on Vardy's Road to Ann for herself, and all the other farms went to the four boys, but she had an interest in them while she lived. Timothy received Randall's farm. Daniel Jr. received Beckett's farm and he sold it to his brother Timothy for 200 pounds on 3rd Oct 1859. John Robert Brien was given the 110 acres on the south side of Meurant's Lane and he sold that to his brother James for 250 pounds. Pembury's farm went to son James Brien.

Census

The muster had Daniel listed as free by servitude, labourer, Parramatta.

Occupation

The Government commenced issuing cattle from the Government herds. They had to be paid for in cash or in wheat at the price of 20 pounds for full grown cows or bullocks. Daniel was no. 8 on the list to attend at the Station at Seven Hills on 17 Jul 1816 to receive the cattle which had been assigned to him. On 12 Jul 1817 he was supplying fresh meat to Government Stores, and was listed to deliver 1,000 pounds under the name of Daniel Bryan.

Property

Daniel bought another farm, Randall's farm, on the north side of Meurant's Lane. It was 100 acres, Lot 64 in the Parish of Gidley, and it was originally a Crown Grant to William Randall on 13 Jan 1818, which he sold to Daniel Brien three days later.

On 10 Sep 1818, Randall's Farm was measured for him. In the remarks column it states that his residence was at Seven Hills, had a large stock with a large family.

Residence

On list of persons to receive grants of land in 1818.

Occupation

Agency:self employed On 9 Mar 1821 Mr D. Brien was listed as delivering 2,000 lbs of meat to Government stores.

Property

On 5 Apr 1821 Daniel received a further Crown Grant of land on Meurant's Lane, this time on the south side, 110 acres being lot 182 in the Parish of Prospect. He was required to cultivate 20 acres during the ensuing five years. The rent was 2 shillings per acre per year.

Property

Samuel Beckett was given a Crown grant of 50 acres being Lot 71 in the Parish of Gidley on 13 Jan 1818 and he sold it to Daniel on 17 Feb 1824. It is on the north west corner of the intersection of Meurant's Lane and the Old Windsor Road, and the whole area has now been created into a soccer complex. When the bi-Centenary celebrations for the arrival of Daniel Brien were held in 1991, the whole proceeding took place in the buildings in the soccer complex.

Daniel also became the owner of Pembury's farm which had been a Crown grant to Edward Pembury of 30 acres, lot 70 Parish of Gidley. It lay between Randalls farm and Beckett's farm.

Daniel eventually owned 180 acres on the north side of Meurant's lane and a further 110 acres across the road on the south side.

Occupation

The 'Population Book 1824' lists all of Daniel's employees: John Wallace 'Batavia' 1818 William Phillips 'Glory' 1818 Samuel Pyle 'Malabar' 1819 William Lewis 'Atlas' 1816 John Keefe 'Surry' 1819 Richard Durrant 'General Hewitt' 1814 William Browning 'Friendship' 1788 Christopher Bridges 'Surry' 1814. Daniel put in another application for a Crown grant of land. The Rev. Samuel Marsden supported the application, stating: 'This Memorialist has always been an industrious man, has a wife and eight children, and lives upon his Farm, and will make good use of any Land that may be granted to him.'

Occupation

On this date Daniel was recorded as having locked up prisoners Alice Graham and William Bernard. (It was the same day that his daughter Catherine aged 15, married James Foulcher or Hutchins at St. John's Church Parramatta.

DeathView

There is no official record of Daniel's death except for Index of Probate Applications.