Elizabeth Pendergrass Bridget, 17951855 (aged 60 years)

Name
Elizabeth Pendergrass Bridget
Given names
Elizabeth
Surname
Pendergrass
Nickname
Bridget
Married name
Elizabeth Fuller
Birth May 17, 1795
Immigration October 10, 1811 (aged 16 years)
Note:

Bridget was a convict. She was transported to Sydney aboard the ship 'Friends' which arrived 10 Oct 1811. A maidservant, she was convicted of stealing clothing on 19 Sep 1810, aged 15, and only just avoided being hanged. She received a 7 year sentence.

The Old Bailey transcript: BRIDGET PENDERGAST, alias BETTY SMITH, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August, two gowns, value 20 s. a cloak, value 20 s. a shawl, value 15 s. a cap, value 1 d. a bonnet, value 15 s. a laced cloak, value 30 s. a spencer, value 1 s. and five yards of muslin, value 50 s. the property of Charles Cutts, in his dwelling-house.

NANCY CUTTS. I am the wife of the prosecutor, he is a housekeeper, he keeps the Cooper's Arms public house. The prisoner left my service on the 8th of August, between eight and nine in the evening; I missed the things that same nigh; I saw her the next evening at the Flying-horse, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel; she had my gown and spencer on her back; she took the property out of the one pair of stairs room.

Q. When was the last time you had seen them before they were stolen - A. On the 7th of August.

ELIZABETH ALLINGHAM. I keep a milliner's and cloaths-shop in Seething-lane, Tower-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I can positively swear to her; I bought of her a piece of muslin and a black lace cloak, I gave her two pound for them altogether.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am an officer. On Thursday the 9th of August, I took one gown and spencer of the prisoner's back; I found a gown and a bonnet in a box where the prisoner told me, in Thames-street, and a shawl, a bit of muslin, and an old nightcap that was in the trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady gave me thirty shillings for them, and the box belongs to me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Religious marriageEdward FullerView this family
April 20, 1813 (aged 17 years)
Text:

Married by Rev. Marsden 5 months before the birth of their first child. She received an early pardon to marry Edward. The marriage was witnessed by John Maclockan and Mary Jones. Mary Jones had arrived with Elizabeth on the ship 'Friends'. Known as Bridget in England, alias 'Betty Smith' she was always known as Elizabeth while in the colony, including on her marriage record.

Birth of a son
#1
Edward Fuller
September 27, 1813 (aged 18 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Sarah Ann Emma Fuller
April 11, 1815 (aged 19 years)
Christening of a daughterSarah Ann Emma Fuller
October 1, 1815 (aged 20 years)
Address: St. John's Church
Birth of a son
#3
Robert Fuller
1817 (aged 21 years)
Text:

Born 22 May 1817

Text:

Born 22 Apr 1817

Birth of a daughter
#4
Lydia Ann Fuller
May 19, 1820 (aged 25 years)
Residence between 1814 and 1822 (aged 26 years)
Note: In 1814 Elizabeth was recorded as the wife of Edward Fuller. She and one child were off stores at Parramatta. As Pendergrass, she is recorded in 1822 as Free by Servitude, wife of Edward Fuller with a family of 4 children living at Parramatta.
Property
Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
1824 (aged 28 years)

Note:

Domestic problems appear to have beset the family during the 1820s and during an 8 year period the couple had no children.

In 1824 her husband applied for a second land grant after disposing of his first. In his application, he stated that his wife 'has been badly burnt by her clothes taking fire That she had been lying dangerously ill for these two months past'. In his support, Rev Marsden stated that Edward's wife 'had distressed him very much by her misconduct. I am of the opinion he would be able to provide for the family if he had a small farm and was to go out and reside upon it, where his wife would be removed from her present temptation'.

What the temptation was has not been established. Following what appeared to have been a 'girl's night out' Elizabeth together with Elizabeth Stanton and Ellen Duncan appeared before the Bench magistrate in Parramatta on 3 Jul 1824 having been drunken in the town. They were admonished and discharged.

Event
Conviction
March 17, 1825 (aged 29 years)

Note: The Sydney Gazette of 17 Mar 1825 reported that Elizabeth Fuller had been charged with stealing crockery from Mr J. Chandler and reported on the 24th that she had been discharged from custody. In the Gazette of 29 Mar 1826, Edward cautioned the public against giving credit to his wife Elizabeth. It reported on 16 September 1826 that Elizabeth Fuller had charged James McKay with stealing her watch.
Birth of a daughter
#5
Elizabeth Fuller
September 21, 1829 (aged 34 years)
Citation details:

Vol 02, Baptisms, 1826-1834; Marriages, 1826-1834; Burials, 1826-1834

Text:

Born 21 Sep 1829 and baptised 1 Nov 1829 Elizabeth daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Fuller of Dure Hill a farmer Samuel Marsden officiating minister

Marriage of a childCharles William CurtisSarah Ann Emma FullerView this family
July 19, 1830 (aged 35 years)
Address: St. John's Church of England
Note: The marriage was witnessed by Charles' half brother, John Walker of Parramatta, and by James Bridges. The marriage was performed by Rev. Samuel Marsden, with the consent of friends. Charles and Sarah both signed with their X marks.
Birth of a son
#6
John Fuller
April 18, 1831 (aged 35 years)
Citation details:

Vol 02, Baptisms, 1826-1834; Marriages, 1826-1834; Burials, 1826-1834

Text:

Born 18 Apr 1831 and baptised 22 May 1831 John son of Edward and Elizabeth Fuller a farmer of Dure Hill Samuel Marsden officiating minister

Birth of a daughter
#7
Mary Fuller
December 25, 1832 (aged 37 years)
Text:

Born 25 Dec 1832 and baptised 24 Feb 1833 Mary daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Fuller a farmer of Durel [sic] R. Forrest officiating minister

Birth of a son
#8
Timothy Thomas Fuller
April 19, 1835 (aged 39 years)
Text:

Born 19 Apr 1835 and baptised 7 Jun 1835 Timothy Thomas son of Edward and Elizabeth Fuller a farmer of Dural R. Forrest officiating minister

Marriage of a childEdward FullerElizabeth Sarah MooreView this family
1836 (aged 40 years)
Text:

Married at St Johns

Marriage of a childThomas RoperLydia Ann FullerView this family
1838 (aged 42 years)
Address: St. John's Church
Note: V18381779 22/1838 ROPER THOMAS FULLER LYDIA A CB
Death of a daughterElizabeth Fuller
May 2, 1841 (aged 45 years)

Burial of a daughterElizabeth Fuller
May 5, 1841 (aged 45 years)
Cemetery: St. John's Cemetery
Note:

Sacred To the Memory of ELIZABETH FULLER who departed this life May 2 1841. Aged 11 years An 8 monfs All Flesh is grafs and all the Goodness thereof is as the Flowers Of the Field; the Grafs Withereth The Flower Fadeth: but the words of Our God shall stand for Ever

Marriage of a childRobert FullerMary Ann RoganView this family
Type: Religious marriage
January 25, 1842 (aged 46 years)
Address: St Judes
Citation details:

Castle Hill with Doorals Composite 28 February 1841 - 18 February 1951

Text:

Robert Fuller of this parish a bachelor and Mary Anne Rogan of this parish a spinster were married in this church by banns with consent of parents this 25th day of Jan 1842 Robert and Mary Ann both signed the register in the presence of Susannah Howlett of Baulkham Hills, Edward Fuller of Castle Hill and G. Denshire of Castle Hill

Marriage of a childCharles GibbsLydia Ann FullerView this family
Type: Religious marriage
March 5, 1845 (aged 49 years)
Address: St. John's Church
Text:

V1845207 30B/1845 GIBBS CHARLES ROPER LYDIA CB

Text:

Charles Gibbs of the parish of Pennant Hills a bachelor and Lydia Roper of the parish of Pennant Hills a widow were married in this church by banns this 5th day of March 1845 by me H.H. Bobart Both Charles and Lydia made their X marks in the presence John--- and Mary Ann Davies of Parramatta

Death of a sonEdward Fuller
February 14, 1853 (aged 57 years) Age: 38
Burial of a sonEdward Fuller
February 16, 1853 (aged 57 years)
Cemetery: St. John's Cemetery
Note:

Sacred to the Memory of EDWARD FULLER who departed this life February 14th 1853 aged 38 years Also of ELIZABETH SARAH BLACK (Relict of above) who died September 19th 1908 in her 87th year At Rest

Death of a husbandEdward Fuller
February 6, 1855 (aged 59 years)
Burial of a husbandEdward Fuller
February 8, 1855 (aged 59 years)
Cemetery: St. John's Cemetery
Note: Edward was buried at St. John's Cemetery, probably with his son Edward. His wife was buried seven months later in the same vault.
Death October 1855 (aged 60 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tue 30 Oct 1885 p. 2

Text:

PARRAMATTA. INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Friday last, at the house of Mr. William Caldwell of Dural, before Mr. C.B. Lyons, coroner, on view of the body of Elizabeth Fuller, then and three lying dead. John Holland deposed: I am the servant of Mr. Robert Fuller, who resides a mile from this farm; I was coming to my work yesterday morning about 7 o'clock; I was working on this farm' the deceased Elizabeth Fuller, came out of this house; she had a knife or a razor in her hand; she said, "Holland, Holland, what shall I do?"; there was blood on her throat and hands at the time; she went into the house; I went for her daughter Mary, wife of William Caldwell, who resides close by; she came home with me; we went into the room where deceased now lies; she was prostrate on the floor, on her hands and knees, with her face downward; she looked up at me, but did not speak; I then went for Mr. Caldwell; I had seen the deceased about two days before - the day before yesterday; she came to the well to me; she said she was very bad for the want of some spirits, and asked me if I knew where she could get some; she looked very queer, more so than I had ever seen her before' she seemed very wild. Mary Caldwell being sworn: I am the daughter of the deceased, Elizabeth Fuller' I reside with my husband, close by, I saw my mother every day, I saw her yesterday morning; I brought her some tea, the door was shut, I asked her to open it; she did so, took the tea and said she was much better, she would not let me into her room; she was very bad wanting liquor yesterday morning; she had been talking too much lately, she invariably did so; she now and then took starts, and then was apparently out of her mind, she talked of drowning herself; mother had everything she wanted except liquor, as far as we could prevent it; she had no quarrel or disagreement with any one that I know of; I found her yesterday, as described by Holland (the last witness); I found a razor with blood on it lying next to her face; as I tried to raise her up to stop the blood, she struggled and died; she was sixty years of age. It appears that the deceased had been to five different places on Wednesday trying to get liquor, and from her language and gestures, appeared to be insane from drink; she had no property except that which ceased with her death, she appeared to be very kindly treated by her children, who tried every means to stop her drinking, but without avail. Thomas Parsons being sworn, deposed: I am a legally qualified medical practitioner; I have made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found on the neck a wound, extending for about an inch from the left side of the windpipe towards the right ear, of about four inches in length, the skin and cellular tissue and external blood vessels was divided, but the deeper vessel, the carotid artery, was not divided, there are no other marks percievable on the body to account for death, and I am opinion that the deceased died from loss of blood, caused by the wound I have described. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased cut her throat whilst labouring under insanity caused by delirium tremens.

Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tue 30 Oct 1855 p. 2

Burial
Cemetery: St. John's Cemetery
Note: Elizabeth was buried at St. John's Cemetery, probably with her son Edward and husband Edward Sr. (Only Edward Jr. is recorded in the book 'The Parramatta Cemetries: St. John's).
Family with Edward Fuller
husband
17851855
Birth: 1785 29 23Battle, Sussex, England, United Kingdom
Death: February 6, 1855Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
herself
17951855
Birth: May 17, 1795Workington, Cumberland, England, United Kingdom
Death: October 1855Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: April 20, 1813Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
5 months
son
18131853
Birth: September 27, 1813 28 18Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 14, 1853Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
19 months
daughter
18151880
Birth: April 11, 1815 30 19Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 1880Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18171888
Birth: 1817 32 21Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: January 1888
3 years
daughter
18201881
Birth: May 19, 1820 35 25Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 16, 1881Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
10 years
daughter
18291841
Birth: September 21, 1829 44 34Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 2, 1841
19 months
son
18311878
Birth: April 18, 1831 46 35Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1878Burrowa, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
21 months
daughter
18321902
Birth: December 25, 1832 47 37Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1902St Leonards, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
1835
Birth: April 19, 1835 50 39Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
BirthParramatta Family History Group (comp)., Parramatta pioneer register volume 2: settlement to 1920. Parramatta: the Society, 2003
ImmigrationHunt, Philip, Hunt Beeston Family Tree [database online]
MarriageAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, St. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Text:

Married by Rev. Marsden 5 months before the birth of their first child. She received an early pardon to marry Edward. The marriage was witnessed by John Maclockan and Mary Jones. Mary Jones had arrived with Elizabeth on the ship 'Friends'. Known as Bridget in England, alias 'Betty Smith' she was always known as Elizabeth while in the colony, including on her marriage record.

ResidenceSpurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992
PropertySpurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992
EventSpurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tue 30 Oct 1885 p. 2

Text:

PARRAMATTA. INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Friday last, at the house of Mr. William Caldwell of Dural, before Mr. C.B. Lyons, coroner, on view of the body of Elizabeth Fuller, then and three lying dead. John Holland deposed: I am the servant of Mr. Robert Fuller, who resides a mile from this farm; I was coming to my work yesterday morning about 7 o'clock; I was working on this farm' the deceased Elizabeth Fuller, came out of this house; she had a knife or a razor in her hand; she said, "Holland, Holland, what shall I do?"; there was blood on her throat and hands at the time; she went into the house; I went for her daughter Mary, wife of William Caldwell, who resides close by; she came home with me; we went into the room where deceased now lies; she was prostrate on the floor, on her hands and knees, with her face downward; she looked up at me, but did not speak; I then went for Mr. Caldwell; I had seen the deceased about two days before - the day before yesterday; she came to the well to me; she said she was very bad for the want of some spirits, and asked me if I knew where she could get some; she looked very queer, more so than I had ever seen her before' she seemed very wild. Mary Caldwell being sworn: I am the daughter of the deceased, Elizabeth Fuller' I reside with my husband, close by, I saw my mother every day, I saw her yesterday morning; I brought her some tea, the door was shut, I asked her to open it; she did so, took the tea and said she was much better, she would not let me into her room; she was very bad wanting liquor yesterday morning; she had been talking too much lately, she invariably did so; she now and then took starts, and then was apparently out of her mind, she talked of drowning herself; mother had everything she wanted except liquor, as far as we could prevent it; she had no quarrel or disagreement with any one that I know of; I found her yesterday, as described by Holland (the last witness); I found a razor with blood on it lying next to her face; as I tried to raise her up to stop the blood, she struggled and died; she was sixty years of age. It appears that the deceased had been to five different places on Wednesday trying to get liquor, and from her language and gestures, appeared to be insane from drink; she had no property except that which ceased with her death, she appeared to be very kindly treated by her children, who tried every means to stop her drinking, but without avail. Thomas Parsons being sworn, deposed: I am a legally qualified medical practitioner; I have made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found on the neck a wound, extending for about an inch from the left side of the windpipe towards the right ear, of about four inches in length, the skin and cellular tissue and external blood vessels was divided, but the deeper vessel, the carotid artery, was not divided, there are no other marks percievable on the body to account for death, and I am opinion that the deceased died from loss of blood, caused by the wound I have described. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased cut her throat whilst labouring under insanity caused by delirium tremens.

DeathSpurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992
DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Tue 30 Oct 1855 p. 2

BurialHunt, Philip, Hunt Beeston Family Tree [database online]
SourceHunt, Philip, Hunt Beeston Family Tree [database online]
Note: http://www.philiphunt.com/family/tree.htm
Immigration

Bridget was a convict. She was transported to Sydney aboard the ship 'Friends' which arrived 10 Oct 1811. A maidservant, she was convicted of stealing clothing on 19 Sep 1810, aged 15, and only just avoided being hanged. She received a 7 year sentence.

The Old Bailey transcript: BRIDGET PENDERGAST, alias BETTY SMITH, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August, two gowns, value 20 s. a cloak, value 20 s. a shawl, value 15 s. a cap, value 1 d. a bonnet, value 15 s. a laced cloak, value 30 s. a spencer, value 1 s. and five yards of muslin, value 50 s. the property of Charles Cutts, in his dwelling-house.

NANCY CUTTS. I am the wife of the prosecutor, he is a housekeeper, he keeps the Cooper's Arms public house. The prisoner left my service on the 8th of August, between eight and nine in the evening; I missed the things that same nigh; I saw her the next evening at the Flying-horse, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel; she had my gown and spencer on her back; she took the property out of the one pair of stairs room.

Q. When was the last time you had seen them before they were stolen - A. On the 7th of August.

ELIZABETH ALLINGHAM. I keep a milliner's and cloaths-shop in Seething-lane, Tower-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I can positively swear to her; I bought of her a piece of muslin and a black lace cloak, I gave her two pound for them altogether.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am an officer. On Thursday the 9th of August, I took one gown and spencer of the prisoner's back; I found a gown and a bonnet in a box where the prisoner told me, in Thames-street, and a shawl, a bit of muslin, and an old nightcap that was in the trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady gave me thirty shillings for them, and the box belongs to me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Residence

In 1814 Elizabeth was recorded as the wife of Edward Fuller. She and one child were off stores at Parramatta. As Pendergrass, she is recorded in 1822 as Free by Servitude, wife of Edward Fuller with a family of 4 children living at Parramatta.

Property

Domestic problems appear to have beset the family during the 1820s and during an 8 year period the couple had no children.

In 1824 her husband applied for a second land grant after disposing of his first. In his application, he stated that his wife 'has been badly burnt by her clothes taking fire That she had been lying dangerously ill for these two months past'. In his support, Rev Marsden stated that Edward's wife 'had distressed him very much by her misconduct. I am of the opinion he would be able to provide for the family if he had a small farm and was to go out and reside upon it, where his wife would be removed from her present temptation'.

What the temptation was has not been established. Following what appeared to have been a 'girl's night out' Elizabeth together with Elizabeth Stanton and Ellen Duncan appeared before the Bench magistrate in Parramatta on 3 Jul 1824 having been drunken in the town. They were admonished and discharged.

Event

The Sydney Gazette of 17 Mar 1825 reported that Elizabeth Fuller had been charged with stealing crockery from Mr J. Chandler and reported on the 24th that she had been discharged from custody. In the Gazette of 29 Mar 1826, Edward cautioned the public against giving credit to his wife Elizabeth. It reported on 16 September 1826 that Elizabeth Fuller had charged James McKay with stealing her watch.

Burial

Elizabeth was buried at St. John's Cemetery, probably with her son Edward and husband Edward Sr. (Only Edward Jr. is recorded in the book 'The Parramatta Cemetries: St. John's).