Harold J. McKenzie, 19121921 (aged 8 years)

Name
Harold J. /McKenzie/
Given names
Harold J.
Surname
McKenzie
Birth August 26, 1912 36 34

Death January 3, 1921 (aged 8 years)
Cause of death: Run over by train
Note: Before the construction of Brisbane Water Drive in…

Before the construction of Brisbane Water Drive in the 1930s, the only way to reach Woy Woy by foot from the many holiday cottages at Parks and Murphy's Bay was to cross the railway bridge. This bridge had no pedestrian walkway attached. In early January 1921 a horrific accident occurred, where two adults and two children were overtaken and cut down by a train. Gosford resident Mrs Victor Mackenzie, accompanied by four of her children, aged from 2 ½ to 15 years, had gone to Woy Woy from Gosford to visit relatives Mr and Mrs Clifton Roughley at their rented holiday house at Parks Bay. Rain was falling, and darkness closing in when Mrs MacKenzie, Mr Roughley and the children headed south across the bridge to catch a train home from Woy Woy. Although they walked on the down (away from Sydney) side of the bridge to maximise visibility, it seems that one of the children wandered onto the opposite track just as a train approached heading south across the bridge. Mrs MacKenzie is believed to have tried to save the child. She herself had a baby in her arms, and Mr Roughley is believed to have tried to save all three. The baby Gladys was thrown from her mother's arms into Woy Woy Bay. Her body was found at Mount Pleasant, near Saratoga the next day. Another child, Bruce, had a remarkable escape from death when he managed to lay flat between the rails with the train passing over him. He was unscathed. This terrible accident paralysed the community. Mother and children were laid to rest in a single oak casket at Point Clare Cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest seen in the district at that time. When cars were still relatively rare in the district, 63 were counted at the cemetery. A bizarre coincidence occurred when on the same day as the above accident, Mr. Ambrose Whiting and his son were killed in a collision with a steam tram at Lennox Bridge, Parramatta. The Whiting, MacKenzie and Roughley families are related. On Wednesday, January 5, 1921, six persons, all related, victims of accidents occurring on the same day, were buried at Gosford, Dural and Parramatta.

Family with parents
father
18761957
Birth: February 11, 1876 28 26Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1957Gosford, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
mother
18781921
Birth: May 4, 1878
Death: January 3, 1921Woy Woy, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1897Ryde, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
elder sister
18981981
Birth: 1898 21 19Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 7, 1981
4 years
elder sister
19011994
Birth: 1901 24 22Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 7, 1994
3 years
elder brother
19031928
Birth: 1903 26 24Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1928Quirindi, North West Slopes and Plains, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
elder sister
19051992
Birth: about 1905 28 26
Death: October 10, 1992
4 years
elder brother
5 years
himself
19121921
Birth: August 26, 1912 36 34
Death: January 3, 1921Woy Woy, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
6 years
younger sister
19181921
Birth: May 13, 1918 42 40
Death: January 3, 1921Woy Woy, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
Father’s family with Lydia White
father
18761957
Birth: February 11, 1876 28 26Dural, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1957Gosford, Hunter, New South Wales, Australia
step-mother
18931980
Birth: 1893 25Paddington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 6, 1980Willoughby, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1922Burwood, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death

Before the construction of Brisbane Water Drive in the 1930s, the only way to reach Woy Woy by foot from the many holiday cottages at Parks and Murphy's Bay was to cross the railway bridge. This bridge had no pedestrian walkway attached. In early January 1921 a horrific accident occurred, where two adults and two children were overtaken and cut down by a train. Gosford resident Mrs Victor Mackenzie, accompanied by four of her children, aged from 2 ½ to 15 years, had gone to Woy Woy from Gosford to visit relatives Mr and Mrs Clifton Roughley at their rented holiday house at Parks Bay. Rain was falling, and darkness closing in when Mrs MacKenzie, Mr Roughley and the children headed south across the bridge to catch a train home from Woy Woy. Although they walked on the down (away from Sydney) side of the bridge to maximise visibility, it seems that one of the children wandered onto the opposite track just as a train approached heading south across the bridge. Mrs MacKenzie is believed to have tried to save the child. She herself had a baby in her arms, and Mr Roughley is believed to have tried to save all three. The baby Gladys was thrown from her mother's arms into Woy Woy Bay. Her body was found at Mount Pleasant, near Saratoga the next day. Another child, Bruce, had a remarkable escape from death when he managed to lay flat between the rails with the train passing over him. He was unscathed. This terrible accident paralysed the community. Mother and children were laid to rest in a single oak casket at Point Clare Cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest seen in the district at that time. When cars were still relatively rare in the district, 63 were counted at the cemetery. A bizarre coincidence occurred when on the same day as the above accident, Mr. Ambrose Whiting and his son were killed in a collision with a steam tram at Lennox Bridge, Parramatta. The Whiting, MacKenzie and Roughley families are related. On Wednesday, January 5, 1921, six persons, all related, victims of accidents occurring on the same day, were buried at Gosford, Dural and Parramatta.