William Watkins, 18181867 (aged 49 years)

Name
William Watkins
Given names
William
Surname
Watkins
Birth 1818

MarriageElizabeth MoffatView this family

Death of a wifeElizabeth Moffat
July 13, 1862 (aged 44 years)

Death March 30, 1867 (aged 49 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tues 23 Apr 1867 p. 1

Text:

On the night of 30th march, drowned, at Port Hacking, in the wreck of the schooner Albion, WILLIAM WATKINS, master mariner, leaving a wife and three children to deplore their loss.

Citation details:

The Queenslander (Brisbane) Sat 6 Apr 1867 p. 4

Text:

TOTAL WRECK OF THE SCHOONER ALBION, OF SYDNEY, AND LOSS OF FIVE LIVES. — S. M. Herald. It is once more our painful duty to report the loss of life by shipwreck. In this instance, the schooner Albion, the property of Mr. J. Shoobert, of Balmain, is the unfortunate vessel. From Samuel Waters, one of the two survivors, we glean the following account of the sad catastrophe : —The Albion, a schooner of 170 tons, William Watkins, master, left Bulli for Sydney, with a cargo of coal, on Thursday morning, at 5 o'clock, the wind at that time being light southerly, and during the forenoon it dropped quite calm. On Friday there was a light N.E. breeze, which continued from that quarter until 2 p.m. on Saturday, when it veered round to the southward, coming in squalls all night, ac companied by rain and dark dirty weather. At half-past 9 o'clock the captain stood off the land to try and make out Sydney light, but failing to do bo, came in close for the purpose of endeavoring to recognise the land. It being too dark to see what the land was, he began to wear the ship, and in doing so she struck on a reef near the south head of Port Hacking, at 10.30 p.m.; she then began to break-up, the stern going first, and the crew, wishing to stick to her as long as they could, assembled on the bowsprit until 11 o'clock, when the bows parted and precipitated them into the water. Thomas Williams, Samuel Waters, and another called Jack, whose surname we were unable to ascertain last night, got on to a piece of the bulwarks, where they remained until 7 o'clock yesterday morning, having been drifted about three miles to sea, when the tide set them in again; Jack, however, about 2 a.m., died from exhaustion. The following are the names of the crew :—William Watkins, master (drowned) ; Charles Nelson (drowned) ; Charles Morgan (drowned) ; Christopher ——, a Swede (drowned) ; John (drowned); Samuel Waters (saved); Thomas Williams (saved). All the crew were single men, with the exception of the captain, whose wife and family reside at Miller's Point.

Family with Elizabeth Moffat
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wife
Marriage
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BirthTuxford, Bob, [various titles] email messages to Marion Purnell, May 2011
MarriageTuxford, Bob, [various titles] email messages to Marion Purnell, May 2011
DeathTuxford, Bob, [various titles] email messages to Marion Purnell, May 2011
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tues 23 Apr 1867 p. 1

Text:

On the night of 30th march, drowned, at Port Hacking, in the wreck of the schooner Albion, WILLIAM WATKINS, master mariner, leaving a wife and three children to deplore their loss.

DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

The Queenslander (Brisbane) Sat 6 Apr 1867 p. 4

Text:

TOTAL WRECK OF THE SCHOONER ALBION, OF SYDNEY, AND LOSS OF FIVE LIVES. — S. M. Herald. It is once more our painful duty to report the loss of life by shipwreck. In this instance, the schooner Albion, the property of Mr. J. Shoobert, of Balmain, is the unfortunate vessel. From Samuel Waters, one of the two survivors, we glean the following account of the sad catastrophe : —The Albion, a schooner of 170 tons, William Watkins, master, left Bulli for Sydney, with a cargo of coal, on Thursday morning, at 5 o'clock, the wind at that time being light southerly, and during the forenoon it dropped quite calm. On Friday there was a light N.E. breeze, which continued from that quarter until 2 p.m. on Saturday, when it veered round to the southward, coming in squalls all night, ac companied by rain and dark dirty weather. At half-past 9 o'clock the captain stood off the land to try and make out Sydney light, but failing to do bo, came in close for the purpose of endeavoring to recognise the land. It being too dark to see what the land was, he began to wear the ship, and in doing so she struck on a reef near the south head of Port Hacking, at 10.30 p.m.; she then began to break-up, the stern going first, and the crew, wishing to stick to her as long as they could, assembled on the bowsprit until 11 o'clock, when the bows parted and precipitated them into the water. Thomas Williams, Samuel Waters, and another called Jack, whose surname we were unable to ascertain last night, got on to a piece of the bulwarks, where they remained until 7 o'clock yesterday morning, having been drifted about three miles to sea, when the tide set them in again; Jack, however, about 2 a.m., died from exhaustion. The following are the names of the crew :—William Watkins, master (drowned) ; Charles Nelson (drowned) ; Charles Morgan (drowned) ; Christopher ——, a Swede (drowned) ; John (drowned); Samuel Waters (saved); Thomas Williams (saved). All the crew were single men, with the exception of the captain, whose wife and family reside at Miller's Point.