Thomas Surfleet Kendall, 18071883 (aged 76 years)

Name
Thomas Surfleet /Kendall/
Given names
Thomas Surfleet
Surname
Kendall
Birth June 14, 1807 28 26
Immigration October 9, 1813 (aged 6 years)
Text:

In 1808 Rev. Samuel Marsden persuaded the Church Missionary Society to begin work in New Zealand by appointing a group of men able to teach the Maori 'the arts of civilization', as well as to act as catechists. In 1809 Kendall, whose preoccupation with religion had from youth been intense, though discontinuous, volunteered for service in the proposed mission and was accepted. With his wife and five children, he sailed for New South Wales in 1813.

Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Sat 16 Oct 1813 Page 1
Text:

"By the Earl Spencer His Majesty's 73d Regiment...
By the above ship also have arrived the following passengers; viz. Mr. and Mrs. Young, Mr. John Dixon, Mr. I.N. Nicholas, Mr. D. Miller, and four servants; Mr. and Mrs. Pear and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kendall and family; Mr. and Mrs. Belvin, and son; and Mr and Mrs. Hovel, and family."

Census November 1828 (aged 21 years)
Text:

Kendall, Thomas, came free, Elizabeth, 1827, protestant, handholder, Illawarra
Kendall, Jane, 45, came free, Elizabeth, 1827
Kendall, Thomas, 22, came free, Rosanna, 1827
Kendall, Basil, 21, came free, L. Blackwood, 1828
Kendall, Joseph, 19, came free, Elizabeth, 1828
Kendall, John, 17, came free, Elizabeth
Kendall, Laurence, 11, came free, Elizabeth 1828
Kendall, Edward, 6, came free, Elizabeth, 1828

Religious marriageCaroline Bates RutterView this family
1830 (aged 22 years)
Text:

Name: Thomas S Kendall
Spouse Name: Caroline Rutter
Marriage Date: 1830
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1830
Volume Number: V A

Death November 2, 1883 (aged 76 years)
Citation details: Kiama Independent Dri 9 Nov 1883 p. 2
Text:

OBITUARY.
The departure from our midst of the late Thomas Surfleet Kendall J.P., whose death and burial were briefly noticed in our last issue, will be severely felt by Kiama Society, but especially so by the members of his own family, and his intimate acquaintances. Seeing that the family is one of the oldest and closely connected with the early history of New Zealand, of this colony, and also of this district, it will not, in a notice of this kind, be out of place to advert to some incidents connected with the family's advent to, and experience in, those colonies. The late Mr. Kendall was born in Bryanstone-street, Marylebone, London, on June 14th, 1807, and consequently at the time of his death was in his 77th year. He was the eldest son of the Rev. Thomas and Jane Kendall, who with Thomas, the subject of this notice, and other children, sailed to this colony in the year 1813, under the auspices of the Church of England Missionary Society, in the ship Earl Spencer, making the passage in six months (which in those days was considered a very good one.) They landed in Sydney early in the following year, and shortly afterwards sailed to New Zealand in the mission brig Active, Captain Hanson, accompanied by the following reverend gentlemen and their families : S. Marsden, W. Hall, J. King, and W. Hanson. The Kendall family resided in New Zealand eleven years, principally in the Bay of Islands, at the expiration of which time they returned to England by the whaler Mary, Captain Renwick, arriving there via Cape Horn after a six months passage. During a two years' residence in the old country, or rather towards the latter end of that
time, the health of Mr. T. S. Kendall began to fail, and, accidentally falling in with Captain Herd—an old friend of his father's—who was about to sail to New Zealand with a number of other gentlemen with the object of forming a settlement in that colony, he —the late of T. S. Kendall—accepted an offer to accompany the party in the capacity of interpreter, he having previously become proficient in the Maori language, and again sailed for New Zealand accordingly, Mr. Kendall served the company as interpreter for about two years, and during that period was the means of saving two vessels and their crews from destruction by the natives; and an incident occurred during the same period which, had it
not been for Mr. Kendall's sagacity and prompt action, would have resulted in
the whole of the party being killed. Mr. Kendall—the subject of this notice
—left New Zealand for Sydney, arriving there in 1827, and after a residence
of some six months with Mr. John Cowell, of Parramatta, he was surprised
while at breakfast one morning by the unexpected arrival of his father from
Valparaiso, South America. In November of the same year, Mr. Kendall, senior, purchased a quantity of land in Kiama—now known as the Barroul Estate—from Mr. Wright, and Thomas Surfleet, the eldest son, was sent down to manage it, the family following shortly afterwards. It will thus be seen that the late T. S. Kendall, whose remains were interred in the private cemetery on the same estate on Sunday last, was nearly 21 years old on coming to the district, and had been a resident of the same for nearly fifty-six years. Three years after coming to the district—that is to say on 11th January, 1830—he was married by the Rev. Dr.
Lang, then the Presbyterian chaplain, to the present Mrs., or rather widow
Kendall, of Barroul. They reared a family of six daughters and three sons on the strictest moral principles. Of the daughters two are dead, namely, Mrs. R. Marks and Mrs. J. H. Zillman, both being married ladies; one is the relict of the late and much-lamented John Black ; one the wife of T. J. Fuller, Esq., of Fullerton ; the
remaining two are single and reside with their mother and Mrs. Black at Barroul. Of the boys it is only necessary to say that they are all married, well off, and occupy honourable positions in society. Of the deceased it may safely be said that he was an unobtrusive, upright, liberal Christian man, a consistent member of the Wesleyan Church, and never made an enemy. He was for many years on the Commission of the Peace, and his conduct on the Bench was always characterised by strict integrity and unwavering impartiality. The immediate cause of death was paralysis, a serious attack of which threatened to be fatal some months ago ; and though at last the end was so sudden that none of his family had a parting word, yet it may be truly said that he had for some time been living in daily expectation of the final summons.

Family with parents
father
17781832
Birth: December 13, 1778North Thoresby, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: August 1832
mother
17811866
Birth: 1781
Death: 1866
Marriage MarriageNovember 21, 1803Kirmington, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom
1 year
elder sister
18041881
Birth: November 18, 1804 25 23Thoresby, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: October 10, 1881Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
14 months
elder sister
18051870
Birth: about 1805 26 24
Death: 1870
3 years
himself
18071883
Birth: June 14, 1807 28 26London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: November 2, 1883Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
younger brother
18091852
Birth: 1809 30 28
Death: 1852
3 years
younger brother
18111895
Birth: about 1811 32 30
Death: February 8, 1895New South Wales, Australia
1 year
younger brother
18111865
Birth: 1811 32 30
Death: January 19, 1865Paddington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
younger brother
18131813
Birth: 1813 34 32
Death: 1813Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
younger brother
18161827
Birth: 1816 37 35
Death: November 1827New South Wales, Australia
3 years
younger brother
18181881
Birth: about 1818 39 37
Death: June 8, 1881Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
5 years
younger brother
18221902
Birth: 1822 43 41
Death: 1902Milton, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Caroline Bates Rutter
himself
18071883
Birth: June 14, 1807 28 26London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: November 2, 1883Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
wife
18091891
Birth: about 1809 43 34New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1891Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
Religious marriage Religious marriage1830Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18321860
Birth: 1832 24 23New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1860Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
1 year
son
18321905
Birth: 1832 24 23New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 8, 1905Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
18351893
Birth: 1835 27 26New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1893St Peters, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
3 years
son
18401920
Birth: March 30, 1840 32 31Darling Forest, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1920Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18421875
Birth: March 9, 1842 34 33Darling Forest, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1875Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18451895
Birth: 1845 37 36New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 28, 1895Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18481926
Birth: 1848 40 39New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1926New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18501924
Birth: 1850 42 41New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1924Kiama, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
ImmigrationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

In 1808 Rev. Samuel Marsden persuaded the Church Missionary Society to begin work in New Zealand by appointing a group of men able to teach the Maori 'the arts of civilization', as well as to act as catechists. In 1809 Kendall, whose preoccupation with religion had from youth been intense, though discontinuous, volunteered for service in the proposed mission and was accepted. With his wife and five children, he sailed for New South Wales in 1813.

ImmigrationNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Sat 16 Oct 1813 Page 1
Text:

"By the Earl Spencer His Majesty's 73d Regiment...
By the above ship also have arrived the following passengers; viz. Mr. and Mrs. Young, Mr. John Dixon, Mr. I.N. Nicholas, Mr. D. Miller, and four servants; Mr. and Mrs. Pear and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kendall and family; Mr. and Mrs. Belvin, and son; and Mr and Mrs. Hovel, and family."

CensusCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Text:

Kendall, Thomas, came free, Elizabeth, 1827, protestant, handholder, Illawarra
Kendall, Jane, 45, came free, Elizabeth, 1827
Kendall, Thomas, 22, came free, Rosanna, 1827
Kendall, Basil, 21, came free, L. Blackwood, 1828
Kendall, Joseph, 19, came free, Elizabeth, 1828
Kendall, John, 17, came free, Elizabeth
Kendall, Laurence, 11, came free, Elizabeth 1828
Kendall, Edward, 6, came free, Elizabeth, 1828

MarriageAncestry.com. Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text:

Name: Thomas S Kendall
Spouse Name: Caroline Rutter
Marriage Date: 1830
Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales
Registration Year: 1830
Volume Number: V A

DeathWebsite - William Rutter Reunion
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details: Kiama Independent Dri 9 Nov 1883 p. 2
Text:

OBITUARY.
The departure from our midst of the late Thomas Surfleet Kendall J.P., whose death and burial were briefly noticed in our last issue, will be severely felt by Kiama Society, but especially so by the members of his own family, and his intimate acquaintances. Seeing that the family is one of the oldest and closely connected with the early history of New Zealand, of this colony, and also of this district, it will not, in a notice of this kind, be out of place to advert to some incidents connected with the family's advent to, and experience in, those colonies. The late Mr. Kendall was born in Bryanstone-street, Marylebone, London, on June 14th, 1807, and consequently at the time of his death was in his 77th year. He was the eldest son of the Rev. Thomas and Jane Kendall, who with Thomas, the subject of this notice, and other children, sailed to this colony in the year 1813, under the auspices of the Church of England Missionary Society, in the ship Earl Spencer, making the passage in six months (which in those days was considered a very good one.) They landed in Sydney early in the following year, and shortly afterwards sailed to New Zealand in the mission brig Active, Captain Hanson, accompanied by the following reverend gentlemen and their families : S. Marsden, W. Hall, J. King, and W. Hanson. The Kendall family resided in New Zealand eleven years, principally in the Bay of Islands, at the expiration of which time they returned to England by the whaler Mary, Captain Renwick, arriving there via Cape Horn after a six months passage. During a two years' residence in the old country, or rather towards the latter end of that
time, the health of Mr. T. S. Kendall began to fail, and, accidentally falling in with Captain Herd—an old friend of his father's—who was about to sail to New Zealand with a number of other gentlemen with the object of forming a settlement in that colony, he —the late of T. S. Kendall—accepted an offer to accompany the party in the capacity of interpreter, he having previously become proficient in the Maori language, and again sailed for New Zealand accordingly, Mr. Kendall served the company as interpreter for about two years, and during that period was the means of saving two vessels and their crews from destruction by the natives; and an incident occurred during the same period which, had it
not been for Mr. Kendall's sagacity and prompt action, would have resulted in
the whole of the party being killed. Mr. Kendall—the subject of this notice
—left New Zealand for Sydney, arriving there in 1827, and after a residence
of some six months with Mr. John Cowell, of Parramatta, he was surprised
while at breakfast one morning by the unexpected arrival of his father from
Valparaiso, South America. In November of the same year, Mr. Kendall, senior, purchased a quantity of land in Kiama—now known as the Barroul Estate—from Mr. Wright, and Thomas Surfleet, the eldest son, was sent down to manage it, the family following shortly afterwards. It will thus be seen that the late T. S. Kendall, whose remains were interred in the private cemetery on the same estate on Sunday last, was nearly 21 years old on coming to the district, and had been a resident of the same for nearly fifty-six years. Three years after coming to the district—that is to say on 11th January, 1830—he was married by the Rev. Dr.
Lang, then the Presbyterian chaplain, to the present Mrs., or rather widow
Kendall, of Barroul. They reared a family of six daughters and three sons on the strictest moral principles. Of the daughters two are dead, namely, Mrs. R. Marks and Mrs. J. H. Zillman, both being married ladies; one is the relict of the late and much-lamented John Black ; one the wife of T. J. Fuller, Esq., of Fullerton ; the
remaining two are single and reside with their mother and Mrs. Black at Barroul. Of the boys it is only necessary to say that they are all married, well off, and occupy honourable positions in society. Of the deceased it may safely be said that he was an unobtrusive, upright, liberal Christian man, a consistent member of the Wesleyan Church, and never made an enemy. He was for many years on the Commission of the Peace, and his conduct on the Bench was always characterised by strict integrity and unwavering impartiality. The immediate cause of death was paralysis, a serious attack of which threatened to be fatal some months ago ; and though at last the end was so sudden that none of his family had a parting word, yet it may be truly said that he had for some time been living in daily expectation of the final summons.

SourceWebsite - William Rutter Reunion
Note: www.ulladulla.info/history/rutter/