Caroline Purcell, 18101889 (aged 79 years)

Casey, John and Purcell, Caroline c. 1870
Name
Caroline /Purcell/
Given names
Caroline
Surname
Purcell
Married name
Caroline /Casey/
Name
Mary Caroline /Purcell/
Given names
Mary Caroline
Surname
Purcell
Married name
Mary Caroline /Casey/
Name
Caroline /Pursell/
Given names
Caroline
Surname
Pursell
Married name
Caroline /Casey/
Birth about 1810

Text:

age given as 19 in 1829 [see immigration below]

Immigration August 3, 1829 (aged 19 years)
Text:

Caroline Purcell, one of 119 convicts transported on the ship Sovereign, 15 April 1829 Crime: Theft of household goods Convicted at: London Gaol Delivery Sentence term: 7 years Ship: Sovereign Departure date: 15th April, 1829 Arrival date: 3rd August, 1829 Place of arrival New South Wales Passenger manifest Travelled with 120 other convicts

Citation details:

p. 348

Text:

The ship Sovereign (2) arrived in NSW 3 Aug 1829

Citation details:

Bound Indentures 1829

Text:

Purcell, Caroline, 18, could not read or write, single, native of Edinboro', all work, convicted of stealing in dwelling house, at London 21 Feb 1829, 7 years, no former convictions, 5 feet 1 inch tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair and hazel eyes, perpendicular scar in left eyebrow, scar over right eye, distributed to Moore, Liverpool

Citation details:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 04 June 2019), February 1829, trial of CAROLINE PURCELL (t18290219-127).

Text:

CAROLINE PURCELL, Theft > theft from a specified place, 19th February 1829. 653. CAROLINE PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December, 5 gowns, value 1l. 10s,; 3 shifts, value 15s.; 15 towels, value 15s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 8 1/2 yards of calico, value 6s.; 9 aprons, value 11s.; 2 yards of jean, value 4s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 10s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 silk bag, value 6d.; 1 comb, value 8s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 3 boxes, value 2s. 6d.; 2 brooches, value 2s. 6d.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 12s.; 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; 3 rings, value 12s.; 1 silver pencil-case, value 1s. 6d.; 4 seals, value 2s.; 1 shirt pin, value 10s.; 1 pair of clasps, value 2s.; 1 buckle, value 3s.; 2 table-cloths, value 2s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 5 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the goods of Mary King, in her dwelling-house.

MARY KING. I live in Great Bell-alley, but at the time in question I lived in Carr-square, St. Giles, Cripplegate, and kept the house - the prisoner's brother and sister lodged on the second floor; they told me she was out of a situation - they had been a month in the house, and she had been all that time with them. I went out on Saturday, the 18th of December, about one o'clock, and left nobody in the house but the prisoner, her brother, and sister; I had two young men lodgers, but they were not in the house - I came home about four o'clock; I had left this property locked up in a drawer on the first floor, where the two young men sleep; I live on the ground floor - the key was in the bottom drawer, which was empty; all the property stated in the indictment was in the drawers - I had seen them safe about nine days before; the young men lodgers were not away all that time - when I came home the prisoner came down stairs and said, "How soon you have come back - my sister is up stairs very ill in bed;" I had left her to mind my child on the ground floor room - I desired her to wait, and have a cup of tea with me, for taking care of my child; she said she would go and get her sister's fire ready - she came down, drank tea, and asked me to lend her a shawl to go out and look for a situation; she went up stairs, came down, and said Mr. Long had sent for me while I was out - this was between five and six o'clock; I work for Mr. Long, and went out to him - she went out at the door at the same time, and said she was going to look for a day's work; I went to Mr. Long, who lives in Cloth-fair, about a quarter of an hour's walk - on returning, the prisoner was not in the house; I did not see her again till she was taken up, which was about a week after - I had no occasion to go up stairs till ten o'clock at night; one young man returned then, and asked me for the key - I said the door was not locked, for I had left the key in the door, but I found then that the door was locked, and the key taken away; I found a box in the room broken open, which I had left safe before I went out - nothing was taken out of it; I searched the prisoner at Lambeth-street Office - a gown of mine was found on her, and a pair of shoes; I had seen them safe when I went to the drawers nine days before - a handkerchief of mine was found, but nothing else; the vlaue of the whole is 9l. 15s.; when I found the things on her she begged me not to take them away, or I should leave her without any thing on: Charlotte Rawson is my sister - they are her property, but were in my house and in my care. JAMES LEE. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 27th of January I apprehended the prisoner at a house in a court in Whitechapel; when I went up stairs she crept under the bedstead - I pulled her out, and told her the charge; she made no reply: I asked her where the property was - she said I should have no blood-money out of her; I found this handkerchief under the bed, and found a pair of shoes on her; Mrs. King claimed this gown and petticoat, which she had on at the office.(Property produced and sworn to.) Prisoner's Defence. I bought these shoes myself out of a shop - I bought the things; I could have stripped them off at the first examination, but I wore them, as I had bought them - I kept away, because I had a few words with my brother; I went out, got intoxicated, and staid away - I was ashamed to take the shawl back; I got under the bed when they came for me, as my, as my brother was with them, and he is a very severe man. CHARLOTTE RAWSON. I am certain these are my shoes - the other property is mine. GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only. Transported for Seven Years.

Religious marriageJohn CaseyView this family
1833 (aged 23 years)
Citation details:

Refused 1831

Text:

John Casey, 33, Sir G. Webster, 7 years, free Caroline Purcell, 20, Sovereign, 7 years, bond Not allowed, Casey being already married Revd. Robert Cartwright, Liverpool

Text:

Name: Mary C Purcell Spouse Name: John Casy Marriage Date: 1833 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales Registration Year: 1833 Volume Number: V

Death 1889 (aged 79 years)
Citation details:

Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 - 1940) Sat 21 Sep 1889 Page 3

Text:

DEATH.--Although no doubt your Gundaro correspondent has already furnished you with a report of the death of Mrs. John Casey, of Talagandra, I may add that the news of the death of that venerable old lady was received with great regret amongst the residents of Gininderra, by most of whom she was well known and highly respected; and although we shall never look upon the face of the good old lady again her many sterling qualities will long be remembered by all those who had the pleasure of her acquaintance.

Text:

Name: Mary C Casey Death Date: 1889 Death Place: New South Wales Registration Year: 1889 Registration Place: Queanbeyan, New South Wales Registration Number: 13442

Family with John Casey
husband
Casey, John and Purcell, Caroline c. 1870
17991882
Birth: 1799Tipperary, Munster, Ireland
Death: May 23, 1882Gundaroo, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
herself
Casey, John and Purcell, Caroline c. 1870
18101889
Birth: about 1810
Death: 1889Gundaroo, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1833Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
-13 months
son
18311903
Birth: December 4, 1831 32 21Liverpool, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1903Narrandera, Riverina, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
18351910
Birth: 1835 36 25Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1910Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18371917
Birth: 1837 38 27New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 27, 1917Cootamundra, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18391883
Birth: September 14, 1839 40 29Gundaroo, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1883Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
22 months
daughter
18411931
Birth: July 5, 1841 42 31Gundaroo, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1931Grenfell, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
5 years
son
18451915
Birth: 1845 46 35Gundaroo, Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1915Chatswood, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18471926
Birth: 1847 48 37Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1926Goulburn, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
son
18481939
Birth: 1848 49 38Southern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1939Goulburn, South West Slopes, New South Wales, Australia
BirthUniversity of Sheffield. Humanities Research Institute. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. [database on-line]. Sheffield: the Institute, 2003-2008
Text:

age given as 19 in 1829 [see immigration below]

ImmigrationThomas, Steve. Convict Records. [database online].
Text:

Caroline Purcell, one of 119 convicts transported on the ship Sovereign, 15 April 1829 Crime: Theft of household goods Convicted at: London Gaol Delivery Sentence term: 7 years Ship: Sovereign Departure date: 15th April, 1829 Arrival date: 3rd August, 1829 Place of arrival New South Wales Passenger manifest Travelled with 120 other convicts

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Citation details:

p. 348

Text:

The ship Sovereign (2) arrived in NSW 3 Aug 1829

ImmigrationAncestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Citation details:

Bound Indentures 1829

Text:

Purcell, Caroline, 18, could not read or write, single, native of Edinboro', all work, convicted of stealing in dwelling house, at London 21 Feb 1829, 7 years, no former convictions, 5 feet 1 inch tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair and hazel eyes, perpendicular scar in left eyebrow, scar over right eye, distributed to Moore, Liverpool

ImmigrationUniversity of Sheffield. Humanities Research Institute. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. [database on-line]. Sheffield: the Institute, 2003-2008
Citation details:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 04 June 2019), February 1829, trial of CAROLINE PURCELL (t18290219-127).

Text:

CAROLINE PURCELL, Theft > theft from a specified place, 19th February 1829. 653. CAROLINE PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December, 5 gowns, value 1l. 10s,; 3 shifts, value 15s.; 15 towels, value 15s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 8 1/2 yards of calico, value 6s.; 9 aprons, value 11s.; 2 yards of jean, value 4s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 10s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 silk bag, value 6d.; 1 comb, value 8s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 3 boxes, value 2s. 6d.; 2 brooches, value 2s. 6d.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 12s.; 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; 3 rings, value 12s.; 1 silver pencil-case, value 1s. 6d.; 4 seals, value 2s.; 1 shirt pin, value 10s.; 1 pair of clasps, value 2s.; 1 buckle, value 3s.; 2 table-cloths, value 2s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 5 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the goods of Mary King, in her dwelling-house.

MARY KING. I live in Great Bell-alley, but at the time in question I lived in Carr-square, St. Giles, Cripplegate, and kept the house - the prisoner's brother and sister lodged on the second floor; they told me she was out of a situation - they had been a month in the house, and she had been all that time with them. I went out on Saturday, the 18th of December, about one o'clock, and left nobody in the house but the prisoner, her brother, and sister; I had two young men lodgers, but they were not in the house - I came home about four o'clock; I had left this property locked up in a drawer on the first floor, where the two young men sleep; I live on the ground floor - the key was in the bottom drawer, which was empty; all the property stated in the indictment was in the drawers - I had seen them safe about nine days before; the young men lodgers were not away all that time - when I came home the prisoner came down stairs and said, "How soon you have come back - my sister is up stairs very ill in bed;" I had left her to mind my child on the ground floor room - I desired her to wait, and have a cup of tea with me, for taking care of my child; she said she would go and get her sister's fire ready - she came down, drank tea, and asked me to lend her a shawl to go out and look for a situation; she went up stairs, came down, and said Mr. Long had sent for me while I was out - this was between five and six o'clock; I work for Mr. Long, and went out to him - she went out at the door at the same time, and said she was going to look for a day's work; I went to Mr. Long, who lives in Cloth-fair, about a quarter of an hour's walk - on returning, the prisoner was not in the house; I did not see her again till she was taken up, which was about a week after - I had no occasion to go up stairs till ten o'clock at night; one young man returned then, and asked me for the key - I said the door was not locked, for I had left the key in the door, but I found then that the door was locked, and the key taken away; I found a box in the room broken open, which I had left safe before I went out - nothing was taken out of it; I searched the prisoner at Lambeth-street Office - a gown of mine was found on her, and a pair of shoes; I had seen them safe when I went to the drawers nine days before - a handkerchief of mine was found, but nothing else; the vlaue of the whole is 9l. 15s.; when I found the things on her she begged me not to take them away, or I should leave her without any thing on: Charlotte Rawson is my sister - they are her property, but were in my house and in my care. JAMES LEE. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 27th of January I apprehended the prisoner at a house in a court in Whitechapel; when I went up stairs she crept under the bedstead - I pulled her out, and told her the charge; she made no reply: I asked her where the property was - she said I should have no blood-money out of her; I found this handkerchief under the bed, and found a pair of shoes on her; Mrs. King claimed this gown and petticoat, which she had on at the office.(Property produced and sworn to.) Prisoner's Defence. I bought these shoes myself out of a shop - I bought the things; I could have stripped them off at the first examination, but I wore them, as I had bought them - I kept away, because I had a few words with my brother; I went out, got intoxicated, and staid away - I was ashamed to take the shawl back; I got under the bed when they came for me, as my, as my brother was with them, and he is a very severe man. CHARLOTTE RAWSON. I am certain these are my shoes - the other property is mine. GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only. Transported for Seven Years.

MarriageAncestry.com, 'New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts' Applications to Marry, 1826-1851' [Database Online].
Citation details:

Refused 1831

Text:

John Casey, 33, Sir G. Webster, 7 years, free Caroline Purcell, 20, Sovereign, 7 years, bond Not allowed, Casey being already married Revd. Robert Cartwright, Liverpool

MarriageAncestry.com. Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text:

Name: Mary C Purcell Spouse Name: John Casy Marriage Date: 1833 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Sydney, New South Wales Registration Year: 1833 Volume Number: V

DeathNational Library of Australia. Trove: one search...a wealth of information. [database on-line].
Citation details:

Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 - 1940) Sat 21 Sep 1889 Page 3

Text:

DEATH.--Although no doubt your Gundaro correspondent has already furnished you with a report of the death of Mrs. John Casey, of Talagandra, I may add that the news of the death of that venerable old lady was received with great regret amongst the residents of Gininderra, by most of whom she was well known and highly respected; and although we shall never look upon the face of the good old lady again her many sterling qualities will long be remembered by all those who had the pleasure of her acquaintance.

DeathAncestry.com. Australia Death Index, 1787-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Text:

Name: Mary C Casey Death Date: 1889 Death Place: New South Wales Registration Year: 1889 Registration Place: Queanbeyan, New South Wales Registration Number: 13442