Anna Josepha Coombe, 17651844 (aged 79 years)

Coombe, Anna Josepha (1765-1844)
Name
Anna Josepha Coombe
Given names
Anna Josepha
Surname
Coombe
Married name
Anna Josepha King
Birth 1765
MarriagePhilip Gidley KingView this family
March 11, 1791 (aged 26 years)
Birth of a son
#1
Phillip Parker King
December 13, 1791 (aged 26 years)
Residence after 1791 (aged 26 years)
Text:

Wihtin a few days of their marriage, the couple sailed for Norfolk Island where King had been appointed Lieutenant Governor.

Six weeks after landing at Norfolk Island, her son Phillip Parker was born and in the next four years she had two daughters, one of whom died young. Before her own son was born, she cared for Norfolk King, the elder of her husband's two illegitimate sons born during his earlier term on the island.

During King's absence in England, both boys had probably been in Sydney with their mother, but in 1791 Norfolk returned to the island with his father. Later, both boys were sent to England, where King ahd them educated, and where as children they, Phillip, Maria and another daughter Elizabeth, although under different roofs, played together when they met and sent each other their 'kind love' when apart.

In 1796 they returned to England because of King's ill health and sailed back again when King was appointed Governor of NSW. Only their youngest child, Elizabeth, sailed with them; Phillip and Maria, for their supposed educational advantage, were left behind, Maria with friends, the Enderbys of whaling fame, and Phillip with a tutor who was to let the parents have news of him twice a year.

Birth of a daughter
#2
Anna Maria King
April 23, 1793 (aged 28 years)
Birth of a daughter
#3
Utricia King
1795 (aged 30 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Elizabeth King
February 10, 1797 (aged 32 years)
Text:

On board the ship 'Contractor'

Death of a daughterUtricia King
about 1798 (aged 33 years)
Residence 1800 (aged 35 years)
Text:

In Sydney Mrs King found her husband and therefore herself on a stage much larger than that of Norfolk Island and presenting a more complex and important drama, involving a larger cast. She fully shared her husband's anxieties and labours; indeed, the influence she was thought to have over him earned her the nickname of 'Queen Josepha'. But one activity, strongly supported by the governor, was her own plan to mitigate the depravity of the Sydney scene by helping the hordes of neglected children that roamed its streets. The segregation and training of numbers of girl-waifs in what became known as Mrs King's Orphanage was the object of her daily attention and that of Mrs Paterson, her friend from Norfolk Island days and her friend again in Sydney whenever the quarrels of King and the military allowed.

Birth of a daughter
#5
Mary King
February 1, 1805 (aged 40 years)
Address: 'Government House'
Death of a husbandPhilip Gidley King
September 3, 1808 (aged 43 years)
Text:

King left for England aboard the ship 'Buffalo' in Feb 1807 and died on 3 Sep 1808 and was buried at Tooting, London.

Marriage of a childHannibal Hawkins MacarthurAnna Maria KingView this family
February 13, 1812 (aged 47 years)
Text:

Name: Hannibal Hawkins Mc Arthur Gender: Male Marriage Date: 13 Feb 1812 Marriage Place: Saint Mary-St Marylebone Road,St Marylebone,London,England Spouse: Anna Maria King FHL Film Number: 942 B4HA V. 51, 942 B4HA V. 52, 942 B4HA V. 54, 942 B4HA V. 55, 942 B4HA V. 56, 942 B4HA V. 57

Marriage of a childPhillip Parker KingHarriet LethbridgeView this family
January 29, 1817 (aged 52 years)
Marriage of a childRobert Copland LethbridgeMary KingView this family
July 25, 1826 (aged 61 years)
Death July 26, 1844 (aged 79 years)
Text:

In 1806 King, defeated by gout and opposition, was relieved by Captain William Bligh, and in a second sea-journal Mrs King described their nightmare nine-month voyage to England next year. King died in September 1808, leaving his wife and family in real need. The Treasury's meagre help was long in coming to his widow; but after a time she began to get financial relief from two sources in New South Wales: from cattle and from the land on which the cattle grazed, though her title to the first was vague and to the second illegal. The cattle were the flourishing descendants of a few beasts lost in the settlement's early days; two cows among them had belonged to Governor Arthur Phillip, who in 1801 remitted to King his claim on their progeny; her land was a grant of 790 acres (320 ha) made to her by Bligh in return for one, also illegal, made to Bligh by King. The ownership of Bligh's heiresses was challenged and their case was not settled until 1841; but Mrs King seems to have been left in undisturbed enjoyment of her grant at South Creek and the profits from both land and what Governor Lachlan Macquarie described in 1810 as 'her fine numerous herds of horned cattle, of which she has upwards of 700 Head of all descriptions'.

Mrs King spent nearly twenty-four almost undocumented years in England before she was able to return, as she had long wished, to the colony where she had passed the most important part of her life. Two of her three daughters were settled there, Maria, wife of Hannibal Macarthur and Mary (b.1805), wife of Robert Lethbridge; her distinguished son, Captain P. P. King, was about to settle there too. She sailed with him for Sydney in 1832 and on arrival was found by Elizabeth Macarthur 'as gay as ever' and 'very little changed'. At The Vineyard, Parramatta, the home of her daughter Maria, she was a valued part of an active family life until she died there on 26 July 1844. A stalwart member of the Church of England, she was buried in the graveyard of St Mary's, Penrith, formerly South Creek.

Burial
Cemetery: St Marys Churchyard
Family with Philip Gidley King
husband
17581808
Birth: April 23, 1758Launceston, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 3, 1808London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
herself
Coombe, Anna Josepha (1765-1844)
17651844
Birth: 1765Hatherleigh, Devon, England, United Kingdom
Death: July 26, 1844Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: March 11, 1791Bideford, Devon, England, United Kingdom
9 months
son
King, Phillip Parker (1791-1856)
17911856
Birth: December 13, 1791 33 26Norfolk Island, New South Wales, Australia
Death: February 26, 1856Ashfield, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
17 months
daughter
King, Anna Maria (1793-1852)
17931852
Birth: April 23, 1793 35 28Norfolk Island
Death: September 1, 1852Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
3 years
daughter
17951798
Birth: 1795 36 30Norfolk Island
Death: about 1798England, United Kingdom
2 years
daughter
8 years
daughter
18051872
Birth: February 1, 1805 46 40Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 17, 1872
Philip Gidley King + Ann Inett
husband
17581808
Birth: April 23, 1758Launceston, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 3, 1808London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
partner’s partner
17571820
Birth: about 1757
Death: after March 1820
Marriage
Marriage: about April 1788Norfolk Island, New South Wales, Australia
9 months
step-son
17891839
Birth: January 8, 1789 30 32Norfolk Island, New South Wales, Australia
Death: about 1839
18 months
step-son
17901840
Birth: July 9, 1790 32 33Sydney Town, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: about 1840
BirthAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
MarriageFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993
ResidenceAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

Wihtin a few days of their marriage, the couple sailed for Norfolk Island where King had been appointed Lieutenant Governor.

Six weeks after landing at Norfolk Island, her son Phillip Parker was born and in the next four years she had two daughters, one of whom died young. Before her own son was born, she cared for Norfolk King, the elder of her husband's two illegitimate sons born during his earlier term on the island.

During King's absence in England, both boys had probably been in Sydney with their mother, but in 1791 Norfolk returned to the island with his father. Later, both boys were sent to England, where King ahd them educated, and where as children they, Phillip, Maria and another daughter Elizabeth, although under different roofs, played together when they met and sent each other their 'kind love' when apart.

In 1796 they returned to England because of King's ill health and sailed back again when King was appointed Governor of NSW. Only their youngest child, Elizabeth, sailed with them; Phillip and Maria, for their supposed educational advantage, were left behind, Maria with friends, the Enderbys of whaling fame, and Phillip with a tutor who was to let the parents have news of him twice a year.

ResidenceAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
Text:

In Sydney Mrs King found her husband and therefore herself on a stage much larger than that of Norfolk Island and presenting a more complex and important drama, involving a larger cast. She fully shared her husband's anxieties and labours; indeed, the influence she was thought to have over him earned her the nickname of 'Queen Josepha'. But one activity, strongly supported by the governor, was her own plan to mitigate the depravity of the Sydney scene by helping the hordes of neglected children that roamed its streets. The segregation and training of numbers of girl-waifs in what became known as Mrs King's Orphanage was the object of her daily attention and that of Mrs Paterson, her friend from Norfolk Island days and her friend again in Sydney whenever the quarrels of King and the military allowed.

DeathFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993
Text:

In 1806 King, defeated by gout and opposition, was relieved by Captain William Bligh, and in a second sea-journal Mrs King described their nightmare nine-month voyage to England next year. King died in September 1808, leaving his wife and family in real need. The Treasury's meagre help was long in coming to his widow; but after a time she began to get financial relief from two sources in New South Wales: from cattle and from the land on which the cattle grazed, though her title to the first was vague and to the second illegal. The cattle were the flourishing descendants of a few beasts lost in the settlement's early days; two cows among them had belonged to Governor Arthur Phillip, who in 1801 remitted to King his claim on their progeny; her land was a grant of 790 acres (320 ha) made to her by Bligh in return for one, also illegal, made to Bligh by King. The ownership of Bligh's heiresses was challenged and their case was not settled until 1841; but Mrs King seems to have been left in undisturbed enjoyment of her grant at South Creek and the profits from both land and what Governor Lachlan Macquarie described in 1810 as 'her fine numerous herds of horned cattle, of which she has upwards of 700 Head of all descriptions'.

Mrs King spent nearly twenty-four almost undocumented years in England before she was able to return, as she had long wished, to the colony where she had passed the most important part of her life. Two of her three daughters were settled there, Maria, wife of Hannibal Macarthur and Mary (b.1805), wife of Robert Lethbridge; her distinguished son, Captain P. P. King, was about to settle there too. She sailed with him for Sydney in 1832 and on arrival was found by Elizabeth Macarthur 'as gay as ever' and 'very little changed'. At The Vineyard, Parramatta, the home of her daughter Maria, she was a valued part of an active family life until she died there on 26 July 1844. A stalwart member of the Church of England, she was buried in the graveyard of St Mary's, Penrith, formerly South Creek.

BurialFlynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain's grim convict armada of 1790. Sydney : Library of Australian History, 1993