William Browning, 1807

Name
William /Browning/
Given names
William
Surname
Browning
Birth
about 1807 27
Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) View title info Mon 16 Apr 1827 Page 2
Text:

age given as 20 in 1827 [see below]

Immigration
Text:

came free per the ship Friends 1811

Text:

accompanied his convict mother, Mary Browning

Text:

In later records, he is described as having been born in the colony

Census
Citation details: 1825 muster (1823-1825)
Text:

Browning, William,. came free, Friends, 1811, labourer, Wilberforce

Charged with robbery
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, William Browning and James Yew were severally charged with a robbery. Committed for trial at sessions.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Windsor Quarter Sessions...
Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, Wm. Browning and James Yaw were discharged by Proclamation.

Convicted for stealing
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Fri 27 Apr 1827 p. 3
Text:

WINDSOR...
APRIL 14...
Mary Goodwin was charged with being drunk and a little disorderly. Mary is an elderly woman; her son was ordered for transportation two days ago; she had travelled twelve miles to say "farewell;" acquaintances more frequently invite to "the bottle" than "the board;" she had drunk too freely, the effects are common. Mary, you are this time to be pitied. Fined five shillings to the poor, but being unable to pay, was allowed a few days to make up the fine - "god bless you, gentlemen, Micky Conner will pay you!"

Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Mon 16 Apr 1827 Page 2
Text:

"William Browning and Joseph Glasspole were indicted with having stolen some womens' wearing apparel, the property of Jane McCoy, while travelling in a cart from Parramatta to Windsor. The prosecutrix is about 69 years of age, and Wm. Browning is about 20, and the scene described by two of the witnesses, as having taken place between them at the time of the robbery, in an open cart, at noon-day, was truly shocking and shewed their depraved character most effectually. Browning had pushed the old woman out of the cart and drove on, keeping possession of her bundle containing wearing apparel; he was unknown to the old woman, but she kept a good look-out at Windsor; and at length espied her gown on the person of a newly married female at Tom the Barber's, at Windsor. A warrant was issued, and while the person stood before the Court on whom the gown had been found, the prosecutrix also identified a petticoat, containing a certain number of tucks; she had brought them with her from Port Macquarie. Two persons proved Browning had sold the property in question, and he had admitted the fact, but in his defence stated he had purchased the articles from the old woman. The evidence did not appear against Glasspole. The Jury retired about 20 minutes; and having again taken their seats. declared Glasspole, Not Guilty. Browning, Guilty.
Browning is a native of the colony, and most of the gentlemen of the Petit Jury were natives of the Colony also, and although it tended to show he was a hardened offender, we must insert in our report the encomium he thought proper, on such an occasion, to pay his dear countrymen, for the obligation he was under to their opinion of their fellow Australian, which was elicited in the following manner: The learned Chairman addressed the prisoner, and concluded by passing sentence - y years transportation.
The prisoner immediately remarked. "Well, there's a pretty set of fellows to be jurymen! they know more about a dish of ominey a good deal - what should they know about a Jury. The sentence being delivered with true energy, had a ludicrous effect; but, be it known to all concerned, that the learned Chairman, in his address to the Petit Jury at the close of the Session, expressed the high degree of satisfaction with which they had acquitted themselves to the service of their country."

Citation details: Entrance Book Sydney 1825-1832
Text:

Browning, William, native, Quarter Sessions, Windsor, larceny, Penal settlement 7 years, June 19, Hulk

Census
Death
yes
Family with parents
father
mother
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriageestimated 1804
3 years
elder sister
18061864
Birth: about 1806 26
Death: May 28, 1864New South Wales, Australia
2 years
himself
1807
Birth: about 1807 27
Death:
Mother’s family with Edward Goodwin
stepfather
Birth:
Death:
mother
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Religious marriage Religious marriageAugust 31, 1812Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
2 years
half-brother
18141894
Birth: about 1814 34 New South Wales, Australia
Death: 1894Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
half-sister
1816
Birth: about 1816 36 New South Wales, Australia
Death:
3 years
half-brother
18181858
Birth: about 1818 38 New South Wales, Australia
Death: May 17, 1858Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
Mother’s family with Michael Connor
stepfather
17801853
Birth: about 1780
Death: estimated 1853Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia
mother
17801835
Birth: about 1780
Death: 1835Sydney City, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Marriage Marriageabout 1824New South Wales, Australia
Birth
Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) View title info Mon 16 Apr 1827 Page 2
Text:

age given as 20 in 1827 [see below]

Immigration
Text:

came free per the ship Friends 1811

Text:

accompanied his convict mother, Mary Browning

Text:

In later records, he is described as having been born in the colony

Census
Citation details: 1825 muster (1823-1825)
Text:

Browning, William,. came free, Friends, 1811, labourer, Wilberforce

Charged with robbery
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, William Browning and James Yew were severally charged with a robbery. Committed for trial at sessions.

Citation details: Sydney Gazette Sat 21 Oct 1826 p. 3
Text:

Windsor Quarter Sessions...
Mary Goodwin, Michael Connor, Wm. Browning and James Yaw were discharged by Proclamation.

Convicted for stealing
Citation details: Sydney Gazette Fri 27 Apr 1827 p. 3
Text:

WINDSOR...
APRIL 14...
Mary Goodwin was charged with being drunk and a little disorderly. Mary is an elderly woman; her son was ordered for transportation two days ago; she had travelled twelve miles to say "farewell;" acquaintances more frequently invite to "the bottle" than "the board;" she had drunk too freely, the effects are common. Mary, you are this time to be pitied. Fined five shillings to the poor, but being unable to pay, was allowed a few days to make up the fine - "god bless you, gentlemen, Micky Conner will pay you!"

Citation details: The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Mon 16 Apr 1827 Page 2
Text:

"William Browning and Joseph Glasspole were indicted with having stolen some womens' wearing apparel, the property of Jane McCoy, while travelling in a cart from Parramatta to Windsor. The prosecutrix is about 69 years of age, and Wm. Browning is about 20, and the scene described by two of the witnesses, as having taken place between them at the time of the robbery, in an open cart, at noon-day, was truly shocking and shewed their depraved character most effectually. Browning had pushed the old woman out of the cart and drove on, keeping possession of her bundle containing wearing apparel; he was unknown to the old woman, but she kept a good look-out at Windsor; and at length espied her gown on the person of a newly married female at Tom the Barber's, at Windsor. A warrant was issued, and while the person stood before the Court on whom the gown had been found, the prosecutrix also identified a petticoat, containing a certain number of tucks; she had brought them with her from Port Macquarie. Two persons proved Browning had sold the property in question, and he had admitted the fact, but in his defence stated he had purchased the articles from the old woman. The evidence did not appear against Glasspole. The Jury retired about 20 minutes; and having again taken their seats. declared Glasspole, Not Guilty. Browning, Guilty.
Browning is a native of the colony, and most of the gentlemen of the Petit Jury were natives of the Colony also, and although it tended to show he was a hardened offender, we must insert in our report the encomium he thought proper, on such an occasion, to pay his dear countrymen, for the obligation he was under to their opinion of their fellow Australian, which was elicited in the following manner: The learned Chairman addressed the prisoner, and concluded by passing sentence - y years transportation.
The prisoner immediately remarked. "Well, there's a pretty set of fellows to be jurymen! they know more about a dish of ominey a good deal - what should they know about a Jury. The sentence being delivered with true energy, had a ludicrous effect; but, be it known to all concerned, that the learned Chairman, in his address to the Petit Jury at the close of the Session, expressed the high degree of satisfaction with which they had acquitted themselves to the service of their country."

Citation details: Entrance Book Sydney 1825-1832
Text:

Browning, William, native, Quarter Sessions, Windsor, larceny, Penal settlement 7 years, June 19, Hulk

Census
Text:

Browning, William, born in the colony, 7 years, Moreton Bay