Mary Browning, 17801835 (aged 55 years)

Name
Mary /Browning/
Given names
Mary
Surname
Browning
Name
Mary /Goodwin/
Type of name
married name
Birth
about 1780
Marriage
estimated 1804 (aged 24 years)
Immigration
Citation details: Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 35 (19)
Text:

Mary Browning, one of 299 convicts transported on the Admiral Gambier and the ship Friends, April 1811.
Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years on 11 April 1810.
Vessel: Admiral Gambier and Friends.
Date of Departure: April 1811.
Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Citation details: Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 08 November 2014), April 1810, trial of MARY BROWNING (t18100411-49).
Text:

MARY BROWNING, Violent Theft > highway robbery, 11th April 1810.
309. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael Myers, in the kings highway, on the 10th of March, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. his property.
MICHAEL MYERS. I live at No. 9, James-street, in the Haymarket; I am a glass cutter; I work for Mr. Wheeler, No. 8, Leather-lane. On Friday night, the 16th of March, I had spent my evening at a public house in Leather-lane, I was rather the worse for liquor: and at twelve o'clock I was returning home through Long Acre, I was met by the prisoner and another, she was very different in habit then; I did not speak to them; I was walking along as fast as I could, the prisoner came before me and asked me where I was going, I told her, home; she laid hold of my arm and walked three or four paces with me, the other woman staid behind. The prisoner got me on the opposite side of the way in Long Acre, she asked me to go with her, I refused; she there pulled me on a step of a door.
Q. I suppose half lovingly and half violently - A. I suppose that was the case on her side. She sat herself by the side of me; I walked on to the former side of the street to perform my former course, I did not perceive her following me till I reached the pathway; we came near to the corner of James-street, leading to Covent Garden, she till trying to persuade me to go with her, she caught hold of my arm by the side of her and drew me half towards her, near to an area railing, then I instantly missed something; I clapped my hand upon my side and missed my watch; the prisoner immediately ran away across Long Acre, and the first house she came to she put the watch down the area. I was close to her, pursuing her, I caught hold of her by her upper garment, she tore away and left her handkerchief in my hand; I pursued her, she was taken in custody by a watchman that came up; by that time the other woman came up, I gave charge of her. My watch is in charge of the watchhouse keeper, the watchman and watchhouse-keeper got it out of the area.
JONATHAN M'DOWELL. I am a watchman. About the hour of twelve I heard a scuffle, when I got up to it I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner, the prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of his watch, he said, she had put it down an area. I afterwards found the watch by his directions. I took charge of the women. Mr. Roberts has the watch.
- ROBERTS. Q. Was this woman brought to in charge by the prosecutor - A. Yes; and by his directions I found the watch; I have had it ever since.
The property produced and identified.
Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Long Acre, this man took me by the arm, he said he should wish to go home with me, I told him I was not fit; he was quite intoxicated; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him I could not drink any thing, and as we were coming up Belton-street he staggered and let the watch fall, I picked it up; he got hold of me and tore me all to pieces; he drew his knife out and cut me after he knocked me down; I got up and ran away. When the watchman catched hold of me, I said, do not hold me, he pulled out the watch, and I will tell you where it is.
M'Dowell. The prisoner was not cut; she had cut her hand by a fall on the stones.
GUILTY, aged 31.
Of stealing, but not violently from the person.
Transported for Seven Years.
Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Text:

The ship Friends arrived in NSW 10 Oct 1811

Religious marriage
Text:

Married at St Matthews 31 Aug 1812

Text:

Name: Edward Goodwin
Spouse Name: Mary Browning
Marriage Date: 1812
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Windsor, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1812
Volume Number: V A

Census
Text:

Browning, Mary, free by servitude, Friends, wife of E. Goodwin, Windsor
3 un-named children of M. Browning
Goodwin, Edward, ticket of leave, Indian, life, landholder, Windsor

Marriage
Text:

Common law relationship. In the 1822 muster Mary Browning was recorded as with her husband Edward Goodwin, but by 1825 she was recorded as living with Michael Connor.

Census
Citation details: 1825 muster
Text:

Browning, Mary, free by servitude, Friends, 1811, 7 years, lives with Michael Connor, Richmond
Browning Edward 11, born in the colony, son of Mary Browning, Richmond
Browning, Mary, 9, born in the colony, daughter of above
Browning, David, 7, son of above
[Connor, Michael, free by servitude, Cornwallis, 1796, 7 years, landholder, Richmond
also
Connor, Michael, conditional pardon, Scarborough, 1788, life, constable, Richmond]

Charged with robbery
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, William Browning and James Yew were severally charged with a robbery. Committed for trial at sessions.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Windsor Quarter Sessions...
Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, Wm. Browning and James Yaw were discharged by Proclamation.

Drunk and disorderly
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Fri 27 Apr 1827 p. 3
Text:

WINDSOR...
APRIL 14...
Mary Goodwin was charged with being drunk and a little disorderly. Mary is an elderly woman; her son was ordered for transportation two days ago; she had travelled twelve miles to say "farewell;" acquaintances more frequently invite to "the bottle" than "the board;" she had drunk too freely, the effects are common. Mary, you are this time to be pitied. Fined five shillings to the poor, but being unable to pay, was allowed a few days to make up the fine - "god bless you, gentlemen, Micky Conner will pay you!"

Fined for assault
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Mon 6 Aug 1827 p. 3
Text:

Joseph Spiturniy, commonly called "Maltese Joe", had caused Mary Goodwin to be brought before their Worships by a warrant, to answer the complaint of having disabled his arm, and other parts of his body, and other wrongs to the said "Joseph" that she had done, contrary to the peace of our Lord the King. Instead of bringing Mary to Court, an Englishman would have courted her, but "Maltese Joe" cannot hear that "Little Micky Connor" should be his rival. Old people are foolish as well as young ones, in their way. Mary ordered to find securities to keep the peace - Micky Connor, at her elbow, performed the kind office of surety, and sure he could do no more for her; but Tim Connor with a friendly air came forward, and paid the fees. There is true friendship in these little matters among poor people, and Mary knows how to express her gratitude.

Sent to factory
Citation details: The Monitor (Sydney) Wed 23 Apr 1828 p. 8
Text:

Mary Goodwin, a hoary-headed sinner, was in a state of inebriation when put to the bar, and during her trial could not refrain from giving the Bench and the auditors a specimen of the low state into which a daughter of Eve may fall, when rendered the victim of decrepid old age, rags, and extreme vice - Guilty - To be kept nine months hard labour in the Factory.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Mon 21 Apr 1828 p. 2
Text:

Mary Goodwin was indicted for assaulting Richard Keefe. This notorious old vagabond has made her appearance before the Police Court ___ and often, and been frequently forgiven, fined and confined. The complainant had detected her in the open road in criminal connection, and disturbed her, but left her to herself for the night, there not being any watch house within four miles, but as soon as she had found herself sufficiently at leisure, she followed complainant to a neighbour's house, and there assaulted him with sticks and stones, so that his life was greatly despaired of ; and true it is he was near unto death, for it was in the house of Ambrose Death the charge of brickbats took place. This vagabond woman appeared in court in a beastly state of drunkenness, her grey hairs exposed by the cap falling off her head; she used horrid expressions as she stood in the dock, and displayed the most shocking depravity of heart and mind. Gulity. Sentence: to be confined in the Factory and there ne kept to hard labour in Class no 3, for the term of nine calendar months.

Census
Text:

Goodwin, Mary, 50, free by servitude, Friends, 7 years, Catholic, factory, Parramatta

Placed in stocks
Citation details: Sydney Herald Mon 11 Jun 1832 p. 4
Text:

POLICE INCIDENTS.
THURSDAY. - Mary Goodwin, who bore a strong resemblance to a dried haddock, was placed at the bar charged with "maxing" it.
Bench. - Have you five shillings? Mary - No, blunt's very scarce!
Bench. - Then how your pretty face in the stocks for three hours.

Death
Text:

Name: Mary Goodwin
Death Date: 1835
Death Place: New South Wales
Registration Year: 1835
Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales
Volume Number: V18352051 19

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 3 Jan 1835 p. 2
Text:

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Thursday last an inquest was held at the St. patrick, Cambridge-street, on the body of Mary Goodwin, aged 55 years, who fell down on the previous evening, in Harrington-street, in a state of intoxication. She was immediately conveyed to her home in Cumberland-street, where she died in a few minutes after. Her daughter corroborated the evidence of her neighbours, as to the fact of her excessive indulgence in the use of ardent spirits, and also stated that she had been sometimes afflicted with asthma, which complaint the surgeon, Mr. Nicholson, firmly believed had been occasioned by an intemperate use of strong liquors. Verdict - "Died by the visitation of God".

Family with James
husband
herself
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriageestimated 1804
3 years
daughter
18061864
Birth: about 1806 26
Death: May 28, 1864New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
1807
Birth: about 1807 27
Death:
Family with Edward Goodwin
husband
Birth:
Death:
herself
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Religious marriage Religious marriageAugust 31, 1812Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
18141894
Birth: about 1814 34 New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1894Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
1816
Birth: about 1816 36 New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
son
18181858
Birth: about 1818 38 New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 17, 1858Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Michael Connor
husband
17801853
Birth: about 1780
Death: estimated 1853Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
herself
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriageabout 1824New South Wales, Australia
Birth
Immigration
Citation details: Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 35 (19)
Text:

Mary Browning, one of 299 convicts transported on the Admiral Gambier and the ship Friends, April 1811.
Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years on 11 April 1810.
Vessel: Admiral Gambier and Friends.
Date of Departure: April 1811.
Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Citation details: Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 08 November 2014), April 1810, trial of MARY BROWNING (t18100411-49).
Text:

MARY BROWNING, Violent Theft > highway robbery, 11th April 1810.
309. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael Myers, in the kings highway, on the 10th of March, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. his property.
MICHAEL MYERS. I live at No. 9, James-street, in the Haymarket; I am a glass cutter; I work for Mr. Wheeler, No. 8, Leather-lane. On Friday night, the 16th of March, I had spent my evening at a public house in Leather-lane, I was rather the worse for liquor: and at twelve o'clock I was returning home through Long Acre, I was met by the prisoner and another, she was very different in habit then; I did not speak to them; I was walking along as fast as I could, the prisoner came before me and asked me where I was going, I told her, home; she laid hold of my arm and walked three or four paces with me, the other woman staid behind. The prisoner got me on the opposite side of the way in Long Acre, she asked me to go with her, I refused; she there pulled me on a step of a door.
Q. I suppose half lovingly and half violently - A. I suppose that was the case on her side. She sat herself by the side of me; I walked on to the former side of the street to perform my former course, I did not perceive her following me till I reached the pathway; we came near to the corner of James-street, leading to Covent Garden, she till trying to persuade me to go with her, she caught hold of my arm by the side of her and drew me half towards her, near to an area railing, then I instantly missed something; I clapped my hand upon my side and missed my watch; the prisoner immediately ran away across Long Acre, and the first house she came to she put the watch down the area. I was close to her, pursuing her, I caught hold of her by her upper garment, she tore away and left her handkerchief in my hand; I pursued her, she was taken in custody by a watchman that came up; by that time the other woman came up, I gave charge of her. My watch is in charge of the watchhouse keeper, the watchman and watchhouse-keeper got it out of the area.
JONATHAN M'DOWELL. I am a watchman. About the hour of twelve I heard a scuffle, when I got up to it I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner, the prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of his watch, he said, she had put it down an area. I afterwards found the watch by his directions. I took charge of the women. Mr. Roberts has the watch.
- ROBERTS. Q. Was this woman brought to in charge by the prosecutor - A. Yes; and by his directions I found the watch; I have had it ever since.
The property produced and identified.
Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Long Acre, this man took me by the arm, he said he should wish to go home with me, I told him I was not fit; he was quite intoxicated; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him I could not drink any thing, and as we were coming up Belton-street he staggered and let the watch fall, I picked it up; he got hold of me and tore me all to pieces; he drew his knife out and cut me after he knocked me down; I got up and ran away. When the watchman catched hold of me, I said, do not hold me, he pulled out the watch, and I will tell you where it is.
M'Dowell. The prisoner was not cut; she had cut her hand by a fall on the stones.
GUILTY, aged 31.
Of stealing, but not violently from the person.
Transported for Seven Years.
Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Text:

The ship Friends arrived in NSW 10 Oct 1811

Religious marriage
Text:

Married at St Matthews 31 Aug 1812

Text:

Name: Edward Goodwin
Spouse Name: Mary Browning
Marriage Date: 1812
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Windsor, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1812
Volume Number: V A

Census
Text:

Browning, Mary, free by servitude, Friends, wife of E. Goodwin, Windsor
3 un-named children of M. Browning
Goodwin, Edward, ticket of leave, Indian, life, landholder, Windsor

Marriage
Text:

Common law relationship. In the 1822 muster Mary Browning was recorded as with her husband Edward Goodwin, but by 1825 she was recorded as living with Michael Connor.

Census
Citation details: 1825 muster
Text:

Browning, Mary, free by servitude, Friends, 1811, 7 years, lives with Michael Connor, Richmond
Browning Edward 11, born in the colony, son of Mary Browning, Richmond
Browning, Mary, 9, born in the colony, daughter of above
Browning, David, 7, son of above
[Connor, Michael, free by servitude, Cornwallis, 1796, 7 years, landholder, Richmond
also
Connor, Michael, conditional pardon, Scarborough, 1788, life, constable, Richmond]

Charged with robbery
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, William Browning and James Yew were severally charged with a robbery. Committed for trial at sessions.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Windsor Quarter Sessions...
Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, Wm. Browning and James Yaw were discharged by Proclamation.

Drunk and disorderly
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Fri 27 Apr 1827 p. 3
Text:

WINDSOR...
APRIL 14...
Mary Goodwin was charged with being drunk and a little disorderly. Mary is an elderly woman; her son was ordered for transportation two days ago; she had travelled twelve miles to say "farewell;" acquaintances more frequently invite to "the bottle" than "the board;" she had drunk too freely, the effects are common. Mary, you are this time to be pitied. Fined five shillings to the poor, but being unable to pay, was allowed a few days to make up the fine - "god bless you, gentlemen, Micky Conner will pay you!"

Fined for assault
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Mon 6 Aug 1827 p. 3
Text:

Joseph Spiturniy, commonly called "Maltese Joe", had caused Mary Goodwin to be brought before their Worships by a warrant, to answer the complaint of having disabled his arm, and other parts of his body, and other wrongs to the said "Joseph" that she had done, contrary to the peace of our Lord the King. Instead of bringing Mary to Court, an Englishman would have courted her, but "Maltese Joe" cannot hear that "Little Micky Connor" should be his rival. Old people are foolish as well as young ones, in their way. Mary ordered to find securities to keep the peace - Micky Connor, at her elbow, performed the kind office of surety, and sure he could do no more for her; but Tim Connor with a friendly air came forward, and paid the fees. There is true friendship in these little matters among poor people, and Mary knows how to express her gratitude.

Sent to factory
Citation details: The Monitor (Sydney) Wed 23 Apr 1828 p. 8
Text:

Mary Goodwin, a hoary-headed sinner, was in a state of inebriation when put to the bar, and during her trial could not refrain from giving the Bench and the auditors a specimen of the low state into which a daughter of Eve may fall, when rendered the victim of decrepid old age, rags, and extreme vice - Guilty - To be kept nine months hard labour in the Factory.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Mon 21 Apr 1828 p. 2
Text:

Mary Goodwin was indicted for assaulting Richard Keefe. This notorious old vagabond has made her appearance before the Police Court ___ and often, and been frequently forgiven, fined and confined. The complainant had detected her in the open road in criminal connection, and disturbed her, but left her to herself for the night, there not being any watch house within four miles, but as soon as she had found herself sufficiently at leisure, she followed complainant to a neighbour's house, and there assaulted him with sticks and stones, so that his life was greatly despaired of ; and true it is he was near unto death, for it was in the house of Ambrose Death the charge of brickbats took place. This vagabond woman appeared in court in a beastly state of drunkenness, her grey hairs exposed by the cap falling off her head; she used horrid expressions as she stood in the dock, and displayed the most shocking depravity of heart and mind. Gulity. Sentence: to be confined in the Factory and there ne kept to hard labour in Class no 3, for the term of nine calendar months.

Census
Text:

Goodwin, Mary, 50, free by servitude, Friends, 7 years, Catholic, factory, Parramatta

Placed in stocks
Citation details: Sydney Herald Mon 11 Jun 1832 p. 4
Text:

POLICE INCIDENTS.
THURSDAY. - Mary Goodwin, who bore a strong resemblance to a dried haddock, was placed at the bar charged with "maxing" it.
Bench. - Have you five shillings? Mary - No, blunt's very scarce!
Bench. - Then how your pretty face in the stocks for three hours.

Death
Text:

Name: Mary Goodwin
Death Date: 1835
Death Place: New South Wales
Registration Year: 1835
Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales
Volume Number: V18352051 19

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 3 Jan 1835 p. 2
Text:

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Thursday last an inquest was held at the St. patrick, Cambridge-street, on the body of Mary Goodwin, aged 55 years, who fell down on the previous evening, in Harrington-street, in a state of intoxication. She was immediately conveyed to her home in Cumberland-street, where she died in a few minutes after. Her daughter corroborated the evidence of her neighbours, as to the fact of her excessive indulgence in the use of ardent spirits, and also stated that she had been sometimes afflicted with asthma, which complaint the surgeon, Mr. Nicholson, firmly believed had been occasioned by an intemperate use of strong liquors. Verdict - "Died by the visitation of God".