Mary Hutchinson, 17651850 (aged 84 years)

Name
Mary /Hutchinson/
Given names
Mary
Surname
Hutchinson
Married name
Mary /Weavers/
Married name
Mary /Porter/
Birth May 23, 1765 28
Immigration July 9, 1791 (aged 26 years)
Text:

ANN HUTCHINSON and MARY HUTCHINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December one cotton gown, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a pair of ruffles, value 12 d. two aprons, value 10 s. two ditto, value 3 s. a night cap, value 6 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. a linen pocket, value 12 d. and 11 s. in monies numbered, the property of Ann Body, in the dwelling-house of Ann Hutchinson . ANN BODY sworn. I lived last at Chelsea. I am a housekeeper. I was at Ann Hutchinson 's house in Cross-lane, Saint Giles's, at nine in the evening, to lodge there; I do not know how I came there; I met the prisoner in Holborn, and she took me to her house. I lost a cotton gown, value twelve shillings, a black silk cloak, value five shillings, four neck handkerchiefs, value three shillings, a pair of worked muslin ruffles, value two shillings, two muslin aprons, one value twelve shillings, the other, value nine shillings, two linen aprons, value four shillings, two pocket handkerchiefs, value sixteen-pence, a night cap, value four-pence, two pair of cotton stockings, value four shillings, a linen pocket, value ten-pence, and the money I am positive to is eleven shillings; I lost them at the place where Ann Hutchinson lived: I saw the daughter. I was going to my lodgings in Henrietta-street, in Oxford-street: I met Ann Hutchinson in Holborn, and she accosted me; why you are frightened? no, says I, I am not frightened, but I wish I could get a lodging nearer than where I am; she said, I should be welcome to her house; and sent her young child to Scotch Court, Cross-lane, Saint Giles's; when I got there I undressed myself and went to bed, and placed my things in a chair by the bed side; about nine, after I had been asleep two or three hours, I heard a great noise; I saw both the prisoners come into the room; her daughter came to the bed side and asked her mother what business she had to take in any body to lodge there; the mother desired her to make no noise for she should pay well for sleeping here: the daughter came to the bed side, and said, I should not lay any longer, and said it was the custom of that house, that whoever lay there should pay two shillings for gin, and she took my pockets from me, and insisted on having the contents, and she took from my pocket eleven shillings and some halfpence; she then brought the glass and the gin, and insisted I should drink; I would not, but she made me drink it because I was afraid of her; then she forced me by holding my shoulder and made me drink a second glass, which intoxicated me; then she took my bundle away and returned again in a few minutes without the bundle, and then told me to go about my business; the old prisoner was much in liquor; she was present. I asked her for my bundle; she swore I never brought any bundle there; she then gave the candle to her younger sister to light me down; she would not; then the prisoner took the candle and lighted me down: I said I would not go without my money and bundle; then she said, if I would not by fair means I should by foul means; she took me by the two shoulders and shoved me out of the room, and from thence out of the house; I asked the daughter to shew me into Holborn; she would not. I met two watchmen, and told them I had been robbed; they told me I was a woman of the town, and said I was a dirty hussey, and if I did not go about my business he would take me to the watch-house; I then met another watchman, I told him; he went with me to the house, but we could not find any thing of mine; then I saw Mr. Treadway, who searched the room, and found a cap, a black cloak, two handkerchiefs, and a cotton stocking. EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. I am a constable. On Saturday night last between two and three o'clock the watchman brought in the two prisoners; I went and searched with a candle, and broke open the door, and under a fish basket I found a black cloak in the ashes, this handkerchief under the bed, this cap and apron, this handkerchief in another corner of the room; I found nothing else. The prosecutrix was in liquor: she said the prisoners forced her to drink gin. (The things produced and deposed to, the handkerchief marked A. G. the stockings marked with an A.) How came the handkerchief to be marked A. G.? - Because I changed a handkerchief I had with a fellow servant at Chelsea, whose name was Ann Green. Prisoners. We are innocent; we have no witnesses. ANN HUTCHINSON, MARY HUTCHINSON, GUILTY, 39 s. Transported for seven years. The Court ordered Treadway a liberal allowance for his expences. Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Text:

Ann Hutchinson, one of 106 convicts transported on the ship Mary Ann January 1791. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years. Vessel: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary. Date of Departure: January 1791. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

MarriageJames WeaversView this family
1792 (aged 26 years)
MarriageRichard PorterView this family
June 8, 1811 (aged 46 years)
Text:

From about 1805, Richard lived with Mary Hutchinson (b. abt 1765), and they were married on 8 Jun 1811 at St Philips Sydney.

Census November 1828 (aged 63 years)
Citation details:

p. 304

Text:

Porter, Richard, 62, absolute pardon, Surprize, 1790. life, Protestant, settler, Kissing Point Porter, Mary, 62, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, 7 years, Protestant Porter, Richard (Jun), 23, born in the colony

Death January 20, 1850 (aged 84 years)
Burial
Cemetery: St Anne's Cemetery
Text:

Both Richard and Mary were buried at St Anne's Cemetery Ryde, where a heastone survives.

Family with parents
father
mother
17371805
Birth: about 1737
Death:
Marriage
Marriage: United Kingdom
herself
17651850
Birth: May 23, 1765 28Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: January 20, 1850Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Mother’s family with Richard Porter
husband
17651849
Birth: about 1765Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 20, 1849Pennant Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
mother
17371805
Birth: about 1737
Death:
Marriage
Marriage: October 8, 1797Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Family with James Weavers
husband
17521805
Birth: about 1752
Death: April 3, 1805Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
herself
17651850
Birth: May 23, 1765 28Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: January 20, 1850Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1792Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
14 months
son
17931793
Birth: March 10, 1793 41 27Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1793Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
15 months
son
17941816
Birth: June 1, 1794 42 29Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 13, 1816Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
17961828
Birth: July 30, 1796 44 31Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 16, 1828New South Wales, Australia
5 years
daughter
18001872
Birth: 1800 48 34Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1872Ryde, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Richard Porter
husband
17651849
Birth: about 1765Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 20, 1849Pennant Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
herself
17651850
Birth: May 23, 1765 28Holborn, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: January 20, 1850Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: June 8, 1811Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-5 years
son
18061889
Birth: June 22, 1806 41 41Ryde, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: July 15, 1889Gordon, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
0 months
son
1806
Birth: June 22, 1806 41 41Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
20 months
son
1808
Birth: February 9, 1808 43 42Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
21 months
daughter
18091839
Birth: November 3, 1809 44 44Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: October 25, 1839Brickfield Hill, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18121891
Birth: May 16, 1812 47 46Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1891Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
13 months
son
1813
Birth: May 26, 1813 48 48Kissing Point, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
Richard Porter + Ann
husband
17651849
Birth: about 1765Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 20, 1849Pennant Hills, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
mother
17371805
Birth: about 1737
Death:
Marriage
Marriage: October 8, 1797Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
ImmigrationUniversity of Sheffield. Humanities Research Institute. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. [database on-line]. Sheffield: the Institute, 2003-2008
Text:

ANN HUTCHINSON and MARY HUTCHINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December one cotton gown, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a pair of ruffles, value 12 d. two aprons, value 10 s. two ditto, value 3 s. a night cap, value 6 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. a linen pocket, value 12 d. and 11 s. in monies numbered, the property of Ann Body, in the dwelling-house of Ann Hutchinson . ANN BODY sworn. I lived last at Chelsea. I am a housekeeper. I was at Ann Hutchinson 's house in Cross-lane, Saint Giles's, at nine in the evening, to lodge there; I do not know how I came there; I met the prisoner in Holborn, and she took me to her house. I lost a cotton gown, value twelve shillings, a black silk cloak, value five shillings, four neck handkerchiefs, value three shillings, a pair of worked muslin ruffles, value two shillings, two muslin aprons, one value twelve shillings, the other, value nine shillings, two linen aprons, value four shillings, two pocket handkerchiefs, value sixteen-pence, a night cap, value four-pence, two pair of cotton stockings, value four shillings, a linen pocket, value ten-pence, and the money I am positive to is eleven shillings; I lost them at the place where Ann Hutchinson lived: I saw the daughter. I was going to my lodgings in Henrietta-street, in Oxford-street: I met Ann Hutchinson in Holborn, and she accosted me; why you are frightened? no, says I, I am not frightened, but I wish I could get a lodging nearer than where I am; she said, I should be welcome to her house; and sent her young child to Scotch Court, Cross-lane, Saint Giles's; when I got there I undressed myself and went to bed, and placed my things in a chair by the bed side; about nine, after I had been asleep two or three hours, I heard a great noise; I saw both the prisoners come into the room; her daughter came to the bed side and asked her mother what business she had to take in any body to lodge there; the mother desired her to make no noise for she should pay well for sleeping here: the daughter came to the bed side, and said, I should not lay any longer, and said it was the custom of that house, that whoever lay there should pay two shillings for gin, and she took my pockets from me, and insisted on having the contents, and she took from my pocket eleven shillings and some halfpence; she then brought the glass and the gin, and insisted I should drink; I would not, but she made me drink it because I was afraid of her; then she forced me by holding my shoulder and made me drink a second glass, which intoxicated me; then she took my bundle away and returned again in a few minutes without the bundle, and then told me to go about my business; the old prisoner was much in liquor; she was present. I asked her for my bundle; she swore I never brought any bundle there; she then gave the candle to her younger sister to light me down; she would not; then the prisoner took the candle and lighted me down: I said I would not go without my money and bundle; then she said, if I would not by fair means I should by foul means; she took me by the two shoulders and shoved me out of the room, and from thence out of the house; I asked the daughter to shew me into Holborn; she would not. I met two watchmen, and told them I had been robbed; they told me I was a woman of the town, and said I was a dirty hussey, and if I did not go about my business he would take me to the watch-house; I then met another watchman, I told him; he went with me to the house, but we could not find any thing of mine; then I saw Mr. Treadway, who searched the room, and found a cap, a black cloak, two handkerchiefs, and a cotton stocking. EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. I am a constable. On Saturday night last between two and three o'clock the watchman brought in the two prisoners; I went and searched with a candle, and broke open the door, and under a fish basket I found a black cloak in the ashes, this handkerchief under the bed, this cap and apron, this handkerchief in another corner of the room; I found nothing else. The prosecutrix was in liquor: she said the prisoners forced her to drink gin. (The things produced and deposed to, the handkerchief marked A. G. the stockings marked with an A.) How came the handkerchief to be marked A. G.? - Because I changed a handkerchief I had with a fellow servant at Chelsea, whose name was Ann Green. Prisoners. We are innocent; we have no witnesses. ANN HUTCHINSON, MARY HUTCHINSON, GUILTY, 39 s. Transported for seven years. The Court ordered Treadway a liberal allowance for his expences. Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Text:

Ann Hutchinson, one of 106 convicts transported on the ship Mary Ann January 1791. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of 7 years. Vessel: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary. Date of Departure: January 1791. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

MarriageFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993
MarriageFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993
Text:

From about 1805, Richard lived with Mary Hutchinson (b. abt 1765), and they were married on 8 Jun 1811 at St Philips Sydney.

CensusCensus of New South Wales November 1828, ed. by Malcolm R. Sainty and Keith A. Johnson. Sydney: Library of Australian History, 1985 ie. 1980
Citation details:

p. 304

Text:

Porter, Richard, 62, absolute pardon, Surprize, 1790. life, Protestant, settler, Kissing Point Porter, Mary, 62, free by servitude, Mary Ann, 1791, 7 years, Protestant Porter, Richard (Jun), 23, born in the colony

BurialFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993
Text:

Both Richard and Mary were buried at St Anne's Cemetery Ryde, where a heastone survives.