Jane Floyd, 17701821 (aged 51 years)

Name
Jane /Floyd/
Given names
Jane
Surname
Floyd
Name
Jane /Ezzy/
Type of name
married name
Name
Jane /Izzy/
Type of name
married name
Name
Jane /Ezzey/
Type of name
married name
Name
Jane /Hizzy/
Type of name
married name
Name
Jane /Floid/
Given names
Jane
Surname
Floid
Birth
about 1770
Christening
Address: St Lukes
Marriage
Address: St Dunstans Church
Immigration
Note: Jane was one of the first 'free' women to arrive in the colony. Jane's husband William was convicted of stealing a cask of yeast from a London warehouse at the Old Bailey in 1791 to 7 years and transported on the ship 'Royal Admiral' in 1792. Jane Floid [sic] and two children accompanied him.
Property
Cornwallis, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
after 1796 (aged 26 years)
Text:

Jane, as a free woman, was allowed to purchase 30 acres at Cornwallis in 1797. The farm was listed in William's name in 1802.

William received a grant of 130 acres in 1804 (on the present site of Richmond areodrome).

By 1810 John Bolton (7 years, 'Hillsborough' 1799) was sharing their home and farm. In 1811 Ezzy and Bolton offered the farm for sale, but it apparently was not sold.

In May 1812 Bolton opened a Sydney Inn, and December again put the farm on the market. It was not sold, but the partnership was dissolved, with Ezzy disclaiming responsibility for Bolton's debts.

Jane lived with Boulton at certain times. It is believed however that Jane's association with Boulton was primarily a business one, as they were legal business partners, in 1812 forming 'Boulton & Co.' and purchasing a property in both their names at No. 49 George Street Sydney. On 16 may of the same year they placed an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette promoting their new venture:

'...opened for accommodation and have a few Hogsheads of excellent Wine for Sale. And for the Accommodation of Settlers will receive approved Colonial Currency or Pigs in Payment'.

Several years later the property was advertised for sale and described as being 'on the corner of the spaceous avenue leading into Hyde Park which would have been on the extremities of the town and which is currently the Markets area of the city.

In 1813, Jane purchased John Boulton's half share of 49 George Street for the sum of 10 pounds. Ina bout 1814 she sold it back to Boulton who was by that time a publican of the 'Swan and Two Necks' in Cambridge Street, the Rocks, where it is believed Jane now also resided.

John Boulton sold 49 George Street on 25 Feb 1815 for 200 pounds.

During 1815 feelings ran high over the ownership of the now rented Windsor farm. William, Jane and Boulton all claimed ownership of it.

William gave notice, that Jane, having left home, her debts were not his business. John cautioned against dealings with his mother who had made off with the deeds to the farm which had been made over to him by his father. Jane responded with a spirited defence 'she herself had bought the farm and had always traded as 'feme sole' not as William Ezzy's wife. She owned the farm, and would take the matter to the Supreme Court if necessary.

James Ezzy died and John Bolton then took up the cudgels, announcing that if the next of kin (Jane) did not apply for the administration of James' estate, he, as creditor, would do so.

Where it all ended we do not know. Jane never returned to the Hawkesbury where her family was establishing firm roots by intermarriage. The Ezzy name would remain well known in Richmond, Kurrajong and on the Namoi River.

Jane, the year before she died, applied for a Sydney beer licence. She may have destroyed the deeds to the farm which were not found among her papers, and in due course the grant reverted to the Crown, with the deeds not issued to a new owner for almost 10 years. William finally married his elderly housekeeper.

All records indicate that John Boulton, who was in Parramatta gaol from late 1816 until 1817, left the colony in 1819 as advertised and that Jane owned an inn in her own right. Jane is believed to have spent the last years of her life living in the Rocks area.

By the time of her death she owned 2 houses, which she left to her youngest daughters.

Death
Burial
Cemetery: Old Sydney Burial Ground
Note: Her remains were later moved to Botany Cemetery.
Family with William Ezzy
husband
17681830
Birth: about 1768
Death: 1830New South Wales, Australia
herself
17701821
Birth: about 1770
Death: August 11, 1821Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage MarriageAugust 13, 1788Stepney, London, England, United Kingdom
2 years
son
17901817
Birth: 1790 22 20 Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: before 1817
2 years
daughter
17921792
Birth: January 8, 1792 24 22 Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
17951869
Birth: about 1795 27 25 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 28, 1869Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
17981875
Birth: March 19, 1798 30 28 New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1875Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18001816
Birth: 1800 32 30 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 17, 1816Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18021854
Birth: about 1802 34 32 Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 29, 1854Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18051855
Birth: October 5, 1805 37 35 Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 20, 1855Central Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18071884
Birth: 1807 39 37 Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1884Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
William Ezzy + Jane Mills
husband
17681830
Birth: about 1768
Death: 1830New South Wales, Australia
husband’s wife
17671835
Christening: about 1767
Death: 1835New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriage1829Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Citation details: User submitted trees
Immigration
Property
Text:

Jane, as a free woman, was allowed to purchase 30 acres at Cornwallis in 1797. The farm was listed in William's name in 1802.

William received a grant of 130 acres in 1804 (on the present site of Richmond areodrome).

By 1810 John Bolton (7 years, 'Hillsborough' 1799) was sharing their home and farm. In 1811 Ezzy and Bolton offered the farm for sale, but it apparently was not sold.

In May 1812 Bolton opened a Sydney Inn, and December again put the farm on the market. It was not sold, but the partnership was dissolved, with Ezzy disclaiming responsibility for Bolton's debts.

Jane lived with Boulton at certain times. It is believed however that Jane's association with Boulton was primarily a business one, as they were legal business partners, in 1812 forming 'Boulton & Co.' and purchasing a property in both their names at No. 49 George Street Sydney. On 16 may of the same year they placed an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette promoting their new venture:

'...opened for accommodation and have a few Hogsheads of excellent Wine for Sale. And for the Accommodation of Settlers will receive approved Colonial Currency or Pigs in Payment'.

Several years later the property was advertised for sale and described as being 'on the corner of the spaceous avenue leading into Hyde Park which would have been on the extremities of the town and which is currently the Markets area of the city.

In 1813, Jane purchased John Boulton's half share of 49 George Street for the sum of 10 pounds. Ina bout 1814 she sold it back to Boulton who was by that time a publican of the 'Swan and Two Necks' in Cambridge Street, the Rocks, where it is believed Jane now also resided.

John Boulton sold 49 George Street on 25 Feb 1815 for 200 pounds.

During 1815 feelings ran high over the ownership of the now rented Windsor farm. William, Jane and Boulton all claimed ownership of it.

William gave notice, that Jane, having left home, her debts were not his business. John cautioned against dealings with his mother who had made off with the deeds to the farm which had been made over to him by his father. Jane responded with a spirited defence 'she herself had bought the farm and had always traded as 'feme sole' not as William Ezzy's wife. She owned the farm, and would take the matter to the Supreme Court if necessary.

James Ezzy died and John Bolton then took up the cudgels, announcing that if the next of kin (Jane) did not apply for the administration of James' estate, he, as creditor, would do so.

Where it all ended we do not know. Jane never returned to the Hawkesbury where her family was establishing firm roots by intermarriage. The Ezzy name would remain well known in Richmond, Kurrajong and on the Namoi River.

Jane, the year before she died, applied for a Sydney beer licence. She may have destroyed the deeds to the farm which were not found among her papers, and in due course the grant reverted to the Crown, with the deeds not issued to a new owner for almost 10 years. William finally married his elderly housekeeper.

All records indicate that John Boulton, who was in Parramatta gaol from late 1816 until 1817, left the colony in 1819 as advertised and that Jane owned an inn in her own right. Jane is believed to have spent the last years of her life living in the Rocks area.

By the time of her death she owned 2 houses, which she left to her youngest daughters.

Immigration

Jane was one of the first 'free' women to arrive in the colony. Jane's husband William was convicted of stealing a cask of yeast from a London warehouse at the Old Bailey in 1791 to 7 years and transported on the ship 'Royal Admiral' in 1792. Jane Floid [sic] and two children accompanied him.

Burial

Her remains were later moved to Botany Cemetery.