Samuel Terry, 17771838 (aged 61 years)

Name
Samuel /Terry/
Given names
Samuel
Surname
Terry
Birth about 1777

Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

age given as 51 in 1828

Immigration June 12, 1801 (aged 24 years)
Text:

Samuel was a labourer at Manchester, England, when on 22 Jan 1800 at the Salford Quarter Sessions, Lancashire, he was convicted of the theft of 400 pairs of stockings and sentenced to transportation for seven years. In June he was transferred to the unsalubrious hulk 'Fortunee' at Langstone Harbour, and thence to the transport 'Earl Cornwallis' in which he arrived at Sydney in June 1801.

Citation details:

Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 279 (139)

Text:

Samuel Terry, one of 296 convicts transported on the ship Earl Cornwallis, August 1800. Sentence details: Convicted at Lancaster Quarter Sessions for a term of 7 years on 22 January 1800. Vessel: Earl Cornwallis. Date of Departure: August 1800. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Citation details:

p. 338

Text:

The ship Earl Cornwallis arrived in NSW 12 Jun 1801

Citation details:

Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 28 January 1800 p. 4

Text:

On Wednesday, the Quarter Sessions for this town began at the New Bayley Court House, and the following prisoners have taken their trials - Samuel Terry for stealing a truss, containing a quantity of stockings; and James Diggle for stealing two pieces of gingham, to be transported for seven years each.

Occupation
Stonemason, shopkeeper, private soldier, farmer
between 1801 and 1809 (aged 32 years)
Text:

Samuel worked under Samuel Marsden's direction in a stonemason's gang on the Parramatta female factory and gaol, and helped to cut stones for the church; he was both flogged for neglect of duty and rewarded for his industry.

By 1804 he was living in a 'commodious house' and the 'Sydney Gazette' for January 15 reported:

'Last Sunday night a depredation was effected at Parramatta in the house of Samuel Terry; from whence a quantity of wearing apparel, some money, and various other property was taken. It had every appearance of a friendly visit, as an inner bolt was cut away, supposed to have been done in the course of the preceeding day with a view of facilitating the evening's progress'.

In 1804-5 he was a private in the Parramatta militia. By 1806 he had completed his esentence and had set up his own stonemasonry business.

In 1809 a neighbour William Wall, sued him for defamation and described him as 'Vile, Rich and oppulent'.

Not marriedMary PritchardView this family
about 1808 (aged 31 years)
Text:

It is supposed that Mary Pritchard formed a brief common law relationship with Samuel Terry some time after her relationship with Ferdinand Meurant and prior to her cohabiting with John Maskey, some time around the years 1804-08. The only evidence I can locate for this supposition is that Mary Pritchard's daughter - Corah Maskey - who was born in 1809, was described "Corah Terry' when she married Edward Beecroft/Bearcroft in 1823. Some researchers go so far as to interpret Corah's identification as "Corah Terry" at her marriage as evidence that she was Terry's rather than Maskey's daughter.

MarriageRosetta PraceyView this family
March 27, 1810 (aged 33 years)

Address: St Philips
Text:

Samuel was an innkeeper at bachelor and Rosetta 'Madden' described herself as a widow.

Occupation
Innkeeper, farmer, trader
between 1810 and 1820 (aged 43 years)
Note: Terry moved to Sydney, became an innkeeper, and in…

Terry moved to Sydney, became an innkeeper, and in February 1810, when liquor licences were curtailed, his was one of the 20 that were granted.

He prospered not only though his inn and store, but soon by speculation in city and pastoral properties. He bought up property including the land now occupied by Martin Place and the old General Post Office, which Rosetta later sold to the government. By the time of his death in 1838 he was receiving more than ten thousand pounds a year from the rentals of his Sydney properties alone.

By 1815, he had established a farm, Mount Pleasant, on the Nepean River and also had Illawarra properties; in 1817 Governor Lachlan Macquarie, who granted him city allotments, described him as a 'wealthy trader'. Terry was also an important supplier of flour and fresh meat to the government. Between 1817 and 1820 he held more than a fifth of the total value of mortgages registered in the colony, a higher proportion than that of the Bank of New South Wales.

Commissioner John Thomas Bigge reported that in 1820 he had 1450 cattle, 3800 sheep, and 19,000 acres (7689 ha), almost exactly half of the land held by former convicts. He was also one of the largest shareholders in the bank, but when he stood for election as director in 1818, 1819 and 1820, he was unsuccessful; when elected in 1822 he was refused his seat on the pretext that, as an expiree, he was not 'unconditionally free'.

DeathNathaniel Lucas
May 1818 (aged 41 years)
Occupation
Horse breeder, builder, farmer, flour miller, brewer, philanthropist
between 1820 and 1826 (aged 49 years)

Note: In the 1820s Samuel consolidated his wealth; he es…

In the 1820s Samuel consolidated his wealth; he established a bloodstock stud on Illawarra land granted him by Macquarie, built the vast Terry's buildings opposite his residence in Pitt Street, established a country seat, Box Hill, and developed his farming properties at Liverpool, on the Nepean, and later at Yass and Bathurst, as well as flour mills and breweries. He was also a leading philanthropist, contributing to the Benevolent Society, Auxiliary Bible Society, Sydney Public Grammar School, and later to Sydney College, on whose committees he actively served. He supported the Wesleyans and became a trustee for them in 1822.

In the late 1820s he was firmly established as a public figure. He is now nicknamed the 'Botany Bay Rothschild'.

OccupationWilliam Bursill
1822 (aged 45 years)
Will 1825 (aged 48 years)
Text:

In 1825 Samuel made an elaborate will. He gave Rosetta his Box Hill property along with 'the household furniture, plate, linen and china that I shall have in use in the house in which I shall usually reside at the time of my decease'.

Samuel had set up his son Edward with considerable property of his own and originally most of Samuel's money was to go to Edward also. Edward's marriage in 1834 to a well connected Sydney girl, Elizabeth Mann was a failure. A blame game developed whereby his ex wife and her supporters described him as drunken, dissipated and brutal. The result was that in several codicils Samuel tied up Edward's property in trust and divided the other properties, money and assets among all the children. Edward died childless and intestate a few months after his father in an influenza epidemic.

Ironically, therefore, the Terry name was perpetuated by the boy, John who may not have been Terry's son.

Census November 1828 (aged 51 years)
Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

Terry, Samuel, 51, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, Protestant, merchant, 4 Pitt Street Sydney Terry, Rosetta, 51, came free, Hillsborough, 1799, Protestant Terry, John, 22, born in the colony Terry, Edward, 19, born in the colony Terry, Martha, 17, born in the colony

Death February 22, 1838 (aged 61 years)

Cause of death: Three years after a paralytic seizure
Note: Samuel had what was thought to be the grandest funeral seen in the colony. He left a personal estate of £250,000, an income of over £10,000 a year from Sydney rentals, and landed property that defies assessment. His family sold to the government the land now occupied by Martin Place and the General Post Office.
Family with Mary Pritchard
himself
17771838
Birth: about 1777
Death: February 22, 1838
partner
17861865
Birth: about 1786
Death: December 11, 1865Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Not married
Not married: about 1808Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Rosetta Pracey
himself
17771838
Birth: about 1777
Death: February 22, 1838
wife
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: March 27, 1810
-3 years
son
18061842
Birth: about 1806 29 35
Death: 1842New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
18101838
Birth: April 26, 1810 33 39Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 28, 1838Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
18 months
daughter
18111877
Birth: October 31, 1811 34 41Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 30, 1877Penrith, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Ferdinand Charles Meurant + Mary Pritchard
partner’s partner
Meurant, Ferdinand (1765-1844)
17651844
Birth: November 8, 1765France
Death: November 4, 1844Seven Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
partner
17861865
Birth: about 1786
Death: December 11, 1865Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Not married
Not married: about 1803New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-son
18041851
Birth: December 17, 1804 39 18Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 1, 1851Auckland, Auckland, North Island, New Zealand
0 months
step-daughter
18041810
Birth: 1804 38 18Prospect, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 10, 1810Prospect, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
John Maskey + Mary Pritchard
partner’s partner
17851849
Birth: about 1785
Death: July 3, 1849Freemans Reach, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
partner
17861865
Birth: about 1786
Death: December 11, 1865Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: August 28, 1826Castlereagh, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-18 years
step-daughter
18091881
Birth: March 16, 1809 24 23Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 1, 1881Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
step-daughter
18111890
Birth: August 24, 1811 26 25Wilberforce, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 12, 1890Maitland, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-son
18141882
Birth: January 9, 1814 29 28Wilberforce, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 3, 1882Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18161887
Birth: June 11, 1816 31 30Wilberforce, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 26, 1887
4 years
step-daughter
18201881
Birth: June 15, 1820 35 34Wilberforce, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 29, 1881Newton Boyd, Northern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18221823
Birth: September 9, 1822 37 36South Creek, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 9, 1823Castlereagh, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-daughter
18251881
Birth: January 29, 1825 40 39South Creek, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: April 13, 1881West Maitland, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
step-son
18271887
Birth: February 21, 1827 42 41South Creek, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 10, 1887Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
step-son
18291893
Birth: October 9, 1829 44 43Orchard Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 1, 1893Razorback, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Edward Madden + Rosetta Pracey
partner’s partner
1799
Birth: United Kingdom
Death: 1799The high Seas
wife
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
Henry Marsh + Rosetta Pracey
partner’s partner
wife
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
1 month
step-son
17981825
Birth: before October 1798 28
Death: 1825Rangoon, Burma
19 months
step-daughter
18001873
Birth: April 28, 1800 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1873
BirthCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

age given as 51 in 1828

ImmigrationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

Samuel was a labourer at Manchester, England, when on 22 Jan 1800 at the Salford Quarter Sessions, Lancashire, he was convicted of the theft of 400 pairs of stockings and sentenced to transportation for seven years. In June he was transferred to the unsalubrious hulk 'Fortunee' at Langstone Harbour, and thence to the transport 'Earl Cornwallis' in which he arrived at Sydney in June 1801.

ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Citation details:

Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 279 (139)

Text:

Samuel Terry, one of 296 convicts transported on the ship Earl Cornwallis, August 1800. Sentence details: Convicted at Lancaster Quarter Sessions for a term of 7 years on 22 January 1800. Vessel: Earl Cornwallis. Date of Departure: August 1800. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Citation details:

p. 338

Text:

The ship Earl Cornwallis arrived in NSW 12 Jun 1801

ImmigrationBritish Newspaper Archive [database online]
Citation details:

Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 28 January 1800 p. 4

Text:

On Wednesday, the Quarter Sessions for this town began at the New Bayley Court House, and the following prisoners have taken their trials - Samuel Terry for stealing a truss, containing a quantity of stockings; and James Diggle for stealing two pieces of gingham, to be transported for seven years each.

OccupationPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

Samuel worked under Samuel Marsden's direction in a stonemason's gang on the Parramatta female factory and gaol, and helped to cut stones for the church; he was both flogged for neglect of duty and rewarded for his industry.

By 1804 he was living in a 'commodious house' and the 'Sydney Gazette' for January 15 reported:

'Last Sunday night a depredation was effected at Parramatta in the house of Samuel Terry; from whence a quantity of wearing apparel, some money, and various other property was taken. It had every appearance of a friendly visit, as an inner bolt was cut away, supposed to have been done in the course of the preceeding day with a view of facilitating the evening's progress'.

In 1804-5 he was a private in the Parramatta militia. By 1806 he had completed his esentence and had set up his own stonemasonry business.

In 1809 a neighbour William Wall, sued him for defamation and described him as 'Vile, Rich and oppulent'.

Not marriedPurnell, Marion (editor)
Text:

It is supposed that Mary Pritchard formed a brief common law relationship with Samuel Terry some time after her relationship with Ferdinand Meurant and prior to her cohabiting with John Maskey, some time around the years 1804-08. The only evidence I can locate for this supposition is that Mary Pritchard's daughter - Corah Maskey - who was born in 1809, was described "Corah Terry' when she married Edward Beecroft/Bearcroft in 1823. Some researchers go so far as to interpret Corah's identification as "Corah Terry" at her marriage as evidence that she was Terry's rather than Maskey's daughter.

MarriageAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

Samuel was an innkeeper at bachelor and Rosetta 'Madden' described herself as a widow.

MarriageHardy, Bobbie. Early Hawkesbury settlers. Kenthurst: Kangaroo Press, 1985
OccupationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
OccupationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
WillPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

In 1825 Samuel made an elaborate will. He gave Rosetta his Box Hill property along with 'the household furniture, plate, linen and china that I shall have in use in the house in which I shall usually reside at the time of my decease'.

Samuel had set up his son Edward with considerable property of his own and originally most of Samuel's money was to go to Edward also. Edward's marriage in 1834 to a well connected Sydney girl, Elizabeth Mann was a failure. A blame game developed whereby his ex wife and her supporters described him as drunken, dissipated and brutal. The result was that in several codicils Samuel tied up Edward's property in trust and divided the other properties, money and assets among all the children. Edward died childless and intestate a few months after his father in an influenza epidemic.

Ironically, therefore, the Terry name was perpetuated by the boy, John who may not have been Terry's son.

CensusCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

Terry, Samuel, 51, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, Protestant, merchant, 4 Pitt Street Sydney Terry, Rosetta, 51, came free, Hillsborough, 1799, Protestant Terry, John, 22, born in the colony Terry, Edward, 19, born in the colony Terry, Martha, 17, born in the colony

DeathAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Occupation

Terry moved to Sydney, became an innkeeper, and in February 1810, when liquor licences were curtailed, his was one of the 20 that were granted.

He prospered not only though his inn and store, but soon by speculation in city and pastoral properties. He bought up property including the land now occupied by Martin Place and the old General Post Office, which Rosetta later sold to the government. By the time of his death in 1838 he was receiving more than ten thousand pounds a year from the rentals of his Sydney properties alone.

By 1815, he had established a farm, Mount Pleasant, on the Nepean River and also had Illawarra properties; in 1817 Governor Lachlan Macquarie, who granted him city allotments, described him as a 'wealthy trader'. Terry was also an important supplier of flour and fresh meat to the government. Between 1817 and 1820 he held more than a fifth of the total value of mortgages registered in the colony, a higher proportion than that of the Bank of New South Wales.

Commissioner John Thomas Bigge reported that in 1820 he had 1450 cattle, 3800 sheep, and 19,000 acres (7689 ha), almost exactly half of the land held by former convicts. He was also one of the largest shareholders in the bank, but when he stood for election as director in 1818, 1819 and 1820, he was unsuccessful; when elected in 1822 he was refused his seat on the pretext that, as an expiree, he was not 'unconditionally free'.

Occupation

In the 1820s Samuel consolidated his wealth; he established a bloodstock stud on Illawarra land granted him by Macquarie, built the vast Terry's buildings opposite his residence in Pitt Street, established a country seat, Box Hill, and developed his farming properties at Liverpool, on the Nepean, and later at Yass and Bathurst, as well as flour mills and breweries. He was also a leading philanthropist, contributing to the Benevolent Society, Auxiliary Bible Society, Sydney Public Grammar School, and later to Sydney College, on whose committees he actively served. He supported the Wesleyans and became a trustee for them in 1822.

In the late 1820s he was firmly established as a public figure. He is now nicknamed the 'Botany Bay Rothschild'.

Death

Samuel had what was thought to be the grandest funeral seen in the colony. He left a personal estate of £250,000, an income of over £10,000 a year from Sydney rentals, and landed property that defies assessment. His family sold to the government the land now occupied by Martin Place and the General Post Office.