Henry Sutton, 18011886 (aged 85 years)

Name
Henry Sutton
Given names
Henry
Surname
Sutton
Birth between 1801 and 1806
Text:

Parents Thomas and Sarah

Immigration November 3, 1828 (aged 27 years)
Text:

Henry Sutton, one of 192 convicts transported on the ship 'Albion', 29 May 1828. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of life on 10 January 1828. Vessel: Albion. Date of Departure: 29 May 1828. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Text:

10 Jan 1828: HENRY SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of November, at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Clements, 1 watch, value 15/-; 1 pair of gold snaps, value 18/-; 3 bracelets, value 3/-; 12 silver forks, value 9/-; 15 silver spoons, value 9/-; 1 pelisse, value 20/-; 3 dresses, value 12/-; 16 pairs of silk stockings, value 6/-; and 11 shifts, value 6/-, her property.

MARY ANN CLEMENTS. My real name is Clements, but I have assumed the name of Kelly for about five years. I live at No. 2, Bath-place, New-road, Mary-le-bone, in the parish of St. Pancras - my tax papers are headed St. Pancras; nobody but myself rents the house. On the 31st of October I went out, and did not sleep at home that night; I slept at No. 16, Duke-street, Portland-place. I had left my house about five o'clock in the evening - every thing was perfectly safe when I went out; I went to my house next day, at one o'clock; I called for some cloaks, but did not go into the house - I remained at the gate. I called again at half-past three - I merely went for some clothes of my own and of the lady's with whom I was with in Duke-street; I did not go into the house - Aldridge, my servant, delivered them to me; I dined out. A friend came to me at No. 16, Duke-street, to tell me my house was robbed - I went there a few minutes after five o'clock, and found four or five officers in the dining-room; I found my wardrobe stripped, and the plate out of the dining-room gone; my wardrobe had not been locked - there was nothing left in it but an old pair of stockings; and some white dresses were left in a drawer. I missed a gold watch, worth 15l.; a pair of gold bracelets, worth eighteen guineas, four silk dresses, worth 16l.; a velvet pelisse, worth 21l.; twelve or thirteen shifts and about sixteen pairs of silk stockings; I also missed six silver dinner forks, which cost 21s. each; six desert forks; and eight table-spoons, worth 5l. or 6l. from the sideboard cupboard, in the dining-room; I had left the keys with my servant, and desired her to lock it - it was all my property. Some places had been unlocked, but not forced open. I suppose the property to be worth 130l. or 140l. altogether. but cannot be certain of the exact value. I did not tell the Magistrate that my wardrobe was forced - (looking at her deposition) I signed this - it says so here, but I never said it - it must be a mistake.

MARY ANN GREEN. On a Wednesday evening, late in October, I went to Burchett's lodgings; I do not know the day, or whether it was in October or November - I saw Isabella Aldridge there - she is Mrs. Kelly's servant; I knew her by that name: I went home with her to her mistress' house, and staid there all night, and in the morning went with her to Tottenham Court-road, to buy some gall to clean the parlour carpet - this was on Thursday morning - we both returned to the house, and a person sent to say she wished to speak to Aldridge; she went out, leaving me in the house; and about half-past twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner in the New-road - I was then with Aldridge - she asked him to come into the house, and he went in; Aldridge told him she was going to have a treat, a preserved damson pudding for her dinner - he said he was very fond of that: she told him she was going to meet her mistress in the afternoon, and could not stay to eat any of it, but if he would call in the course of the afternoon he should have some; the prisoner left the house, after eating a herring and a roll. Aldridge then went out, and I was left alone in the house - the prisoner came again in about half an hour; it was then about half-past two o'clock, I think; he knocked at the door, and I let him in; he came down to the kitchen; I told him the pudding was not done; he stood in the kitchen, looked round, and asked me if I could not get him a silver spoon - I asked him what for; he said to pledge for a trifle of money, for he was very much distressed; I asked where he thought I could get a silver spoon from, and said he would get me into disgrace, and the servant too; he then went up stairs: I went up with him, to let him out at the street door; as he went along the passage the parlour door was open - he went into the parlour, looked on the sideboard and about; I begged of him not to touch any thing that was there; the sideboard cupboard door stood a little open, and he took out a basket of plate: I begged of him not to do any thing of the kind; I saw him take the basket out, and saw there was silver in it, but do not know what kind of plate it was; he told me to keep all silent, and it would be all for the best; he told me to remain in the passage, and that if any one came not to open the door, and said he would have a good sweep; he went up stairs, and came down in about five minutes afterwards, with two bundles, and went out of the house. I never saw him any more till he came to the prison; when he went out he told me when the servant came in, to clap my hands together, and say, "Oh! Bella, I am sure there are thieves in the house, for there is such a noise up stairs;" the servant came in in about ten minutes after he went out, and directly after she came in the prisoner came up, and knocked at the door; the servant was very much frightened, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped.

Q. Had you told her what he mentioned when she came in? A. Yes; I said, "Oh! Bella, there is such a noise up stairs - I am sure there are thieves in the house." She went up stairs directly.

Q. Did she come down before be came to the door? A. No; he knocked at the door directly she came in - she came down directly, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped; he told her to keep all silent, and to go for an officer; she went, and one came - she asked him where to go for an officer - he told her to go to Benson's butter-shop, at the corner of the New-road; she went, and the prisoner went away before the officer came; I never saw him again till he came to Clerkenwell prison, where I was taken on suspicion of being concerned in this. When I saw him there he begged of me to keep my own counsel. I have known the prisoner ten years - he was a shoemaker. I used to go out to work, as I could get it, but have no regular place of service.

Q. Had the prisoner employment at this time? A. Yes- I used to see him every day; I cannot mention the date on which this happened, but I remember Mrs. Kelly coming in a chaise about two o'clock on the Thursday - the prisoner was in the house at that time; Mrs. Kelly did not come in: the prisoner was in the kitchen, and went to hide himself, because she should not see him, and I went with him, as I did not wish to be seen - I do not know what Mrs. Kelly came for - she did not come again till after the robbery, to my knowledge; I do not know of any dress being taken to her.

Q. What did the prisoner do with the basket of plate? A. He put it into his pockets, I believe; he carried two bundles out, but I did not see what was in them.

ISABELLA ALDRIDGE. I was servant to Mrs. Kelly in October last; I remember seeing Green at Burchett's lodgings; I think it was on the last day of October - she went home, and slept with me that night; Mrs. Kelly did not sleep at home that night - it was on the Wednesday that she went out. I have known the prisoner about a twelvemonth - I did not see him on the Thursday till two o'clock; I saw him then in the New-road - Green called him, and asked him to come in - he came into Mrs. Kelly's house; he came down stairs; I had got some damsons, and told him I was going to have a damson pudding for dinner- he said it was what he was very fond of, and he should like some; I said if he could stop he might have some - he said he could not stop; I asked if he could come in the afternoon - he said No, he had got some work to do, and could not leave work till about eight o'clock in the evening- he had a herring, and part of a roll which was left at breakfast - he ate that, and then went out; I did not see him again till after the robbery: I had gone out to No. 16, Duke-street, where my mistress was, about half an hour after he left - I was to have taken her a dress and a pair of shoes - I forgot to take the shoes; she sent me home for them, and when I got there Green said she heard a noise in the house, and that I had left the door open.

Q. Well, but did your mistress come to the house in a gig? A. Yes; she came to the house about one o'clock, and about three; both times were before the robbery; I first heard of the robbery when I came home for the shoes, that was about five o'clock; I opened the door with a key, and called Green; she came up stairs from the kitchen, after I had called three times, and told me she had heard a dreadful noise in the house - that I had left the street door open, and she thought some one was in the house then. I had not left the door open.

Q. Did you go up stairs? A. Yes, and found the wardrobe almost stripped of all the clothes; I came down again, and when I came down the prisoner was at the door.

Q. Did you look at the sideboard? A. No - I did not go into the parlour. I told him the wardrobe was stripped, and asked him what I should do; he told me to go and fetch an officer; I asked him where - he told me to go to the butter-shop at the corner of the New-road; I went, and they told me where to go and get one; Benson keeps the butter-shop - he did not mention Benson's name; I was to ask them where there was an officer. I left the prisoner in the house; he told me he would stop till I came back, but he went away while I was gone; he told me to keep all quiet, and not to say that he had been to the house; I said No, I would not - I hoped God would strike me dead if I did, if he would stop till I got back, and he said he would.

Q. How came you to say you would not tell any body? A. Because he did not seem satisfied that I would not say he had been. and I thought if I said that he would stop till I came back, and if I did not say so he might go away; Green was by my side, and told me not to say she had been in the house; I said I wished her to stop with me, and she did stop.

GEORGE AVIS. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of November, at Clerkenwell prison; he came there to see Mary Ann Green - he said his name was Williams - I told him I knew it was Sutton, and he must come with me. As I took him to the office I told him I took him on suspicion of Mrs. Kelly's robbery - he said he was innocent - that he knew nothing of it, and was never in the house in his life, no farther than walking to and fro. I took him before Sir George Farrant - at his first examination he denied it, the same as he had to me; what he said was not then taken down: he was brought up a second time - I had no conversation with him; no threat nor promise was held out to him by any body; what he said was in the presence of the Magistrate, who took it down; it was read over to him, and he signed it; Sir George Farrant also signed it, and I witnessed it; I saw him sign his name - this is his statement (looking at it,) and this is Sir George Farrant's signature to it - here is my signature - the prisoner made no objection to signing it; (read) "I now acknowledge that I did take the property, as mentioned by Green, and gave the two bundles to a man named William Smith, who waited for them near Mrs. Kelly's house, but I never saw Smith afterwards, nor received any of the money the things might produce, - Henry Sutton."

MRS. CLEMENTS. I have not found any of my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Thursday that the robbery was committed I was to have met Green at two o'clock, to give her part of my earnings, to help maintain her; when I got to the bottom of Brook-street she told me to come that way - I was not inclined to go, but the servant beckoned to me to come in; I objected - I was asked to come in several times - I at last went in, and took part of a herring and roll; I then said I must go, as I had been ill for two months, and should lose my work if I did not attend to it; I went to the corner of the New-road. I had a subscription made for me while I was ill, and Smith had subscribed for me; I met him, and asked him to go and take part of a pint of porter - we went to a public-house, and had a pint of beer, and afterwards sixpenny-worth of rum; he asked how the young woman was who nursed me when I was ill- I told him she was at the prosecutrix's house, and I was to have something to eat there, and what money I had I would spend on him, for his kindness - I stopped there with him for half an hour, and in our conversation he said I was to blame if I did not get some property from the house, and could I not do it - I said No, but after awhile he overpowered me; I went in, and brought the property.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing him to have been induced to commit the offence by Smith.

MarriageAnn LiddyView this family
1833 (aged 32 years)
Text:

Name: Henry Sutton Spouse Name: Ann Liday Marriage Date: 1833 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Parramatta, New South Wales Registration Year: 1833 Volume Number: V

Text:

Name: Henry Sutton Gender: Male Age: 27 Birth Year: abt 1806 Marriage Date: 28 Sep 1833 Marriage Place: Parramatta, Cumberland, New South Wales, Australia Spouse: Ann Liddy Spouse Age: 18

Birth of a son
#1
William Sutton
October 24, 1834 (aged 33 years)
Text:

Born 24 Oct 1834 and baptised 30 Nov 1834 William son of Henry and Anne Sutton of Parramatta, assigned to Mr. McArthur R. Forrest officiating minister

Birth of a son
#2
Alfred Sutton
July 21, 1836 (aged 35 years)
Text:

Born 21 Jul 1836 and baptised 28 Aug 1836 Alfred son of Henry and Anne Sutton a shoe maker of Parramatta R. Forrest officiating minister

Birth of a daughter
#3
Emma Sutton
May 15, 1838 (aged 37 years)
Text:

Born 15 May 1838 and baptised 10 Jun 1838 Emma daughter of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Parramatta Henry H. Bobart curate

Birth of a son
#4
Henry Darlow Sutton
January 6, 1841 (aged 40 years)
Text:

V1841869 25A/1841 SUTTON HENRY D HENRY ANN

Text:

Born 6 Jan 1841 and baptised 2 May 1841 Henry Darlow son of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Parramatta Wm West Simpson officiating minister

Birth of a daughter
#5
Mary Ann Sutton
September 3, 1843 (aged 42 years)
Text:

Born 3 Sep 1843 and baptised 5 Nov 1843 Mary Ann daughter of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Parramatta H.H. Bobart officiating minister

Birth of a daughter
#6
Selina Sutton
June 11, 1846 (aged 45 years)
Text:

Name Selina Sutton Birth Date 1846 Birth Place New South Wales Registration Year 1846 Registration Place Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Father Henry Sutton Mother Ann Volume Number V18461089 31A

Text:

Born 11 Jun 1846 and baptised 23 Aug 1846 Selina daughter of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Parramatta H.H. Bobart officiating minister

Birth of a son
#7
Thomas Sutton
December 16, 1848 (aged 47 years)
Text:

Name: Thomas Sutton Gender: Male Baptism Age: 0 Birth Date: 16 Dec 1848 Birth Place: New South Wales, Australia Baptism Date: 25 Feb 1849 Baptism Place: St. John, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Residence Date: 1848 Residence Place: New South Wales, Australia Father: Henry Sutton Mother: Ann FHL Film Number: 993935

Birth of a daughter
#8
Matilda Jane Sutton
September 13, 1851 (aged 50 years)
Text:

Name Matilda J Sutton Birth Date 1851 Birth Place New South Wales Registration Year 1851 Registration Place Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Father Henry Sutton Mother Ann Volume Number V18511282 37A

Text:

Born 13 Sep 1851 and baptised 14 Dec 1851 Matilda Jane daughter of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Church Street

Birth of a son
#9
John Sutton
September 2, 1854 (aged 53 years)
Text:

Name John Sutton Birth Date 1854 Birth Place New South Wales Registration Year 1854 Registration Place Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Father Henry Sutton Mother Ann Volume Number V18542243 40

Text:

Born 2 Sep 1854 and baptised 22 Oct 1854 John son of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoe maker of Church Street

Marriage of a childWilliam SuttonMary Ann PowellView this family
October 14, 1856 (aged 55 years)
Citation details:

Marriage certificate number 01841

Text:

Married at Parramatta Scots Church, Presbyterian, William Sutton, bachelor and butcher, residence Phillip Street Parramatta and Mary Ann Powell, spinster of Parramatta. Witnesses were Mary Rafter and James Bridges. Minister was James Coutes

Birth of a son
#10
Albert David Sutton
November 4, 1856 (aged 55 years)
Text:

Name: Albert D Sutton Birth Date: 1856 Birth Place: New South Wales Registration Year: 1856 Registration Place: Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Father: Henry Sutton Mother: Ann Registration Number: 6829

Text:

Born 4 Nov 1856 and baptised 7 Dec 1856 Albert David son of Henry and Ann Sutton a shoemaker of Church Street

Birth of a son
#11
Pearce Nathaniel Sutton
1859 (aged 58 years)
Text:

Name Pierce N Sutton Birth Date 1859 Birth Place New South Wales Registration Year 1859 Registration Place Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Father Henry Sutton Mother Ann Registration Number 10832

Marriage of a childWilliam Powell MiddletonEmma SuttonView this family
1860 (aged 59 years)
Text:

Name: William Powell Middleton Spouse Name: Emma Sutton Marriage Date: 1860 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Maitland, New South Wales Registration Year: 1860 Registration Number: 1998

Marriage of a childHenry Darlow SuttonSarah Ann FarranceView this family
1862 (aged 61 years)
Text:

2643/1862 SUTTON HENRY DARLOW LEE SARAH ANN PARRAMATTA

Marriage of a childWilliam SuttonAnn MillsView this family
about 1863 (aged 62 years)
Text:

...there was no marriage date recorded of William Sutton and Ann Tuxford, hence, some of the children's birth certificates show the childrens surname as Mills,Tuxford, Sutton, and even one without a surname at all.

Text:

It is known that Ann Mills went to live with William Sutton after the death of her husband William Tuxford, who was reportedly kicked in the head by his horse. We have reason to believe the horse was spooked and that William and Ann may have been seeing each other secretly before William's death as his death was under suspicious circumstances.

Marriage of a childThomas SuttonEmelia SheppeardView this family
1871 (aged 70 years)
Text:

Name: Thomas Sutton Spouse Name: Amelia Sheppeard Marriage Date: 1871 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Hartley, New South Wales Registration Year: 1871 Registration Number: 2434

Marriage of a childAlbert David SuttonEmily BennettView this family
1877 (aged 76 years)
Text:

Name Emily Bennett Spouse Name Albert David Sutton Marriage Date 1877 Marriage Place New South Wales Registration Place Parramatta New South Wales Registration Year 1877 Registration Number 4025

Death December 23, 1886 (aged 85 years)
Address: 'Redfernville' 116 Missenden Road
Burial December 25, 1886 (2 days after death)
Cemetery: Old Anglican section
Family with Ann Liddy
himself
18011886
Birth: between 1801 and 1806London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: December 23, 1886Camperdown, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
wife
18151891
Birth: about 1815
Death: 1891Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1833Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
22 months
son
18341890
Birth: October 24, 1834 33 19Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 21, 1890Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
21 months
son
1836
Birth: July 21, 1836 35 21Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death:
22 months
daughter
18381919
Birth: May 15, 1838 37 23Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 1, 1919Granville, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
Sutton, Henry Darlow (1841-1913)
18411913
Birth: January 6, 1841 40 26Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 11, 1913Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18431919
Birth: September 3, 1843 42 28Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1919Canterbury, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18461906
Birth: June 11, 1846 45 31Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1906Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18481940
Birth: December 16, 1848 47 33Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: December 12, 1940Bowenfels, Central Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18511938
Birth: September 13, 1851 50 36Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1938Auburn, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18541910
Birth: September 2, 1854 53 39Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1910Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
18561908
Birth: November 4, 1856 55 41Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: June 18, 1908Leichhardt, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18591949
Birth: 1859 58 44Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1949Auburn, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
BirthTuxford, Bob, [various titles] email messages to Marion Purnell, Sep 2010
Text:

Parents Thomas and Sarah

ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Text:

Henry Sutton, one of 192 convicts transported on the ship 'Albion', 29 May 1828. Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of life on 10 January 1828. Vessel: Albion. Date of Departure: 29 May 1828. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

ImmigrationUniversity of Sheffield. Humanities Research Institute. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. [database on-line]. Sheffield: the Institute, 2003-2008
Text:

10 Jan 1828: HENRY SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of November, at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Clements, 1 watch, value 15/-; 1 pair of gold snaps, value 18/-; 3 bracelets, value 3/-; 12 silver forks, value 9/-; 15 silver spoons, value 9/-; 1 pelisse, value 20/-; 3 dresses, value 12/-; 16 pairs of silk stockings, value 6/-; and 11 shifts, value 6/-, her property.

MARY ANN CLEMENTS. My real name is Clements, but I have assumed the name of Kelly for about five years. I live at No. 2, Bath-place, New-road, Mary-le-bone, in the parish of St. Pancras - my tax papers are headed St. Pancras; nobody but myself rents the house. On the 31st of October I went out, and did not sleep at home that night; I slept at No. 16, Duke-street, Portland-place. I had left my house about five o'clock in the evening - every thing was perfectly safe when I went out; I went to my house next day, at one o'clock; I called for some cloaks, but did not go into the house - I remained at the gate. I called again at half-past three - I merely went for some clothes of my own and of the lady's with whom I was with in Duke-street; I did not go into the house - Aldridge, my servant, delivered them to me; I dined out. A friend came to me at No. 16, Duke-street, to tell me my house was robbed - I went there a few minutes after five o'clock, and found four or five officers in the dining-room; I found my wardrobe stripped, and the plate out of the dining-room gone; my wardrobe had not been locked - there was nothing left in it but an old pair of stockings; and some white dresses were left in a drawer. I missed a gold watch, worth 15l.; a pair of gold bracelets, worth eighteen guineas, four silk dresses, worth 16l.; a velvet pelisse, worth 21l.; twelve or thirteen shifts and about sixteen pairs of silk stockings; I also missed six silver dinner forks, which cost 21s. each; six desert forks; and eight table-spoons, worth 5l. or 6l. from the sideboard cupboard, in the dining-room; I had left the keys with my servant, and desired her to lock it - it was all my property. Some places had been unlocked, but not forced open. I suppose the property to be worth 130l. or 140l. altogether. but cannot be certain of the exact value. I did not tell the Magistrate that my wardrobe was forced - (looking at her deposition) I signed this - it says so here, but I never said it - it must be a mistake.

MARY ANN GREEN. On a Wednesday evening, late in October, I went to Burchett's lodgings; I do not know the day, or whether it was in October or November - I saw Isabella Aldridge there - she is Mrs. Kelly's servant; I knew her by that name: I went home with her to her mistress' house, and staid there all night, and in the morning went with her to Tottenham Court-road, to buy some gall to clean the parlour carpet - this was on Thursday morning - we both returned to the house, and a person sent to say she wished to speak to Aldridge; she went out, leaving me in the house; and about half-past twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner in the New-road - I was then with Aldridge - she asked him to come into the house, and he went in; Aldridge told him she was going to have a treat, a preserved damson pudding for her dinner - he said he was very fond of that: she told him she was going to meet her mistress in the afternoon, and could not stay to eat any of it, but if he would call in the course of the afternoon he should have some; the prisoner left the house, after eating a herring and a roll. Aldridge then went out, and I was left alone in the house - the prisoner came again in about half an hour; it was then about half-past two o'clock, I think; he knocked at the door, and I let him in; he came down to the kitchen; I told him the pudding was not done; he stood in the kitchen, looked round, and asked me if I could not get him a silver spoon - I asked him what for; he said to pledge for a trifle of money, for he was very much distressed; I asked where he thought I could get a silver spoon from, and said he would get me into disgrace, and the servant too; he then went up stairs: I went up with him, to let him out at the street door; as he went along the passage the parlour door was open - he went into the parlour, looked on the sideboard and about; I begged of him not to touch any thing that was there; the sideboard cupboard door stood a little open, and he took out a basket of plate: I begged of him not to do any thing of the kind; I saw him take the basket out, and saw there was silver in it, but do not know what kind of plate it was; he told me to keep all silent, and it would be all for the best; he told me to remain in the passage, and that if any one came not to open the door, and said he would have a good sweep; he went up stairs, and came down in about five minutes afterwards, with two bundles, and went out of the house. I never saw him any more till he came to the prison; when he went out he told me when the servant came in, to clap my hands together, and say, "Oh! Bella, I am sure there are thieves in the house, for there is such a noise up stairs;" the servant came in in about ten minutes after he went out, and directly after she came in the prisoner came up, and knocked at the door; the servant was very much frightened, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped.

Q. Had you told her what he mentioned when she came in? A. Yes; I said, "Oh! Bella, there is such a noise up stairs - I am sure there are thieves in the house." She went up stairs directly.

Q. Did she come down before be came to the door? A. No; he knocked at the door directly she came in - she came down directly, and told him her mistress' wardrobe was stripped; he told her to keep all silent, and to go for an officer; she went, and one came - she asked him where to go for an officer - he told her to go to Benson's butter-shop, at the corner of the New-road; she went, and the prisoner went away before the officer came; I never saw him again till he came to Clerkenwell prison, where I was taken on suspicion of being concerned in this. When I saw him there he begged of me to keep my own counsel. I have known the prisoner ten years - he was a shoemaker. I used to go out to work, as I could get it, but have no regular place of service.

Q. Had the prisoner employment at this time? A. Yes- I used to see him every day; I cannot mention the date on which this happened, but I remember Mrs. Kelly coming in a chaise about two o'clock on the Thursday - the prisoner was in the house at that time; Mrs. Kelly did not come in: the prisoner was in the kitchen, and went to hide himself, because she should not see him, and I went with him, as I did not wish to be seen - I do not know what Mrs. Kelly came for - she did not come again till after the robbery, to my knowledge; I do not know of any dress being taken to her.

Q. What did the prisoner do with the basket of plate? A. He put it into his pockets, I believe; he carried two bundles out, but I did not see what was in them.

ISABELLA ALDRIDGE. I was servant to Mrs. Kelly in October last; I remember seeing Green at Burchett's lodgings; I think it was on the last day of October - she went home, and slept with me that night; Mrs. Kelly did not sleep at home that night - it was on the Wednesday that she went out. I have known the prisoner about a twelvemonth - I did not see him on the Thursday till two o'clock; I saw him then in the New-road - Green called him, and asked him to come in - he came into Mrs. Kelly's house; he came down stairs; I had got some damsons, and told him I was going to have a damson pudding for dinner- he said it was what he was very fond of, and he should like some; I said if he could stop he might have some - he said he could not stop; I asked if he could come in the afternoon - he said No, he had got some work to do, and could not leave work till about eight o'clock in the evening- he had a herring, and part of a roll which was left at breakfast - he ate that, and then went out; I did not see him again till after the robbery: I had gone out to No. 16, Duke-street, where my mistress was, about half an hour after he left - I was to have taken her a dress and a pair of shoes - I forgot to take the shoes; she sent me home for them, and when I got there Green said she heard a noise in the house, and that I had left the door open.

Q. Well, but did your mistress come to the house in a gig? A. Yes; she came to the house about one o'clock, and about three; both times were before the robbery; I first heard of the robbery when I came home for the shoes, that was about five o'clock; I opened the door with a key, and called Green; she came up stairs from the kitchen, after I had called three times, and told me she had heard a dreadful noise in the house - that I had left the street door open, and she thought some one was in the house then. I had not left the door open.

Q. Did you go up stairs? A. Yes, and found the wardrobe almost stripped of all the clothes; I came down again, and when I came down the prisoner was at the door.

Q. Did you look at the sideboard? A. No - I did not go into the parlour. I told him the wardrobe was stripped, and asked him what I should do; he told me to go and fetch an officer; I asked him where - he told me to go to the butter-shop at the corner of the New-road; I went, and they told me where to go and get one; Benson keeps the butter-shop - he did not mention Benson's name; I was to ask them where there was an officer. I left the prisoner in the house; he told me he would stop till I came back, but he went away while I was gone; he told me to keep all quiet, and not to say that he had been to the house; I said No, I would not - I hoped God would strike me dead if I did, if he would stop till I got back, and he said he would.

Q. How came you to say you would not tell any body? A. Because he did not seem satisfied that I would not say he had been. and I thought if I said that he would stop till I came back, and if I did not say so he might go away; Green was by my side, and told me not to say she had been in the house; I said I wished her to stop with me, and she did stop.

GEORGE AVIS. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of November, at Clerkenwell prison; he came there to see Mary Ann Green - he said his name was Williams - I told him I knew it was Sutton, and he must come with me. As I took him to the office I told him I took him on suspicion of Mrs. Kelly's robbery - he said he was innocent - that he knew nothing of it, and was never in the house in his life, no farther than walking to and fro. I took him before Sir George Farrant - at his first examination he denied it, the same as he had to me; what he said was not then taken down: he was brought up a second time - I had no conversation with him; no threat nor promise was held out to him by any body; what he said was in the presence of the Magistrate, who took it down; it was read over to him, and he signed it; Sir George Farrant also signed it, and I witnessed it; I saw him sign his name - this is his statement (looking at it,) and this is Sir George Farrant's signature to it - here is my signature - the prisoner made no objection to signing it; (read) "I now acknowledge that I did take the property, as mentioned by Green, and gave the two bundles to a man named William Smith, who waited for them near Mrs. Kelly's house, but I never saw Smith afterwards, nor received any of the money the things might produce, - Henry Sutton."

MRS. CLEMENTS. I have not found any of my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Thursday that the robbery was committed I was to have met Green at two o'clock, to give her part of my earnings, to help maintain her; when I got to the bottom of Brook-street she told me to come that way - I was not inclined to go, but the servant beckoned to me to come in; I objected - I was asked to come in several times - I at last went in, and took part of a herring and roll; I then said I must go, as I had been ill for two months, and should lose my work if I did not attend to it; I went to the corner of the New-road. I had a subscription made for me while I was ill, and Smith had subscribed for me; I met him, and asked him to go and take part of a pint of porter - we went to a public-house, and had a pint of beer, and afterwards sixpenny-worth of rum; he asked how the young woman was who nursed me when I was ill- I told him she was at the prosecutrix's house, and I was to have something to eat there, and what money I had I would spend on him, for his kindness - I stopped there with him for half an hour, and in our conversation he said I was to blame if I did not get some property from the house, and could I not do it - I said No, but after awhile he overpowered me; I went in, and brought the property.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing him to have been induced to commit the offence by Smith.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
MarriageAncestry.com. Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text:

Name: Henry Sutton Spouse Name: Ann Liday Marriage Date: 1833 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Parramatta, New South Wales Registration Year: 1833 Volume Number: V

MarriageAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, St. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Text:

Name: Henry Sutton Gender: Male Age: 27 Birth Year: abt 1806 Marriage Date: 28 Sep 1833 Marriage Place: Parramatta, Cumberland, New South Wales, Australia Spouse: Ann Liddy Spouse Age: 18

DeathRootsWeb. WorldConnect [database on-line]. Ancestry.com, 2009