William Ezzy, 17681830 (aged 62 years)

Name
William /Ezzy/
Given names
William
Surname
Ezzy
Name
William /Izzy/
Given names
William
Surname
Izzy
Name
William /Ezzey/
Given names
William
Surname
Ezzey
Name
William /Hizzy/
Given names
William
Surname
Hizzy
Birth
about 1768
Christening
Text:

William Hizzy christened 23 Feb 1768 at Beenham Berkshire, son of William Hizzy and Mary. A brother Richard was christened on the same day.

Marriage
Address: St Dunstans Church
Immigration
Text:

William was a brewer's servant in London. He was arrested and indicted as 'William Izzy' for stealing a wooden cask and 36 gallons of yeast from a London warehouse. At the Old Bailey on 7 Dec 1791 he was sentenced to 7 years' transportation and was transported aboard the ship 'Royal Admiral' in 1792, arriving in the colony on 7 Oct 1792.
On board also was his wife, who came free, Jane Floid [sic] and two children. The ship's indent describes William as a man of above average height with black hair.

Text:

Old Bailey transcript 7 Dec 1791:
ROBERT TIRESMAN and WILLIAM IZZY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November last, a wooden cask, value 5 s. and 36 gallons of yeast, value 16 s. the property of Felix Calvert, Robert Ladbroke, William Whitmore, Robert Calvert, and Charles Calvert : And THOMAS WATMORE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen.
(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)
(The witnesses examined separate.)
RICHARD DIGGINS sworn.
I am a watchman of the ward of Aldgate; I have seen the prisoner Watmore once, and the other two a great many times; I was directed to watch the two first prisoners; about the beginning of November I saw them come through Aldgate High-street into Whitechapel, that is the road from Tooley-street to Petticoat-lane; they had a sledge with no wheels, and a barrel, and a tub like a half barrel; I spoke to John Jameson ; I did not go to Watmore's house; I went where they went to on the return along Fenchurch-street, Fish-street, over London-bridge, to Tooley-street, about half after four, when they returned, the place looked then like a brewhouse; I have since found it was a storehouse belonging to Messrs. Calvert and Co.; I observed they took a sledge and a barrel, nothing else; I observed a difference in the sound, that there was something in the barrels as they came towards Petticoat-lane, and empty when they returned; I took the prisoners the 19th of November, about four in the morning; the two first prisoners were coming again along with the sledge, and a barrel and tub upon it, as usual; I jumped across, and stopped the horse; Tiresman asked me what right I had to stop it; I told him I understood it was spirits or gin; he said, no, nothing but yeast from Mr. Calvert's; I said it was my duty to stop him; if he would go to the watch-house, we had officers that were looking after smugglers; he said, we will go back, and leave the sledge here; I said no, and they went with the sledge to the watch-house; they walked in; they saw no officers; I told them they would be there presently; with that, Tiresman says, we may as well shoot this barrel down here, and go for another turn, and by that time your officers will be come; I went and fetched the beadle, and the prisoner Tiresman shewed us a key of a storehouse, marked Rupert-street, Whitechapel; we told him he had better tell where he brought it from; he said, from Mr. Calvert's; the prisoners were secured; in the barrel there was yeast, and nothing in the tub, that I look upon to be a receiver; I did not go to Watmore after the 19th.
JOHN JAMESON sworn.
I am a watchman in Aldgate High-street; I remember, the beginning of November, seeing the two first prisoners with a sledge; they went into Boar's-head court, Petticoat-lane; they came out about a quarter of an hour; I did not like to go into the court, it is a very bad place; Mr. Watmore lives in the court, but I do not know the house, or the number; they came back again with an empty cask, because it rumbled and tumbled on the sledge, and before it was solid and steady.
THOMAS PINNER sworn.
I am the constable of the night; I was in bed; I took the charge; they had a cask of yeast, containing 36 gallons, which they said they brought from Calvert's.
WILLIAM BOX sworn.
I am a constable; I went to a house in Petticoat-lane, where Flood lives, in Boar's-head yard, the 19th of November; Flood works for Watmore; I saw Watmore and Flood at Mr. Flood's, putting a cask down a cellar; I took no notice; I went and fetched Mr. Read, and we went back and found the same cask in the cellar; nothing else was in the cellar but the cask.
JAMES READ sworn.
I am storehouse-clerk to Messrs. Calvert and Co. the prisoner Tiresman and Izzy's business was to carry yeast; the value of a cask of yeast is 16 s.; they had no business to carry it to Rupert-street, but to Thames-street; seven in the morning is time enough; they certainly had no orders to carry any on the 7th or 8th, or on the 19th; I went to Flood's house, and saw a cask in the cellar; it is the property of Messrs. Calvert and Co.; we sell none of that kind; one and has Felix Calvert and Co.; the value of it is 5 s.
JOHN HOLDBEACH sworn.
I am an attorney. (Deposed to the firm.)
(The two first prisoners called seven witnesses, and the last prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave them very good characters.)
ROBERT TIRESMAN, WILLIAM IZZY,
GUILTY.
Transported for seven years .
THOMAS WATMORE, NOT GUILTY.
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Property
Cornwallis, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
after 1796 (aged 28 years)
Text:

Jane, as a free woman, was allowed to purchase 30 acres at Cornwallis in 1797. The farm was listed in William's name in 1802. William received a grant of 130 acres in 1804 (on the present site of Richmond areodrome).
By 1810 John Bolton (7 years, 'Hillsborough' 1799) was sharing their home and farm. In 1811 Ezzy and Bolton offered the farm for sale, but it apparently was not sold.
In May 1812 Bolton opened a Sydney Inn, and December again put the farm on the market. It was not sold, but the partnership was dissolved, with Ezzy disclaiming responsibility for Bolton's debts.
By 1814 Jane Ezzy and six of her children were living with John Bolton in Sydney. During 1815 feelings ran high over the ownership of the now rented Windsor farm, but some of the family were living there in 1816 on the day lightning struck. 16 year old Mary was ironing her wedding dress, and brother John too was in the room. John could do nothing as Mary's hair caught fire. Jane, coming from Sydney to attend her daughter's wedding, arrived to attend her funeral.
Despite the tragedy, there was continuing family dissention. William gave notice, that Jane, having left home, her debts were not his business. John cautioned against dealings with his mother who had made off with the deeds to the farm which had been made over to him by his father. Jane responded with a spirited defence 'she herself had bought the farm and had always traded as 'feme sole' not as William Ezzy's wife. She owned the farm, and would take the matter to the Supreme Court if necessary.
James Ezzy died John Bolton then took up the cudgels, announcing that if the next of kin (Jane) did not apply for the administration of James' estate, he, as creditor, would do so.
Where it all ended we do not know. Jane never returned to the Hawkesbury where her family was establishing firm roots by intermarriage. The Ezzy name would remain well known in Richmond, Kurrajong and on the Namoi River.
Jane, the year before she died, applied for a Sydney beer licence. She may have destroyed the deeds to the farm which were not found among her papers, and in due course the grant reverted to the Crown. William finally married his elderly housekeeper.

Grant of Land
Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Sun 4 Nov 1804 Page 1
Text:

"SECRETARY'S OFFICE.
Pct 30, 1504 [sic].
WHEREAS, the following Persons having obtained Grants of Land in Trust for the Benefit of their Children; and as some of those Deeds have been delivered; and others now remain in this Office, this is to require the following Persons to attend here at as early a day as convenient to receive the same; and those possessed of Grants delivered as above, whose Names may appear in the List subjoined, are requested to bring the former Grants they hold for their Children, in order to a necessary Regulation being made therein, viz.
John Cobcroft
Edward Robinson
John Hillas
Daniel Smallwood
William Eaton
Thomas Dargon
Simon Freebody
Matthew Locke
Benjamin Jones
William Ezzey
Joseph Smith
David Brown
William Singleton
Richard Ridge, &
Thomas Biggers.
D.D. MANN, Clerk."

Census
Text:

The 1828 census shows William Ezzey [sic] aged 66, free by servitude, a farmer of Cornwallis with 26 acres, 21 cleared, 16 cultivated and with 1 horse and 4 cattle.

Marriage
Text:

V18294538 3B/1829 EZZEY WILLIAM MILLS JANE CC
V1829921 13/1829 EZZEY WILLIAM MILLS JANE CC
(St Matthews Church of England, Windsor)

Death
Burial
Cemetery: St Matthews Church of England Cemetery
Note: There is no longer a headstone and the exact site of his burial in the churchyard is unknown.
Family with parents
father
himself
17681830
Birth: about 1768
Death: 1830New South Wales, Australia
Family with Jane Floyd
himself
17681830
Birth: about 1768
Death: 1830New South Wales, Australia
wife
17701821
Birth: about 1770
Death: August 11, 1821Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage MarriageAugust 13, 1788Stepney, London, England, United Kingdom
2 years
son
17901817
Birth: 1790 22 20 Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: before 1817
2 years
daughter
17921792
Birth: January 8, 1792 24 22 Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
17951869
Birth: about 1795 27 25 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 28, 1869Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
17981875
Birth: March 19, 1798 30 28 New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1875Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18001816
Birth: 1800 32 30 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 17, 1816Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18021854
Birth: about 1802 34 32 Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 29, 1854Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18051855
Birth: October 5, 1805 37 35 Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 20, 1855Central Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18071884
Birth: 1807 39 37 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1884Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Jane Mills
himself
17681830
Birth: about 1768
Death: 1830New South Wales, Australia
wife
17671835
Christening: about 1767
Death: 1835New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriage1829Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Christening
Text:

William Hizzy christened 23 Feb 1768 at Beenham Berkshire, son of William Hizzy and Mary. A brother Richard was christened on the same day.

Marriage
Citation details: User submitted trees
Immigration
Text:

William was a brewer's servant in London. He was arrested and indicted as 'William Izzy' for stealing a wooden cask and 36 gallons of yeast from a London warehouse. At the Old Bailey on 7 Dec 1791 he was sentenced to 7 years' transportation and was transported aboard the ship 'Royal Admiral' in 1792, arriving in the colony on 7 Oct 1792.
On board also was his wife, who came free, Jane Floid [sic] and two children. The ship's indent describes William as a man of above average height with black hair.

Text:

Old Bailey transcript 7 Dec 1791:
ROBERT TIRESMAN and WILLIAM IZZY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November last, a wooden cask, value 5 s. and 36 gallons of yeast, value 16 s. the property of Felix Calvert, Robert Ladbroke, William Whitmore, Robert Calvert, and Charles Calvert : And THOMAS WATMORE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen.
(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)
(The witnesses examined separate.)
RICHARD DIGGINS sworn.
I am a watchman of the ward of Aldgate; I have seen the prisoner Watmore once, and the other two a great many times; I was directed to watch the two first prisoners; about the beginning of November I saw them come through Aldgate High-street into Whitechapel, that is the road from Tooley-street to Petticoat-lane; they had a sledge with no wheels, and a barrel, and a tub like a half barrel; I spoke to John Jameson ; I did not go to Watmore's house; I went where they went to on the return along Fenchurch-street, Fish-street, over London-bridge, to Tooley-street, about half after four, when they returned, the place looked then like a brewhouse; I have since found it was a storehouse belonging to Messrs. Calvert and Co.; I observed they took a sledge and a barrel, nothing else; I observed a difference in the sound, that there was something in the barrels as they came towards Petticoat-lane, and empty when they returned; I took the prisoners the 19th of November, about four in the morning; the two first prisoners were coming again along with the sledge, and a barrel and tub upon it, as usual; I jumped across, and stopped the horse; Tiresman asked me what right I had to stop it; I told him I understood it was spirits or gin; he said, no, nothing but yeast from Mr. Calvert's; I said it was my duty to stop him; if he would go to the watch-house, we had officers that were looking after smugglers; he said, we will go back, and leave the sledge here; I said no, and they went with the sledge to the watch-house; they walked in; they saw no officers; I told them they would be there presently; with that, Tiresman says, we may as well shoot this barrel down here, and go for another turn, and by that time your officers will be come; I went and fetched the beadle, and the prisoner Tiresman shewed us a key of a storehouse, marked Rupert-street, Whitechapel; we told him he had better tell where he brought it from; he said, from Mr. Calvert's; the prisoners were secured; in the barrel there was yeast, and nothing in the tub, that I look upon to be a receiver; I did not go to Watmore after the 19th.
JOHN JAMESON sworn.
I am a watchman in Aldgate High-street; I remember, the beginning of November, seeing the two first prisoners with a sledge; they went into Boar's-head court, Petticoat-lane; they came out about a quarter of an hour; I did not like to go into the court, it is a very bad place; Mr. Watmore lives in the court, but I do not know the house, or the number; they came back again with an empty cask, because it rumbled and tumbled on the sledge, and before it was solid and steady.
THOMAS PINNER sworn.
I am the constable of the night; I was in bed; I took the charge; they had a cask of yeast, containing 36 gallons, which they said they brought from Calvert's.
WILLIAM BOX sworn.
I am a constable; I went to a house in Petticoat-lane, where Flood lives, in Boar's-head yard, the 19th of November; Flood works for Watmore; I saw Watmore and Flood at Mr. Flood's, putting a cask down a cellar; I took no notice; I went and fetched Mr. Read, and we went back and found the same cask in the cellar; nothing else was in the cellar but the cask.
JAMES READ sworn.
I am storehouse-clerk to Messrs. Calvert and Co. the prisoner Tiresman and Izzy's business was to carry yeast; the value of a cask of yeast is 16 s.; they had no business to carry it to Rupert-street, but to Thames-street; seven in the morning is time enough; they certainly had no orders to carry any on the 7th or 8th, or on the 19th; I went to Flood's house, and saw a cask in the cellar; it is the property of Messrs. Calvert and Co.; we sell none of that kind; one and has Felix Calvert and Co.; the value of it is 5 s.
JOHN HOLDBEACH sworn.
I am an attorney. (Deposed to the firm.)
(The two first prisoners called seven witnesses, and the last prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave them very good characters.)
ROBERT TIRESMAN, WILLIAM IZZY,
GUILTY.
Transported for seven years .
THOMAS WATMORE, NOT GUILTY.
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Property
Text:

Jane, as a free woman, was allowed to purchase 30 acres at Cornwallis in 1797. The farm was listed in William's name in 1802. William received a grant of 130 acres in 1804 (on the present site of Richmond areodrome).
By 1810 John Bolton (7 years, 'Hillsborough' 1799) was sharing their home and farm. In 1811 Ezzy and Bolton offered the farm for sale, but it apparently was not sold.
In May 1812 Bolton opened a Sydney Inn, and December again put the farm on the market. It was not sold, but the partnership was dissolved, with Ezzy disclaiming responsibility for Bolton's debts.
By 1814 Jane Ezzy and six of her children were living with John Bolton in Sydney. During 1815 feelings ran high over the ownership of the now rented Windsor farm, but some of the family were living there in 1816 on the day lightning struck. 16 year old Mary was ironing her wedding dress, and brother John too was in the room. John could do nothing as Mary's hair caught fire. Jane, coming from Sydney to attend her daughter's wedding, arrived to attend her funeral.
Despite the tragedy, there was continuing family dissention. William gave notice, that Jane, having left home, her debts were not his business. John cautioned against dealings with his mother who had made off with the deeds to the farm which had been made over to him by his father. Jane responded with a spirited defence 'she herself had bought the farm and had always traded as 'feme sole' not as William Ezzy's wife. She owned the farm, and would take the matter to the Supreme Court if necessary.
James Ezzy died John Bolton then took up the cudgels, announcing that if the next of kin (Jane) did not apply for the administration of James' estate, he, as creditor, would do so.
Where it all ended we do not know. Jane never returned to the Hawkesbury where her family was establishing firm roots by intermarriage. The Ezzy name would remain well known in Richmond, Kurrajong and on the Namoi River.
Jane, the year before she died, applied for a Sydney beer licence. She may have destroyed the deeds to the farm which were not found among her papers, and in due course the grant reverted to the Crown. William finally married his elderly housekeeper.

Grant of Land
Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Sun 4 Nov 1804 Page 1
Text:

"SECRETARY'S OFFICE.
Pct 30, 1504 [sic].
WHEREAS, the following Persons having obtained Grants of Land in Trust for the Benefit of their Children; and as some of those Deeds have been delivered; and others now remain in this Office, this is to require the following Persons to attend here at as early a day as convenient to receive the same; and those possessed of Grants delivered as above, whose Names may appear in the List subjoined, are requested to bring the former Grants they hold for their Children, in order to a necessary Regulation being made therein, viz.
John Cobcroft
Edward Robinson
John Hillas
Daniel Smallwood
William Eaton
Thomas Dargon
Simon Freebody
Matthew Locke
Benjamin Jones
William Ezzey
Joseph Smith
David Brown
William Singleton
Richard Ridge, &
Thomas Biggers.
D.D. MANN, Clerk."

Census
Text:

The 1828 census shows William Ezzey [sic] aged 66, free by servitude, a farmer of Cornwallis with 26 acres, 21 cleared, 16 cultivated and with 1 horse and 4 cattle.

Marriage
Text:

V18294538 3B/1829 EZZEY WILLIAM MILLS JANE CC
V1829921 13/1829 EZZEY WILLIAM MILLS JANE CC
(St Matthews Church of England, Windsor)

Death
Text:

V18309029 2C/1830 EZZY WILLIAM AGE 65
V1830479 14/1830 EZZY WILLIAM AGE 65

Burial

There is no longer a headstone and the exact site of his burial in the churchyard is unknown.