Rosetta Pracey, 17701858 (aged 88 years)

Name
Rosetta /Pracey/
Given names
Rosetta
Surname
Pracey
Nickname
Rosey
Married name
Rosetta /Terry/
Married name
Rosetta /Madden/
Married name
Rosetta /Marsh/
Married name
Rosetta /Martin/
Married name
Rosetta /Jones/
Birth July 29, 1770 26
MarriageEdward MaddenView this family
before October 1798 (aged 28 years)

Text:

It seems probable that Rosetta Pracey married or was the common law wife of either or both Edward Madden or Henry Marsh/Martin prior to the departure of the ship 'Hillsborough' from Portsmouth in Oct 1798. Rosetta would certainly have been travelling to the colony aboard the 'Hillsborough' as the legal or common law wife of one of the convicts, although the name of that convict has not been recorded. Travelling with her was a son called Henry Marsh and another child, Esther Marsh was born in Sydney on 28 Apr 1800. All known references to Rosetta prior to her marriage to Samuel Terry give her name was Rosetta Marsh, and one as Martin. However, when in 1810 she married Samuel Terry, she described herself as 'Rosater Madden Widow'. By the time she married Terry it was probably more convenient for her to say that she was the widow of Madden rather than the common law wife of Marsh, and because Madden had died on the voyage, there was no-one who cared to dispute the claim.

MarriageHenry MarshView this family
before October 1798 (aged 28 years)

Text:

It seems probable that Rosetta Pracey married or was the common law wife of either or both Edward Madden or Henry Marsh/Martin/Jones prior to the departure of the ship 'Hillsborough' from Portsmouth in Oct 1798. Rosetta would certainly have been travelling to the colony aboard the 'Hillsborough' as the legal or common law wife of one of the convicts, although the name of that convict has not been recorded. Travelling with her was a son called Henry Marsh and another child, Esther Marsh was born in Sydney on 28 Apr 1800. All known references to Rosetta prior to her marriage to Samuel Terry give her name was Rosetta Marsh, and one as Martin. However, when in 1810 she married Samuel Terry, she described herself as 'Rosater Madden Widow'. By the time she married Terry it was probably more convenient for her to say that she was the widow of Madden rather than the common law wife of Marsh, and because Madden had died on the voyage, there was no-one who cared to dispute the claim.

Immigration July 16, 1799 (aged 28 years)
Text:

Rosetta had come free to the colony in 1799 in the disease-ridden ship 'Hillsborough'. The convicts were picked up from various prison hulks, one of which was infected with gaol fever (typhus). Soon after the ship departed Langstone Harbour near Portsmouth, disease broke out. The decks required caulking and when it rained shortly after departure the convict quarters became soaked. The captain was told that many of the convicts were out of their irons and intending to murder the officers. Those found out of their irons were flogged, receiving from one to six dozen lashes each, and were shackled and handcuffed, some with iron collars around their neck. Their allowance of rations and water were also reduced. Even after the disease spread throughout the convicts and deaths became alarmingly frequent, they were kept closely confined and double-ironed, were short of water and were half starved. One third of the 300 convicts died on the voyage, and several others died shortly after their arrival at Sydney. Governor John Hunter, when the 'Hillsborough' reached Sydney, described the survivors as 'the most wretched and miserable convicts I have ever beheld, in the most sickly and wretched state'. The resultant scandal led to the 'Hillsborough' being called the 'Death Ship'.

Census 1801 (aged 30 years)
Text:

The NSW Settlers' Muster Book, 1800, includes a list of expired or emancipated convicts and free people off the stores in 1801. In it appears 'Prisilla' Martin, resident of Sydney, who arrived aboard the 'Hillsborough' as a free person.

Property
Sydney Town, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
between 1803 and 1809 (aged 38 years)

Text:

On 1 May 1803 Governor King granted Rosetta a lease 'at Pitt Row in the township of Sydney 371/2 rods term of 14 years Annuel Quit Rent 10/-'. Details of farmland worked by Rosetta were listed on the muster of 12 Aug 1806:

'Rosetta Marsh. Came free Hillsborough 1799. Lives self. By lease. Potatoes 1/2 acre. Orchard 1/2 acre. Hogs one. In hand, wheat 2 bushels, maize one bushel. Proprietor and three children not victualled. 1 convict not victualled. 1 free man employed.'

In 1806 Rosetta bought a house and premises for £132, and acquired another house for £7 + 2s. a week. On 21 May 1807 she purchased a farm at Concord from Edward Edwards for £55/13/6d.

In Feb 1806 someone broke into her outhouse at Pitt Row and sole 'a firkin of butter that had been purchased the same evening, together with a box containing the servant's cloathing and sundry other articles'.

In Sep 1807 she accused James McGlade of stealing promissory notes with upwards of £150. When he tried to pass one of them off in the shop of T. Abbott, McGlade admitted picking it up in her house but claimed that he had asked Abbott to return it to her.

In 1808 she was among the traders who bought wine, spirits, and dried fruit in a cargo that arrived from Edinburgh. She paid £133 and Surgeon Harris £115, which suggests that she was not just a front woman for Harris's business interests as some have suggested. Her future husband, Samuel Terry spent just £3.

Rosetta became very propserous. In 1808 she was one of the few women among 800 persons described as 'Free and Principal Proprietors of Landed Property' who signed a petition to Governor Bligh asking him to make representations to the King for trade privileges and trial by jury. The petition was also signed by Terry and Harris.

Soon afterwards, Bligh was deposed in what became known as the 'Rum Rebellion' in which officers led by Macarthur and George Johnston mutinied against Bligh's attempts to supress their commercial activities. Rosetta subscribed £20 to a proposed fund to provide expenses to Macarthur and a presentation sword to Johnson. Harris also supported the rebellion.

In 1809 Rosetta received grants of 150 and 50 acres from Col. Paterson. She called this land 'Islington'. When Governor Macquarie arrived to replace Bligh, he reversed a number grants, including Rosetta's. Rosetta successfully appealed this decision on 12 Jan 1810 and the grant was backdated to 1 Jan 1810.

MarriageSamuel TerryView this family
March 27, 1810 (aged 39 years)

Address: St Philips
Text:

Samuel was an innkeeper at bachelor and Rosetta 'Madden' described herself as a widow.

Census November 1828 (aged 58 years)
Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

Terry, Samuel, 51, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, Protestant, merchant, 4 Pitt Street Sydney Terry, Rosetta, 51, came free, Hillsborough, 1799, Protestant Terry, John, 22, born in the colony Terry, Edward, 19, born in the colony Terry, Martha, 17, born in the colony

Death September 5, 1858 (aged 88 years)

Text:

Rosetta's personal weath excluding her land was valued at £27,000.

Burial
Cemetery: Old Sydney Burial Ground
Text:

The Hughes and Terry family vault contains the remains of Rosetta and about ten of her family. When the Sydney railway was extended in 1901 the vault and contents were removed to the Necropolis at Rookwood. The plaque commemorating Rosetta had now been lost but was recorded in 1901 and reads: POSETTA THE KIND AND BELOVED RELICT OF THE ABOVE SAMUEL TERRY WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE SEPTEMBER THE 5TH 1858 AGED 89 YEARS

Family with parents
father
mother
1787
Birth:
Death: 1787London, England, United Kingdom
Marriage
Marriage: June 9, 1767Shoreditch, London, England, United Kingdom
3 years
herself
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Family with Edward Madden
husband
1799
Birth: United Kingdom
Death: 1799The high Seas
herself
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
Family with Henry Marsh
husband
herself
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
1 month
son
17981825
Birth: before October 1798 28
Death: 1825Rangoon, Burma
19 months
daughter
18001873
Birth: April 28, 1800 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1873
Family with Samuel Terry
husband
17771838
Birth: about 1777
Death: February 22, 1838
herself
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: March 27, 1810
-3 years
son
18061842
Birth: about 1806 29 35
Death: 1842New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
18101838
Birth: April 26, 1810 33 39Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 28, 1838Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
18 months
daughter
18111877
Birth: October 31, 1811 34 41Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 30, 1877Penrith, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Samuel Terry + Mary Pritchard
husband
17771838
Birth: about 1777
Death: February 22, 1838
partner’s partner
17861865
Birth: about 1786
Death: December 11, 1865Werrington, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Not married
Not married: about 1808Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
BirthPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
MarriagePracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

It seems probable that Rosetta Pracey married or was the common law wife of either or both Edward Madden or Henry Marsh/Martin prior to the departure of the ship 'Hillsborough' from Portsmouth in Oct 1798. Rosetta would certainly have been travelling to the colony aboard the 'Hillsborough' as the legal or common law wife of one of the convicts, although the name of that convict has not been recorded. Travelling with her was a son called Henry Marsh and another child, Esther Marsh was born in Sydney on 28 Apr 1800. All known references to Rosetta prior to her marriage to Samuel Terry give her name was Rosetta Marsh, and one as Martin. However, when in 1810 she married Samuel Terry, she described herself as 'Rosater Madden Widow'. By the time she married Terry it was probably more convenient for her to say that she was the widow of Madden rather than the common law wife of Marsh, and because Madden had died on the voyage, there was no-one who cared to dispute the claim.

MarriagePracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

It seems probable that Rosetta Pracey married or was the common law wife of either or both Edward Madden or Henry Marsh/Martin/Jones prior to the departure of the ship 'Hillsborough' from Portsmouth in Oct 1798. Rosetta would certainly have been travelling to the colony aboard the 'Hillsborough' as the legal or common law wife of one of the convicts, although the name of that convict has not been recorded. Travelling with her was a son called Henry Marsh and another child, Esther Marsh was born in Sydney on 28 Apr 1800. All known references to Rosetta prior to her marriage to Samuel Terry give her name was Rosetta Marsh, and one as Martin. However, when in 1810 she married Samuel Terry, she described herself as 'Rosater Madden Widow'. By the time she married Terry it was probably more convenient for her to say that she was the widow of Madden rather than the common law wife of Marsh, and because Madden had died on the voyage, there was no-one who cared to dispute the claim.

ImmigrationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
ImmigrationPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

Rosetta had come free to the colony in 1799 in the disease-ridden ship 'Hillsborough'. The convicts were picked up from various prison hulks, one of which was infected with gaol fever (typhus). Soon after the ship departed Langstone Harbour near Portsmouth, disease broke out. The decks required caulking and when it rained shortly after departure the convict quarters became soaked. The captain was told that many of the convicts were out of their irons and intending to murder the officers. Those found out of their irons were flogged, receiving from one to six dozen lashes each, and were shackled and handcuffed, some with iron collars around their neck. Their allowance of rations and water were also reduced. Even after the disease spread throughout the convicts and deaths became alarmingly frequent, they were kept closely confined and double-ironed, were short of water and were half starved. One third of the 300 convicts died on the voyage, and several others died shortly after their arrival at Sydney. Governor John Hunter, when the 'Hillsborough' reached Sydney, described the survivors as 'the most wretched and miserable convicts I have ever beheld, in the most sickly and wretched state'. The resultant scandal led to the 'Hillsborough' being called the 'Death Ship'.

CensusPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

The NSW Settlers' Muster Book, 1800, includes a list of expired or emancipated convicts and free people off the stores in 1801. In it appears 'Prisilla' Martin, resident of Sydney, who arrived aboard the 'Hillsborough' as a free person.

PropertyPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

On 1 May 1803 Governor King granted Rosetta a lease 'at Pitt Row in the township of Sydney 371/2 rods term of 14 years Annuel Quit Rent 10/-'. Details of farmland worked by Rosetta were listed on the muster of 12 Aug 1806:

'Rosetta Marsh. Came free Hillsborough 1799. Lives self. By lease. Potatoes 1/2 acre. Orchard 1/2 acre. Hogs one. In hand, wheat 2 bushels, maize one bushel. Proprietor and three children not victualled. 1 convict not victualled. 1 free man employed.'

In 1806 Rosetta bought a house and premises for £132, and acquired another house for £7 + 2s. a week. On 21 May 1807 she purchased a farm at Concord from Edward Edwards for £55/13/6d.

In Feb 1806 someone broke into her outhouse at Pitt Row and sole 'a firkin of butter that had been purchased the same evening, together with a box containing the servant's cloathing and sundry other articles'.

In Sep 1807 she accused James McGlade of stealing promissory notes with upwards of £150. When he tried to pass one of them off in the shop of T. Abbott, McGlade admitted picking it up in her house but claimed that he had asked Abbott to return it to her.

In 1808 she was among the traders who bought wine, spirits, and dried fruit in a cargo that arrived from Edinburgh. She paid £133 and Surgeon Harris £115, which suggests that she was not just a front woman for Harris's business interests as some have suggested. Her future husband, Samuel Terry spent just £3.

Rosetta became very propserous. In 1808 she was one of the few women among 800 persons described as 'Free and Principal Proprietors of Landed Property' who signed a petition to Governor Bligh asking him to make representations to the King for trade privileges and trial by jury. The petition was also signed by Terry and Harris.

Soon afterwards, Bligh was deposed in what became known as the 'Rum Rebellion' in which officers led by Macarthur and George Johnston mutinied against Bligh's attempts to supress their commercial activities. Rosetta subscribed £20 to a proposed fund to provide expenses to Macarthur and a presentation sword to Johnson. Harris also supported the rebellion.

In 1809 Rosetta received grants of 150 and 50 acres from Col. Paterson. She called this land 'Islington'. When Governor Macquarie arrived to replace Bligh, he reversed a number grants, including Rosetta's. Rosetta successfully appealed this decision on 12 Jan 1810 and the grant was backdated to 1 Jan 1810.

MarriageAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

Samuel was an innkeeper at bachelor and Rosetta 'Madden' described herself as a widow.

MarriageHardy, Bobbie. Early Hawkesbury settlers. Kenthurst: Kangaroo Press, 1985
CensusCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Citation details:

p. 364

Text:

Terry, Samuel, 51, free by servitude, Earl Cornwallis, 1801, Protestant, merchant, 4 Pitt Street Sydney Terry, Rosetta, 51, came free, Hillsborough, 1799, Protestant Terry, John, 22, born in the colony Terry, Edward, 19, born in the colony Terry, Martha, 17, born in the colony

DeathAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
DeathPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

Rosetta's personal weath excluding her land was valued at £27,000.

BurialPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

The Hughes and Terry family vault contains the remains of Rosetta and about ten of her family. When the Sydney railway was extended in 1901 the vault and contents were removed to the Necropolis at Rookwood. The plaque commemorating Rosetta had now been lost but was recorded in 1901 and reads: POSETTA THE KIND AND BELOVED RELICT OF THE ABOVE SAMUEL TERRY WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE SEPTEMBER THE 5TH 1858 AGED 89 YEARS