Henry Marsh, 17981825 (aged 26 years)

Name
Henry /Marsh/
Given names
Henry
Surname
Marsh
Birth before October 1798 28

Immigration July 16, 1799 (aged 9 months)
Text:

Henry's mother Rosetta had come free to the colony in 1799 in the disease-ridden 'Hillsborough'. His probably father, Henry Marsh had also been aboard as a convict. The convicts were picked up from various prison hulks, one of which was infected with gaol fever (typhus). Soon after the ship departed Langstone Harbour near Portsmouth, disease broke out. The decks required caulking and when it rained shortly after departure the convict quarters became soaked. The captain was told that many of the convicts were out of their irons and intending to murder the officers. Those found out of their irons were flogged, receiving from one to six dozen lashes each, and were shackled and handcuffed, some with iron collars around their neck. Their allowance of rations and water were also reduced. Even after the disease spread throughout the convicts and deaths became alarmingly frequent, they were kept closely confined and double-ironed, were short of water and were half starved. One third of the 300 convicts died on the voyage, and several others died shortly after their arrival at Sydney. Governor John Hunter, when the 'Hillsborough' reached Sydney, described the survivors as 'the most wretched and miserable convicts I have ever beheld, in the most sickly and wretched state'. The resultant scandal led to the 'Hillsborough' being called the 'Death Ship'.

Death 1825 (aged 26 years)
Text:

Henry junior worked on ships sailing out of Sydney and rose to the rank of captain. At the time of his death in 1825 he was employed by the East India Company. He died unmarried in Rangoon, aged about 28.

Family with parents
father
mother
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
1 month
himself
17981825
Birth: before October 1798 28
Death: 1825Rangoon, Burma
19 months
younger sister
18001873
Birth: April 28, 1800 29New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1873
Mother’s family with Edward Madden
step-father
1799
Birth: United Kingdom
Death: 1799The high Seas
mother
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: before October 1798
Mother’s family with Samuel Terry
step-father
17771838
Birth: about 1777
Death: February 22, 1838
mother
17701858
Birth: July 29, 1770 26Finsbury, London, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 5, 1858
Marriage
Marriage: March 27, 1810
-3 years
half-brother
18061842
Birth: about 1806 29 35
Death: 1842New South Wales, Australia
4 years
half-brother
18101838
Birth: April 26, 1810 33 39Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 28, 1838Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
18 months
half-sister
18111877
Birth: October 31, 1811 34 41Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 30, 1877Penrith, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
ImmigrationAustralian Dictionary of Biography. Online edition. [database - on-line]. Canberra: Australian National University, 2006
ImmigrationPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

Henry's mother Rosetta had come free to the colony in 1799 in the disease-ridden 'Hillsborough'. His probably father, Henry Marsh had also been aboard as a convict. The convicts were picked up from various prison hulks, one of which was infected with gaol fever (typhus). Soon after the ship departed Langstone Harbour near Portsmouth, disease broke out. The decks required caulking and when it rained shortly after departure the convict quarters became soaked. The captain was told that many of the convicts were out of their irons and intending to murder the officers. Those found out of their irons were flogged, receiving from one to six dozen lashes each, and were shackled and handcuffed, some with iron collars around their neck. Their allowance of rations and water were also reduced. Even after the disease spread throughout the convicts and deaths became alarmingly frequent, they were kept closely confined and double-ironed, were short of water and were half starved. One third of the 300 convicts died on the voyage, and several others died shortly after their arrival at Sydney. Governor John Hunter, when the 'Hillsborough' reached Sydney, described the survivors as 'the most wretched and miserable convicts I have ever beheld, in the most sickly and wretched state'. The resultant scandal led to the 'Hillsborough' being called the 'Death Ship'.

DeathPracy, David. Rosetta Terry nee Rosey Pracey (1770-1858) [paper submitted to] the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies Biography of an Ancestor Competition. [published online]. Jan 2007.
Text:

Henry junior worked on ships sailing out of Sydney and rose to the rank of captain. At the time of his death in 1825 he was employed by the East India Company. He died unmarried in Rangoon, aged about 28.