William Henry Smith, 1873

Name
William Henry /Smith/
Given names
William Henry
Surname
Smith
Birth

Immigration February 7, 1814
Note: He was a goldsmith and jeweller by trade, aged abo…

He was a goldsmith and jeweller by trade, aged about 20, and, at night on 4th, April, 1813, in Central London, he was one of four young men who jostled another young fellow in the street. One of these men picked the gold watch from the pocket of this man, and they ran off with it, the thief handing the watch over to Smith. There was a cry of "Stop. Thief", and other young men gave chase. One saw Smith throw the watch through bars of a fence, and Smith was caught and the watch recovered. It was valued at 40/-, the chain at 2/- and the key at 6d.

Street robbery was a serious crime, and Smith was quickly put up for trial before a Judge and Jury in the Old Bailey in London on 7th April 1813, when he was found guilty of stealing, but not with violence, and he was ordered to be transported for life. He arrived in New South Wales by the convict transport "General Hewitt" on 7th. February, 1814. Eventually he was given a Ticket of Leave.

The old Bailey transcript:

WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Alexander Smith , in the King's Highway, on the 4th of April , and taking from his person, a watch, value 40 s. a watch chain, value 2 s. and a watch key, value 6 d. his property.

ALEXANDER SMITH . I am a cabinet maker . I live at 22, Pitt-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the night of the 4th of April, four men came up to me, and began to shove me with their elbows, jostling me from one side to the other. They pulled my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did they strike you at all - A. No, they did not. I was in company with two young men; they went away. I was following them. They came up to me, and said, these two gentleman wanted to insult you. I said, they did not want to insult me. They then hustled me about from one side to the other, and one of them took my watch from me. I immediately seized the man that took my watch from me, and I saw him give it into the prisoner's hand. It was not the prisoner that took my watch. I ran after the prisoner, and cried, stop thief. The prisoner ran up Oxford-road. I ran until I was stopped by a young man that picked up the case of a watch. I I lost sight of the prisoner. I have seen the watch since.

- HALL. I am clerk to Mr. Shuter, a barrister. On this night I was coming down Oxford-road; I heard the cry of stop thief. I perceived two people running very hard towards me. I stepped of oneside, and let the headmost one pass me. That was the prisoner. I turned, and ran after him. After getting the distance of seven or eight houses I perceived him put his hand down his right side, and threw something down the railing of an ironmongers shop; it ran on the pavement. The witness, Lewellin, who was running after him, turned back. I still continued after him, and seeing the prisoner was going to run up Hanway-yard, I seized him. A watchman came up. I led him to the spot where I saw him throw this something down. I still held him. Lewellin then shewed me the case of a watch. We knocked at the ironmonger's shop door. The prosecutor went down to see if they could find the watch in the area. I was standing outside, I saw Lewellin pick the watch up through the iron bars. The prisoner was then taken to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM LEWELLIN . I am a tailor. On Sunday night, the 4th of April, I heard the cry of stop thief, about eleven o'clock. I ran to the middle of the road. I observed a man coming as hard as he could run. He turned to Oxford-road. I ran after him, and about four yards in Oxford-road he fell down. He very soon got up, and run on. I ran after him until he got to the founders; I was then within a yard of him. I observed him put his hand in his pocket, take out the watch, and throw it down the area. I picked up the case. I pursued him, and I saw him stopped by Mr. Hall. I returned back to where I picked up the case. The watchman rang the bell. The watchman, I, and the prosecutor, went down. I found the watch in the cellar.

- NEWBURY. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. The watch and case were given to me. I produce it.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MarriageMary Ann ParkerView this family
October 8, 1839
Death May 7, 1873
Cause of death: Pneumonia

He died from pneumonia on 7th May, 1873 at the age of 80 years in the Government Asylum at Parramatta, and he was also buried in St. John's Cemetery.

Family with Mary Ann Parker
himself
1873
Birth:
Death: May 7, 1873Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
wife
17891865
Birth: about 1789England, United Kingdom
Death: July 14, 1865
Marriage
Marriage: October 8, 1839Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Daniel Brien + Mary Ann Parker
partner’s partner
17701837
Birth: about 1770England, United Kingdom
Death: August 22, 1837Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
wife
17891865
Birth: about 1789England, United Kingdom
Death: July 14, 1865
Marriage
Marriage: January 29, 1821Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-11 years
step-daughter
18091832
Birth: October 19, 1809 39 20Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 11, 1832Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
19 months
step-daughter
18111894
Birth: May 19, 1811 41 22Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 7, 1894Wodonga, High Country, Victoria, Australia
2 years
step-son
Brien, Timothy (1813-1897) and Gilbert, Charlotte (1814-1862)
18131897
Birth: July 3, 1813 43 24Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: January 15, 1897Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18151876
Birth: September 21, 1815 45 26Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 19, 1876Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
22 months
step-son
18171878
Birth: July 17, 1817 47 28Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1878Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18191909
Birth: September 26, 1819 49 30Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 13, 1909Kellyville, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18211899
Birth: November 10, 1821 51 32Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 6, 1899Wagga Wagga, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-son
Brien, John Robert (1823-1895)
18231895
Birth: November 11, 1823 53 34Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 27, 1895Rouse Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
1825
Birth: December 1, 1825 55 36Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
4 years
step-son
Brien, James (1829-1919)
18291919
Birth: December 26, 1829 59 40Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 5, 1919Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
Brien, Eleanor Grace (1832-1926)
18321926
Birth: March 8, 1832 62 43Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 30, 1926Howlong, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Immigration

He was a goldsmith and jeweller by trade, aged about 20, and, at night on 4th, April, 1813, in Central London, he was one of four young men who jostled another young fellow in the street. One of these men picked the gold watch from the pocket of this man, and they ran off with it, the thief handing the watch over to Smith. There was a cry of "Stop. Thief", and other young men gave chase. One saw Smith throw the watch through bars of a fence, and Smith was caught and the watch recovered. It was valued at 40/-, the chain at 2/- and the key at 6d.

Street robbery was a serious crime, and Smith was quickly put up for trial before a Judge and Jury in the Old Bailey in London on 7th April 1813, when he was found guilty of stealing, but not with violence, and he was ordered to be transported for life. He arrived in New South Wales by the convict transport "General Hewitt" on 7th. February, 1814. Eventually he was given a Ticket of Leave.

The old Bailey transcript:

WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Alexander Smith , in the King's Highway, on the 4th of April , and taking from his person, a watch, value 40 s. a watch chain, value 2 s. and a watch key, value 6 d. his property.

ALEXANDER SMITH . I am a cabinet maker . I live at 22, Pitt-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the night of the 4th of April, four men came up to me, and began to shove me with their elbows, jostling me from one side to the other. They pulled my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did they strike you at all - A. No, they did not. I was in company with two young men; they went away. I was following them. They came up to me, and said, these two gentleman wanted to insult you. I said, they did not want to insult me. They then hustled me about from one side to the other, and one of them took my watch from me. I immediately seized the man that took my watch from me, and I saw him give it into the prisoner's hand. It was not the prisoner that took my watch. I ran after the prisoner, and cried, stop thief. The prisoner ran up Oxford-road. I ran until I was stopped by a young man that picked up the case of a watch. I I lost sight of the prisoner. I have seen the watch since.

- HALL. I am clerk to Mr. Shuter, a barrister. On this night I was coming down Oxford-road; I heard the cry of stop thief. I perceived two people running very hard towards me. I stepped of oneside, and let the headmost one pass me. That was the prisoner. I turned, and ran after him. After getting the distance of seven or eight houses I perceived him put his hand down his right side, and threw something down the railing of an ironmongers shop; it ran on the pavement. The witness, Lewellin, who was running after him, turned back. I still continued after him, and seeing the prisoner was going to run up Hanway-yard, I seized him. A watchman came up. I led him to the spot where I saw him throw this something down. I still held him. Lewellin then shewed me the case of a watch. We knocked at the ironmonger's shop door. The prosecutor went down to see if they could find the watch in the area. I was standing outside, I saw Lewellin pick the watch up through the iron bars. The prisoner was then taken to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM LEWELLIN . I am a tailor. On Sunday night, the 4th of April, I heard the cry of stop thief, about eleven o'clock. I ran to the middle of the road. I observed a man coming as hard as he could run. He turned to Oxford-road. I ran after him, and about four yards in Oxford-road he fell down. He very soon got up, and run on. I ran after him until he got to the founders; I was then within a yard of him. I observed him put his hand in his pocket, take out the watch, and throw it down the area. I picked up the case. I pursued him, and I saw him stopped by Mr. Hall. I returned back to where I picked up the case. The watchman rang the bell. The watchman, I, and the prosecutor, went down. I found the watch in the cellar.

- NEWBURY. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. The watch and case were given to me. I produce it.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

DeathView

He died from pneumonia on 7th May, 1873 at the age of 80 years in the Government Asylum at Parramatta, and he was also buried in St. John's Cemetery.