Mary Ann Starkey, 18171892 (aged 75 years)

Name
Mary Ann Starkey
Given names
Mary Ann
Surname
Starkey
Married name
Mary Ann Brogden
Name
Mary Starky
Given names
Mary
Surname
Starky
Name
Mary Ann Starkie
Given names
Mary Ann
Surname
Starkie
Birth about 1817 34

Christening August 6, 1817 35 (aged 0)
Text:

Baptised at St Bartholomew, daughter of John Starkey and Martha

Birth of a brotherJohn Starkey
about 1820 (aged 3 years)

Baptism of a brotherJohn Starkey
September 3, 1820 (aged 3 years)
Text:

Baptised at St Bartholomew, son of John Starkey and Martha

Birth of a brotherWilliam Augustus Starkey
about 1822 (aged 5 years)

Baptism of a brotherWilliam Augustus Starkey
April 7, 1822 (aged 5 years)
Text:

Baptised at St Bartholomew, son of John Starkey and Martha

Immigration October 12, 1836 (aged 19 years)
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 90, Class and Piece Number HO11/10, Page Number 295 (150)

Text:

Mary Starkie, one of 161 convicts transported on the Elizabeth, 20 June 1836. Sentence details: Convicted at Central Criminal Court for a term of 14 years. Vessel: Elizabeth. Date of Departure: 20 June 1836. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

Text:

Arrived 12 Oct 1836

Citation details:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 08 October 2011), September 1835, trial of MARY STARKIE MARTHA STARKIE (t18350921-1978).

Text:

Mary Starkie, Martha Starkie, Stealing, theft from master, theft receiving, 21st Sep 1835: MARY STARKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 pillow-case, value 1/-; 6 half-crowns, 8 sixpences, and 240 farthings; the goods and monies of William Holt, her master; and MARTHA STARKIE, for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods and monies, well knowing them to have been stolen: against the Statute.—2nd COUNT, for feloniously receiving from an evil-disposed person. SARAH HOLT. I am the wife of William Holt, of Mabb's-place, Fetter-lane, in the parish of St. Dunstan; he is a green-grocer an fruiterer. The prisoner, Mary Starkie, came into my service the latter end of May—the other prisoner is her mother—I knew her at the time to be her mother—she came to my house once—I only saw her there once—I attend Farringdon-market to sell my goods, and so does my husband—at the time Mary Starrkie was with us, I had 60l. Which I had earned and saved up—there were two sovereigns, four half-soverigns, 5l. in sixpences, and 2l. in shillings—It was chiefly in silver—I kept it in a box under my bed, locked up—the prisoner left me on the 12th as I missed it on the 19th—I did not miss any thing till after she went—I went to get 18l. to pay a bill, and the money was all gone—I missed it all at once—three weeks before she came to me, the money was all safe—I did not look at it from that time till nearly a week after she left—I had no other servant while she was with me—the box was not broken—It had been opened by a false key—I had the charge of the box alone, not my husband—a brooch that was in the box was also gone—I missed six half-crowns, 5s. in farthings and six sixpences, out of a drawer—two of them were new ones—It was all I was worth—I missed the money out of the box, on the 19th—I missed the property from the drawer, at her last examination—the money in the drawer was there three weeks after she came into my service—I missed a pillow-case about the same time as the money from the drawer—I had seen it safe when I saw the money—I had seen it safe about a month before I missed it—I missed a pair of women's boots, a silk handkerchief, a child's pinafore and cap—I had kept them down stairs in the drawers, which were open—I had not missed any of the linen articles before I lost the money—I missed the "Pilgrim's Progress" with my children's ages in it—I saw the book and the brooch again, at the examination at Guildhall, in August—I had not seen the book for two months after she had been with me—about three weeks before she left me, she told me she had been married a month before she came to me—I did not give her warning, but she gave me a week's warning, saying her husband wanted her at home, and she went home to her mother when she left me—she was living at her mother's—I went there a week after she left me—my sister keeps the house they lived in—I was often at my sister's, but never saw the rooms they occupied—I found the book I had missed on the mother's premises—w en I missed the money on the Sunday, I went with the officer and looked about the place, and under the bed I found a handkerchief, a pillow-case, and cap, and my book—this was the Sunday after she left—I found my brooch in a little box on the table, in the front room, and the book also—the prisoners were in the Compter at that time—they had been taken up on the Wednesday—at the second hearing, when I went home, I heard something, and went over to Mrs. Graham, who gave me a key. Mary Starkie. The pillow-case is my mother's—the brooch is mine—I have had it three years—she lent me the book to take home to read on Sunday, and she lent me the boots to go home in one night, when it was wet. Witness. I did not—I never gave her leave to take them or the book—these are my pillow-case and brooch. SARAH GRAHAM . I live in Mabb's-place. Fetter-lane. I know the prisoner Mary, by her living with Mrs. Holt—I remember her coming to my place once, about two months before she was taken, she asked me if if I had got a key to lend her, to get Billy, Mrs. Holt's child, a clean pinafore out of the drawer—I asked her why she did not send Jemmy to the market—she said she had nothing to put on him—I then lent her a key—she brought it back in a few minutes—I live opposite Mrs. Holt—she did not keep the key three minutes hardly—It was early in the morning—I had seen Mrs. Holt go off to the market just before, in a great hurry—It was about ten o'clock—the prisoner said, some time after, that she was going to be married, and she was in the family-way—I sold her some little things, which I did not want—she said the young man she kept company with had got £20 left him, and with that she was buying the things—that was after she borrowed the key—It was not long before she went away, when I heard of the loss of the money—I See original gave the key to a person to take over to Mrs. Holt—I have not had it since—I never lent the prisoner more than one key—I had no others except a very large box-key. JAMES LLOYD. I am an officer of Farringdon Without. I was applied to, to apprehend the prisoners on the 19th of August—I went and apprehended them between mine and ten o'clock at night, at No. 1, Brackley-street, Golden-lane—the daughter was in the garret of the front room, and her sweetheart was on the bed—the mother was not at home at that time; she came home, and I took her the same night, between ten and eleven o'clock—I found the brooch on the table in the front garret, which is a sitting-room—next day I went and found the book on the same table, and the pillow-case on a pillow in the bed; and under the bed a pinafore, cap, a pair of boots, and handkerchief—they rented the front and back garrets—t e bed was in the back room—I found nothing else which has been claimed—I found a good deal of other property, five new gowns, three gown-pieces unmade, one on the premises, and two at a dressmaker's, two remnants of calico, and ten napkins—I found under the tiles, out of the window, a pillow-case marked W., four towels, a table-cloth marked F., two shawls, two children's frocks, two lengths of muslin for window curtains, three cotton aprons, two petticoats, five children's shirts, a length of flannel, a black veil, four lengths of lace, three handkerchiefs, several caps, a bonnet, and other things—the gowns appeared all nearly the same size, to fit the prisoner Mary—some of them appeared to fit the elder prisoner—I have had the articles I found in my possession ever since. SARAH FIELD. I am niece of the elder prisoner. I have been living with her about three months from this time—I lived with her at the time her daughter Mary lived with Mrs. Holt—I remember her bringing money to her mother's—It was principally silver—I saw a sovereign and a half brought at one time—I saw her bring about 1l. or 2l. of silver at a time, as near as I can tell—I have seen her bring money two or three times a-week—I did not hear them say where it came from—the mother sent me with a gold ring to Mary once, and told me to tell Mary to go up and get her some money if she was not too tired—I never asked where they got the money from, not heard the mother ask her—I did not know—I saw some money put into a bag between two beds, by the mother—I have seen that done more than once—they slept on that bed—the mother had relief from the parish at the same time. JAMES LLOYD re-examined. I have Mrs. Graham's key, and produce it. MRS. GRAHAM. This is very much like the key I lent her, but I cannot sweat to it, because I never noticed it—I gave it to Mrs. Jennings to take over to Mrs. Holt—she is not here—I have no doubt it is the key, it was one like this. MRS. HOLT. I have tried this key—It will open my drawer, but will not touch the box. (Properly produced and sworn to.) Mary Starkie's Defence. The money I never saw, nor did I know they had any—the brooch is my own; I bought it when I lived with Mr. Taylor, of Great Prescott-street, three years ago—I had the best part of these things before I went to live with Mrs. Holt. MARY STARKIE.— GUILTY Aged 18. MARTHA STARKIE.— GUILTY . Aged 49. Transported for Fourteen Years.

MarriageJoseph BrogdenView this family
1837 (aged 20 years)
Text:

V18371471 21/1837 BROGDEN JOSEPH STARKY MARY CJ (St James)

Text:

Granted 1837: Joseph Brogden age 33 Norfolk 7 years free Mary Starkie 20 Elizabeth 7 years

Birth of a daughter
#1
Martha Ann Brogden
January 27, 1838 (aged 21 years)

Birth of a son
#2
Joseph Brogden
September 10, 1840 (aged 23 years)
Text:

Name: Joseph Brogden Gender: Male Baptism Age: 0 Birth Date: 10 Sep 1840 Baptism Date: 4 Oct 1840 Baptism Place: St. James, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Residence Date: 1840 Residence Place: New South Wales, Australia Father: Joseph Brogden Mother: Mary FHL Film Number: 993953

Birth of a son
#3
William Henry Brogden
February 1, 1847 (aged 30 years)
Citation details:

Parramatta North All Saints Baptism 03 March 1844 - 31 December 1916

Text:

Born 1 Feb 1847 and baptised 4 Apr 1847 William henry son of Joseph and Mary Brogden a ginger beer brewer of Church Street

Birth of a daughter
#4
Sarah Ann Brogden
October 28, 1849 (aged 32 years)
Citation details:

Parramatta North All Saints Baptism 03 March 1844 - 31 December 1916

Text:

Born 28 Oct 1849 and baptised 18 Nov 1849 Sarah Ann daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Brogden a general dealer of this parish

Christening of a daughterSarah Ann Brogden
November 18, 1849 (aged 32 years)
Citation details:

Parramatta North All Saints Baptism 03 March 1844 - 31 December 1916

Text:

Born 28 Oct 1849 and baptised 18 Nov 1849 Sarah Ann daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Brogden a general dealer of this parish

Birth of a son
#5
John Thomas Brogden
June 21, 1852 (aged 35 years)
Citation details:

Parramatta North All Saints Baptism 03 March 1844 - 31 December 1916

Text:

Born 21 Jun 1852 and baptised 18 Jul 1852 John Thomas son of Joseph and Mary Brogden a brewer of this parish

Birth of a daughter
#6
Frances Catherine Brogden
August 18, 1854 (aged 37 years)
Citation details:

Parramatta North All Saints Baptism 03 March 1844 - 31 December 1916

Text:

Born 18 Aug 1854 and baptised 17 Sep 1854 Frances Catharine daughter of Joseph and Mary Brogden a brewer of Church Street

Marriage of a childWilliam Coleman CoxMartha Ann BrogdenView this family
January 23, 1856 (aged 39 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Thu 24 Jan 1856 p. 8

Text:

MARRIAGES. By special license, on the 23rd instant, at St. James' Church, Sydney, by the Rev. R. Allwood, William Coleman Cox, of Parra- matta, to Martha Ann Brogden, eldest daughter of Joseph Brog- den, of the same place.

Birth of a daughter
#7
Mary Elizabeth Brogden
1857 (aged 40 years)
Death of a husbandJoseph Brogden
1859 (aged 42 years)

Marriage of a childJoseph BrogdenSusannah MouldsView this family
November 10, 1875 (aged 58 years)
Text:

Joseph Brogden born Sydney, shopkeeper age 35, usual residence Parramatta, son of Joseph Brogden and Mary Starkey, and Susannah Moulds, spinster born Dural age 29, daughter of Simon Moulds and Rosetta James, witnesses William Henry and Mary Brogden.

Marriage of a childCharles CrouchMary Elizabeth BrogdenView this family
1879 (aged 62 years)
Text:

Name: Mary E Brogden Spouse Name: Charles Crouch Marriage Date: 1879 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Parramatta, New South Wales Registration Year: 1879 Registration Number: 4372

Death of a motherMartha Ann Field
May 2, 1879 (aged 62 years)
Citation details:

Sydney Morning Herald Sat 3 May 1879 p. 1

Text:

STARKEY. - May 2, at 138 Phillip-street, Martha Ann, beloved mother of John and William Starkey, of this city, aged 97 years.

Burial of a motherMartha Ann Field
May 4, 1879 (aged 62 years)
Marriage of a childThomas George MarkwellSarah Ann BrogdenView this family
1880 (aged 63 years)
Text:

Name: Thos George Markwell Jr Spouse Name: Sarah A Brogden Marriage Date: 1880 Marriage Place: New South Wales Registration Place: Mudgee, New South Wales Registration Year: 1880 Registration Number: 4066

Death of a brotherWilliam Augustus Starkey
1888 (aged 71 years)
Text:

3193/1888 STARKEY WILLIAM A JOHN MARTHA A PETERSHAM

Death 1892 (aged 75 years)
Family with parents
father
mother
17821879
Birth: April 15, 1782London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom
Death: May 2, 1879Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: September 6, 1807Shoreditch, London, England, United Kingdom
11 years
herself
18171892
Birth: about 1817 34
Death: 1892Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
younger brother
18201898
Birth: about 1820 37
Death: 1898Randwick, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
younger brother
18221888
Birth: about 1822 39
Death: 1888Petersham, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Family with Joseph Brogden
husband
18051859
Birth: 1805
Death: 1859
herself
18171892
Birth: about 1817 34
Death: 1892Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage
Marriage: 1837Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
13 months
daughter
18381916
Birth: January 27, 1838 33 21
Death: July 3, 1916Carlingford, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18401912
Birth: September 10, 1840 35 23Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: August 10, 1912Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
7 years
son
18471933
Birth: February 1, 1847 42 30Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1933Randwick, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18491938
Birth: October 28, 1849 44 32North Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1938Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
18521928
Birth: June 21, 1852 47 35North Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1928Randwick, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
daughter
18541928
Birth: August 18, 1854 49 37Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1928Campbelltown, South Coast and Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
daughter
18571946
Birth: 1857 52 40Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 27, 1946Parramatta, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
ChristeningChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Familysearch. England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975. [database on-line]: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2008
Text:

Baptised at St Bartholomew, daughter of John Starkey and Martha

ImmigrationState Library of Queensland. Convict Transportation Registers Database 1787-1867 [database on-line].
Citation details:

Source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 90, Class and Piece Number HO11/10, Page Number 295 (150)

Text:

Mary Starkie, one of 161 convicts transported on the Elizabeth, 20 June 1836. Sentence details: Convicted at Central Criminal Court for a term of 14 years. Vessel: Elizabeth. Date of Departure: 20 June 1836. Place of Arrival: New South Wales.

ImmigrationBateson, Charles. The convict ships 1787-1868. 2nd ed. Glasgow : Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd., 1985 ie 1969
Text:

Arrived 12 Oct 1836

ImmigrationUniversity of Sheffield. Humanities Research Institute. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. [database on-line]. Sheffield: the Institute, 2003-2008
Citation details:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 08 October 2011), September 1835, trial of MARY STARKIE MARTHA STARKIE (t18350921-1978).

Text:

Mary Starkie, Martha Starkie, Stealing, theft from master, theft receiving, 21st Sep 1835: MARY STARKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 pillow-case, value 1/-; 6 half-crowns, 8 sixpences, and 240 farthings; the goods and monies of William Holt, her master; and MARTHA STARKIE, for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods and monies, well knowing them to have been stolen: against the Statute.—2nd COUNT, for feloniously receiving from an evil-disposed person. SARAH HOLT. I am the wife of William Holt, of Mabb's-place, Fetter-lane, in the parish of St. Dunstan; he is a green-grocer an fruiterer. The prisoner, Mary Starkie, came into my service the latter end of May—the other prisoner is her mother—I knew her at the time to be her mother—she came to my house once—I only saw her there once—I attend Farringdon-market to sell my goods, and so does my husband—at the time Mary Starrkie was with us, I had 60l. Which I had earned and saved up—there were two sovereigns, four half-soverigns, 5l. in sixpences, and 2l. in shillings—It was chiefly in silver—I kept it in a box under my bed, locked up—the prisoner left me on the 12th as I missed it on the 19th—I did not miss any thing till after she went—I went to get 18l. to pay a bill, and the money was all gone—I missed it all at once—three weeks before she came to me, the money was all safe—I did not look at it from that time till nearly a week after she left—I had no other servant while she was with me—the box was not broken—It had been opened by a false key—I had the charge of the box alone, not my husband—a brooch that was in the box was also gone—I missed six half-crowns, 5s. in farthings and six sixpences, out of a drawer—two of them were new ones—It was all I was worth—I missed the money out of the box, on the 19th—I missed the property from the drawer, at her last examination—the money in the drawer was there three weeks after she came into my service—I missed a pillow-case about the same time as the money from the drawer—I had seen it safe when I saw the money—I had seen it safe about a month before I missed it—I missed a pair of women's boots, a silk handkerchief, a child's pinafore and cap—I had kept them down stairs in the drawers, which were open—I had not missed any of the linen articles before I lost the money—I missed the "Pilgrim's Progress" with my children's ages in it—I saw the book and the brooch again, at the examination at Guildhall, in August—I had not seen the book for two months after she had been with me—about three weeks before she left me, she told me she had been married a month before she came to me—I did not give her warning, but she gave me a week's warning, saying her husband wanted her at home, and she went home to her mother when she left me—she was living at her mother's—I went there a week after she left me—my sister keeps the house they lived in—I was often at my sister's, but never saw the rooms they occupied—I found the book I had missed on the mother's premises—w en I missed the money on the Sunday, I went with the officer and looked about the place, and under the bed I found a handkerchief, a pillow-case, and cap, and my book—this was the Sunday after she left—I found my brooch in a little box on the table, in the front room, and the book also—the prisoners were in the Compter at that time—they had been taken up on the Wednesday—at the second hearing, when I went home, I heard something, and went over to Mrs. Graham, who gave me a key. Mary Starkie. The pillow-case is my mother's—the brooch is mine—I have had it three years—she lent me the book to take home to read on Sunday, and she lent me the boots to go home in one night, when it was wet. Witness. I did not—I never gave her leave to take them or the book—these are my pillow-case and brooch. SARAH GRAHAM . I live in Mabb's-place. Fetter-lane. I know the prisoner Mary, by her living with Mrs. Holt—I remember her coming to my place once, about two months before she was taken, she asked me if if I had got a key to lend her, to get Billy, Mrs. Holt's child, a clean pinafore out of the drawer—I asked her why she did not send Jemmy to the market—she said she had nothing to put on him—I then lent her a key—she brought it back in a few minutes—I live opposite Mrs. Holt—she did not keep the key three minutes hardly—It was early in the morning—I had seen Mrs. Holt go off to the market just before, in a great hurry—It was about ten o'clock—the prisoner said, some time after, that she was going to be married, and she was in the family-way—I sold her some little things, which I did not want—she said the young man she kept company with had got £20 left him, and with that she was buying the things—that was after she borrowed the key—It was not long before she went away, when I heard of the loss of the money—I See original gave the key to a person to take over to Mrs. Holt—I have not had it since—I never lent the prisoner more than one key—I had no others except a very large box-key. JAMES LLOYD. I am an officer of Farringdon Without. I was applied to, to apprehend the prisoners on the 19th of August—I went and apprehended them between mine and ten o'clock at night, at No. 1, Brackley-street, Golden-lane—the daughter was in the garret of the front room, and her sweetheart was on the bed—the mother was not at home at that time; she came home, and I took her the same night, between ten and eleven o'clock—I found the brooch on the table in the front garret, which is a sitting-room—next day I went and found the book on the same table, and the pillow-case on a pillow in the bed; and under the bed a pinafore, cap, a pair of boots, and handkerchief—they rented the front and back garrets—t e bed was in the back room—I found nothing else which has been claimed—I found a good deal of other property, five new gowns, three gown-pieces unmade, one on the premises, and two at a dressmaker's, two remnants of calico, and ten napkins—I found under the tiles, out of the window, a pillow-case marked W., four towels, a table-cloth marked F., two shawls, two children's frocks, two lengths of muslin for window curtains, three cotton aprons, two petticoats, five children's shirts, a length of flannel, a black veil, four lengths of lace, three handkerchiefs, several caps, a bonnet, and other things—the gowns appeared all nearly the same size, to fit the prisoner Mary—some of them appeared to fit the elder prisoner—I have had the articles I found in my possession ever since. SARAH FIELD. I am niece of the elder prisoner. I have been living with her about three months from this time—I lived with her at the time her daughter Mary lived with Mrs. Holt—I remember her bringing money to her mother's—It was principally silver—I saw a sovereign and a half brought at one time—I saw her bring about 1l. or 2l. of silver at a time, as near as I can tell—I have seen her bring money two or three times a-week—I did not hear them say where it came from—the mother sent me with a gold ring to Mary once, and told me to tell Mary to go up and get her some money if she was not too tired—I never asked where they got the money from, not heard the mother ask her—I did not know—I saw some money put into a bag between two beds, by the mother—I have seen that done more than once—they slept on that bed—the mother had relief from the parish at the same time. JAMES LLOYD re-examined. I have Mrs. Graham's key, and produce it. MRS. GRAHAM. This is very much like the key I lent her, but I cannot sweat to it, because I never noticed it—I gave it to Mrs. Jennings to take over to Mrs. Holt—she is not here—I have no doubt it is the key, it was one like this. MRS. HOLT. I have tried this key—It will open my drawer, but will not touch the box. (Properly produced and sworn to.) Mary Starkie's Defence. The money I never saw, nor did I know they had any—the brooch is my own; I bought it when I lived with Mr. Taylor, of Great Prescott-street, three years ago—I had the best part of these things before I went to live with Mrs. Holt. MARY STARKIE.— GUILTY Aged 18. MARTHA STARKIE.— GUILTY . Aged 49. Transported for Fourteen Years.

MarriageNew South Wales. Department of Justice and Attorney General. NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages. [data-base on-line]. Sydney: the Registry.
Text:

V18371471 21/1837 BROGDEN JOSEPH STARKY MARY CJ (St James)

MarriageAncestry.com, 'New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts' Applications to Marry, 1826-1851' [Database Online].
Text:

Granted 1837: Joseph Brogden age 33 Norfolk 7 years free Mary Starkie 20 Elizabeth 7 years

DeathTowe, Jennifer, 'Joseph Brogden', email to Marion Purnell Sep 27 2010