William George Fishburn, 19191943 (aged 24 years)

Name
William George Fishburn
Given names
William George
Surname
Fishburn
Birth March 20, 1919 46 37
Military
World War II

Note: William served in World War II.
Birth of a brotherJohn Henry Fishburn
May 5, 1922 (aged 3 years)
Death of a paternal grandfatherGeorge Gordon Fishburn
July 4, 1923 (aged 4 years)
Address: Rookwood Hospital and Asylum
Burial of a paternal grandfatherGeorge Gordon Fishburn
July 5, 1923 (aged 4 years)

Address: Church of England Section
Cemetery: Rookwood Cemetery
Death of a fatherWilliam Henry Fishburn
1923 (aged 3 years)
Death of a paternal grandmotherEllen McMahon
November 18, 1925 (aged 6 years)
Address: 35 Manning Road Double Bay New South Wales Australia
Burial of a paternal grandmotherEllen McMahon
November 20, 1925 (aged 6 years)

Address: Roman Catholic section
Cemetery: Waverley Cemetery
Death of a motherLillian May Sanders
1928 (aged 8 years)
Death May 13, 1943 (aged 24 years)
Note: William died as a prisoner of war working on the Burma-Siam Railway.
Burial June 1943
Cemetery: Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery
Note:

The village of Thanbyuzayat is 65 kilometres south of the port of Moulmein, and the war cemetery lies at the foot of the hills which separate the Union of Myanmar from Thailand. Travel from Yangon to Moulmein is possible by both rail and road. Road conditions may vary, depending on the season, and the trip may take up to 8 hours. Only those in good health should attempt the journey. Historical Information: The notorious Burma-Siam railway, built by Commonwealth, Dutch and American prisoners of war, was a Japanese project driven by the need for improved communications to support the large Japanese army in Burma. During its construction, approximately 13,000 prisoners of war died and were buried along the railway. An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 civilians also died in the course of the project, chiefly forced labour brought from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, or conscripted in Siam (Thailand) and Burma (Myanmar). Two labour forces, one based in Siam and the other in Burma worked from opposite ends of the line towards the centre. The Japanese aimed at completing the railway in 14 months and work began in October 1942. The line, 424 kilometres long, was completed by December 1943. The graves of those who died during the construction and maintenance of the Burma-Siam railway (except for the Americans, whose remains were repatriated) were transferred from camp burial grounds and isolated sites along the railway into three cemeteries at Chungkai and Kanchanaburi in Thailand and Thanbyuzayat in Myanmar. Thanbyuzayat became a prisoner of war administration headquarters and base camp in September 1942 and in January 1943 a base hospital was organised for the sick. The camp was close to a railway marshalling yard and workshops, and heavy casualties were sustained among the prisoners during Allied bombing raids in March and June 1943. The camp was then evacuated and the prisoners, including the sick, were marched to camps further along the line where camp hospitals were set up. For some time, however, Thanbyuzayat continued to be used as a reception centre for the groups of prisoners arriving at frequent intervals to reinforce the parties working on the line up to the Burma-Siam border. Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery was created by the Army Graves Service who transferred to it all graves along the northern section of the railway, between Moulmein and Nieke. There are now 3,149 Commonwealth and 621 Dutch burials of the Second World war in the cemetery.

Family with parents
father
18721923
Birth: October 11, 1872 26 22Singleton, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1923Gosford, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
mother
18811928
Birth: April 13, 1881Collingwood, Victoria, Australia
Death: 1928Gosford, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
elder sister
19131988
Birth: January 29, 1913 40 31Darlington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 13, 1988Palm Beach, Queensland, Australia
brother
Private
sister
Private
himself
19191943
Birth: March 20, 1919 46 37Cabramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 13, 1943Myanmar
3 years
younger brother
19221984
Birth: May 5, 1922 49 41Woy Woy, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 7, 1984Nyngan, Central Western Slopes and Plains, New South Wales, Australia
Military

William served in World War II.

Death

William died as a prisoner of war working on the Burma-Siam Railway.

Burial

The village of Thanbyuzayat is 65 kilometres south of the port of Moulmein, and the war cemetery lies at the foot of the hills which separate the Union of Myanmar from Thailand. Travel from Yangon to Moulmein is possible by both rail and road. Road conditions may vary, depending on the season, and the trip may take up to 8 hours. Only those in good health should attempt the journey. Historical Information: The notorious Burma-Siam railway, built by Commonwealth, Dutch and American prisoners of war, was a Japanese project driven by the need for improved communications to support the large Japanese army in Burma. During its construction, approximately 13,000 prisoners of war died and were buried along the railway. An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 civilians also died in the course of the project, chiefly forced labour brought from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, or conscripted in Siam (Thailand) and Burma (Myanmar). Two labour forces, one based in Siam and the other in Burma worked from opposite ends of the line towards the centre. The Japanese aimed at completing the railway in 14 months and work began in October 1942. The line, 424 kilometres long, was completed by December 1943. The graves of those who died during the construction and maintenance of the Burma-Siam railway (except for the Americans, whose remains were repatriated) were transferred from camp burial grounds and isolated sites along the railway into three cemeteries at Chungkai and Kanchanaburi in Thailand and Thanbyuzayat in Myanmar. Thanbyuzayat became a prisoner of war administration headquarters and base camp in September 1942 and in January 1943 a base hospital was organised for the sick. The camp was close to a railway marshalling yard and workshops, and heavy casualties were sustained among the prisoners during Allied bombing raids in March and June 1943. The camp was then evacuated and the prisoners, including the sick, were marched to camps further along the line where camp hospitals were set up. For some time, however, Thanbyuzayat continued to be used as a reception centre for the groups of prisoners arriving at frequent intervals to reinforce the parties working on the line up to the Burma-Siam border. Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery was created by the Army Graves Service who transferred to it all graves along the northern section of the railway, between Moulmein and Nieke. There are now 3,149 Commonwealth and 621 Dutch burials of the Second World war in the cemetery.